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Full text of "The National temperance songster"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC. 



Fifteen years' experience in teaching vocal music, haa con- 
vinced the wnter that not more than one in a thousand fails, on 
due trial, to learn how to sing. The experience of teachers and 
physicians, testifies that singing is a healthy exercise. When prop- 
erly studied, it tends, as much as any other science, to strengthen 
the mind ; and, probably there is nothing practised by Christians 
that exerts so great an influence for good in a moral point of view. 
It has the authority of divine writ, and the approbation of all 
good men in its favor ; and is the most innocent of all amusements. 

A few elementary lessons well studied, will enable a student to 
sing plain church music at sight. And it is much better to study 
a few lessons carefully, than to skim over a volume of lessons and 
exercises. Moreover, as the Rev. Thos. Harrison wrote in a recent 
letter to the uthor, *^ Lessons in time and melody are the most 
that are needed." 

Exercises in numeral notation are found in all the best instruction 
books extant. Indeed, the principles of musical science cannot 
be fully and fairly developed vv^thout u^nig numerals ; aiid, since 
every principle of the science may be v s fully and more clearly 
developed by numerals, it is a v/aste of time, pi^per, and money, to 
study the Guidonian or round note system first. Everything 
belonging to the round note system of notation, except the posi- 
tion of the notes, is taught in numeral notation, and at least thic^~ 
fourths of the time is saved. A very small part of that time thi 
saved, will suffice for the student to learn the position of the note^ 
on the five-lined staff, and the round note, together with the whole 
tribe of patent note systems, will be understood at once. 

The Christian Psalmist was first published in round notes, nu- 
merals, and patent notes. There were ten thousand copies sold ; 
and the purchasers, having the three systems constantly before 
them, decided, almost unanimously, in favor of the numeral sys- 
tem. Since that decision, more thai.^ 120 thousand copies have 
been published entirely in the numeral svsteni, and rdeaily sold, 



4 MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC, 

while there is no demand whatever for those with round and patent 
not© music. 

MUSIC 

Is a pleasing succession, or combination of sounds. A sound 
is always sustained to a certain height or pitch, while a noise 
varies, instantly, from one pitch to another. A cricket makes a 
sound, while a gnat makes a noisSe. 

The sensation of sound is conveyed to the brain by the auditojy 
nerve ; this nerve connects with the tympanum, or drum, of the 
ear ; and this drum is caused to vibrate and act upon the auditory 
nerve, by the undulations of the air." The air is caused to vibrate, 
is put into an undulating or wavy motion, by effort of the vocal 
organs, by striking a bell, the string of a violin, and things of like 
character. If the vibrations are less than 32 in a second of time, 
they do not put the tympanum of the ear into motion, and the 
sound is too low to be heard. If the vibrations are more than 
819^ in a second of time, they strain the tympanum so that it 
cannot vibrate, and a sound making more than this number of 
vibrations, is too high to be heard. 

A sound must continue at a certain height or pitch for a sensible 
time, so as to be, musically speaking, appreciable as a sound. To 
continue it longer than a sensible time, makes it more or less 
musical, only in relation to preceding and succeeding sounds, 
or to the syllable or vv'ord applied to it. Hence the first thing to 
be studied in music, and the first division of music, is 

TIME. 

llie best readers, speakers, and singers, are those who know 
best how to time their words. As v/ords are signs of ideas, so 
numerals may be signs of sounds, and of musical ideas. The 
length of numerals and rests, is shown in the following table : 

Whole. Half. Quarter. Eighth. Sixteenth. Thirty-second. Swcty-fo-Ji-th, 

Si .i I 1 A 1 I 



Or, -1 .9 3 4 5 6 7 



The letter R always stands for a rest, a suspension of the voice 
during the time indicated by the periods or commas prefixed or 
suffixed to the numerals or letters. The student will perceive 
that a plain numeral or letter is called a quarter ; and that a period 
prefixed doubles it — makes it a half; and an additional peiiod 



MANUAL or NUMERAL MUSir. 5 

doubles that — makes it a whole. Also, that one comma placed 
under a plain numeral or letter, takes from it one half its length — 
reducing it to an eighth ; and that an additional comma reduces an 
eighth to a sixteenth, and so on. By remembering this, the stu- 
dent can always determine the time of a note at sight. 

While singing a musical exercise, time passes away : and tlie 
length of time thus passed away, is represented by the lines ou 
which the exercise is written. Two parallel horizontal lines make 
a staff in numeral music, thus — 



In order that many persons may sing together at once, and that 
correct accent may be observed, time is divided by perpendicular 
lines, or bars, into spaces which are called measures, thus — 



There are, in Nature, perhaps only two kinds of time. The 
first and most general is that in wliich a man walks, in which the 
pulse beats — in which a horse trots, and is called double time. 
The second is that in which a horse canters — in which a skiff is 
rov/ed, and is called triple time. Pvlusicians have fancied that there 
are also quadruple, sextuple, and various kinds of compound time. 
The student will readily perceive that quadruple is twice double, 
and that sextuple is twice triple time : and he may rest assured 
that, to compound time, is trouble for no profit. Below is a table 
of the two kinds of time, with their varieties. 

Double time- 



16 6 1 


6 6 i 


6 6 16 6 


1 6 


6 


!1 


Quadruple time. 


1st variety • 


— or double double time. 








I6666I66661 


^6661666616666 


r 



Triple time- 



666I6661666I666I666 



Sextuple time. 2d variety — or double triple time. 

r666666 I 666666 | 666666 I 666666 | 666666~ 



99»>»> >??99» >»>»»* »??>»» >5»»>> 

In the above examples the numeral 6. is used, to which the syl- 
lable La should be applied in singing. Accent is always identified 



6 MAKUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIG. 

with time § and time should always be marked by a motion of thQ 
hand or foot. The first part of every measure in all kinds and 
varieties of time, should always have the downward beat, and be 
accented, or sung loudly ; while the last part should always have 
the upward beat, and be unaccented, or, sung softly. In triple 
time the second part of the measure may have a slight accent, and 
a beat horizontally to the left. In quadruple time the singer may 
beat down — up, down — up, in each measure, accenting the third 
part of the measure as the first. Singers find it most convenient 
in sextuple time to give only two beats to the measure, accenting 
the 1st and 4th parts of each measure. Facility and ease in singing 
, this kind of time, may be acquired by counting 1 2 3 to the down- 
ward beat, and 4 5 6 to the upward beat. However, the hand 
should fall instantaneously when you say 1, and rise as quickly 
when you say 4, remaining stationary while you repeat 2 and 3, 
and 5 and 6. All motions of the hand or foot, in beating time, 
should be instantaneous, regular, and exact. 

A numeral or rest is lengthened one-half by the addition of a 
hyphen (-) to the right of it. Thus a quarter with a hyphen 

added 1- is equal to three eighths 1 1 1— a half .r- becomes equal 

» ? > 

to three quarters rrr — and an eighth I.- equal to three sixteenths 

^ 9 

111 and so on. Every additional hyphen, after the first, adds 

99 ?f >> 

one-half the amount of the hyphen preceding it, thus .1«- is 

equal to seven eighths 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 » and •!.« - - equal to fifteen 
sixteenths. » » » > > ? ? 

A tie, or slur ^^, is used to connect all the notes to be sung to 
one syllable, and, while only the first numeral, or one syllable, is 
pronounced, the sound is continued to the full time of all the syl» 
tables thus tied together. 

A triplet is three numerals sung in the time of two of the samo 

length, thus — -OIJO equal to 60. 

> ? 9 » 9 

A syncopated note is one which, by its length, or position, car- 
ries the regular accent out of, or beyond its proper place, thus — . 

ST5 or 1 666 |. 

9 9 

The small figure or figures which occur under the beginning of 
each lesson, and of every tune, will show the time of said lesson 
or tane ; and the capital letter adjoined to said figures, will show 
wmther ths exercise shall be Euiig iii !?lbw, common, or quick 



MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC. 7 

movement ; thus, 2.c means Double time, Common movement. 
3.S means Triple time Slow movement. 4.Q. means Quadruple 
time, Quick movement : and 2 3 means Double-triple, or Sextuple 
time. The letters q. r. introduced into a tune, show that from 
thence you sing with quicker movement, and s. r. stands for slower 
movement. 

The following examples, if often practised, will suffice to give 
the student a correct idea of time. 
Example L 

\~&li \ .6 16 66 I .6 I 66 I .6 i6666| ,6' 
2s '' *•' »»»» 

Example 2. 
16 6 1 6-6 1 .6 I 6 6 6° 6 I .6 16 6 6 I 6 6« I >6 II 

23 » 5 > > >9 > 9 > 

Example 3. ^ ^ 

6 6 I t> 6 i6 6 1 6 R Ui 6 1666 r| k, 6 i .6 1 

2c > 9 > 9 * 

Example 4. 

r6666N>66 R |66r6 { 6r66 | r666| 666666|666 .6|:6r 
4s »>>»>» 

Example 5. 

|;6|.6.6|6g8606i66tl066.6i 66668680 1666668.816-666-1 sef 

^Q » > > ) 5 >5 J> ) JJ }> )> J>)3 55 » ) JJ 55 5 5) 55 5 5 > 

Examples. \^^2^-^ 

[6 661 .6 6 I 6 .6 | >6" 166666 6 1 666666 |.6» || 

Example 7. 

U^66t>lli66-6|6- 66616 .6|6- 6666|66»66|666-6U6- J! 

2q > » J )» 9*1 > >> * f 9 > ♦ >> » 

Example 8- ^^ ^ ^^ . ^^ 

/ 6"6r I 6 r 6 I 66r6 | r666|6666b|k666|66r66|.6-| 1 
3^ ») >»>»»> >>»>»> 

Example 9. 
i 6- 6-i 6666 i 666666|.6«|66666|6666|66666!.6"i| 

23g 9 9 >>»J>J >?> >9 9 9 »»♦ 

Example 10. 



I 6- 661 66 6- I 06666616" r- |66k6j6 'I ^66- |6C^^r|.6"JJ 



8 MANUAL OF JfUMERAL rdUSIC. 

The singer will perceive that in the above examples, a quarte? 
note has one beat, a half note has two beats, a whole note four 
beats, in doable, triple, and quadruple time ; while in sextuple 
time, a quarter has two- thirds of a beat. In some tunes, however, 
a half note has a beat, a whole note two beats, a quarter note only- 
half a beat, &c., but why it should be so, musicians do not say- 
As every teacher has, or should have, his own method of teaching, 
he can ask questions on the above, better suited to his own plan of 
teaching, and to the circumstances of the class, than can the author 
or any other person. 

MELODY 

Is simply a succession of musical sounds which fall pleasantly 
upon the ear. It is the second grand division of the science of 
music, and teaches particularly the pitch of sounds. Melody is 
the work of genius, the effort of the imagination, and is governed 
by- no fixed rules, except those whicli govern TIME. The pea- 
sants of all countries, the music-loving servants of the Southern 
and Western States, have originated the most pleasing and lasting 
tunes. The Author knew a boy to compose extemporaneous mel- 
odies at the age of three years and before he could speak plainly. 

A succession of sounds regularly ascending, and regularly de- 
scending in a manner agreeable to the ear, is called a SCALE 
(ladder) of sounds. The scales most used at present, are the 
Grand, which is also the natural scale, and the Plaintive, which is 
an artificial scale. We shall consider the GRAND SCALE. To 
an unpractised ear, ladies and gentlemen appear to sing at the same 
pitch ; but an attentive listener can easily perceive that a lady's 
voice is higher in pitch than that of a gentleman. While a string, 
tensely stretched over supports on a soundboard, will, on being 
struck, vibrate so as to chord exactly witli any given sound a lady 
may sing : it will require a string precisely twice as long to chord 
exactly with the voice of the gentleman who aims to make the 
same sound. Suppose a string 32 inches in length to make a given 
sound, and a given number of vibrations, a string 16 inches in 
length will make just twice as many vibrations, and sound just as 
much higher as a lady's voice is, naturally, higher in pitch than a 
gentleman's voice. Any person can tell the difference between a 
male's and female's voicd. It is more easily discerned in conversation 
than in singing. Well, this difference is the limits of the Grand 
or Natural Scale : and the voice may make seven steps in going 
from oiie limit to the other ; which steps are agreeable to the ear, 
if made in a certain order, but more or less disagreeable if made in 
any other order. 

Suppose a string 32 inches in length makes 24 vibrations in a 
geconJ of time, then a string of the same size and tension, but 



MAi^UAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC, 9 

only 16 inches in length, will make 48 vibrations in a second of 
time. The sound made by the 32 inch string is called the tonic ; 
and as it subsides, the attentive listener may detect two other 
sounds, faint but still discernible. The 1st of these secondary 
sounds will be heard in full on striking a string 21 inches in length, 
and the second will be given out from a string 27 inches, provided 
all the strings are of the same size and tension. Thus, from nature 
we may derive the principal sounds of the natural scale, (viz :) 1. 
3. 5. 8. Let the following lesson be practised, in quadruple time, 
till the principal sounds of the scale are permanently fixed in the 
student's ear. 

13 5 § 31 5 § 513§ §135 

13§5 3 185 51§3 815 3 

15 3§ 351§ 5318 §3 15 

15 §3 3 5§1 53§1 §351 

1835 3815 58 13 8 5 13 

18 5 3 385 1 5831 8 5 31 

To the above principal sounds, the Scotch add 2, which is about 
midway between 1. and 3.., and which will be given from a string 
30 inches long : also 6., which is a step above 5., and will be given 
from a string 20 inches long. Thus the Scotch Scale consists of 
only six numerals, making, from the lower to the upper sound of 
the scale, three regular steps, and two skips. This may account 
for the wild sweetness of Scotch airs, 

Germans, Italians, Frenchmen, and all others who compose and 
write music, except the Scotch and Irish, unite the numerals 2. 4. 
6. and 7. with the above principal sounds of the scale. Thus we 
have the Octave (eight notes) all of which will be given by strings 
of equal size and tension, but of lengths, as follows : 

123456f8 numerals of the scale. 
32, 30, 27, 24, 21, 20, 18, 16, lengihs of the strings. 

By carefully noticing and counting the vibrations made by the 
strings which will make the regular sounds of the natural scale, or 
even by listening to the sounds when sung by a correct voice ; it 
will be seen that the steps made between the sounds differ in size. 
The step between three and four, and that between 7 and 8, are 
less than any other steps in the scale. Hence they are called half- 
steps. The following table exhibits the scale, the steps and half- 
steps, (or intervals,) the scientific names, and the musical names of 
the numerals. 



1 step, 2 


Step. 


3 J step. 4 step 5 step. 6 step. 7 | step 8 


do, ) ra, 


\ 


me, 1 fa, { sole, 1 la, [ se, j do 


;"->^ic. 1 f-af^rfonic 


r. ! M- 


■iinnt iSiib-i-^ni inapt. 1 rkwirianl, 1 Su^-niedientSuV tonic, i Oc(a\%, 



10 MANUAL 0^ NUMERAL MUSIC. 

The namss do, ra, &c., should always be applied to the numer- 
als, because,' by their euphony, they lead the student to a habit of 
correct intonation. 

1. The Tonic means the key-note, the numeral to which all 
others in a tune stand most intimately related, the note which all 
ears expect to hear at the close of a piece of music. 

2. Super-tonic means next above the tonic. (Super , above.) 

3. Mediant, middle or half way between the tonic and the 
dominant. 

4. Sub-dominant, next below the dominant. {Sub, under.) 

5. Dominant, the governing note : so called because it is oftener 
used in tunes than any other note, generally precedes the tonic, 
and leads to a cadence. 

6. Sub-mediant, middle between the octave and sub-dominant 
below. 

7. Sub-tonic, next below the tonic ; and leading note, because it 
leads to the tonic. 

8. Octave is the tonic of the next scale above ; the last of one 
scale and the commencement of another. 

After having the four principal sounds of the scale well fixed in 
the mind, the scale should be sung by 'numerals, by syllables, by 
using the single syllable — ah, in double time, at least an hour every 
day by all students. 

In numeral music, the parts of a tune are shown by letters at 
the commencement of each part. Thus, A stands for air, B for 
bass, C for counter, and D for double air (tenor.) 

The middle scale lies between the lines of the staff, the lower 
scale below the lines, and the upper scale above them. 

GRAND SCALE. 

Example 1. First or lowest Altitude, or ite?/, of the Grand Scale. 

la_ ^ t 1 

|A £ !5g I 3 4 i 5 6 I 'y 8 II y I O 5 I 4 3 I 2 1 i l 
2c 

A double bar shows the end of a strain, and the close of a lesson 
or tune. The figure above the letter at the commencement of a 
lesson or tune, shows the altitude or key ; and the capital letter 
adjo.iied, shows in what scale said lesson or tune is written. The 
above example is written in the first key, the key once thought to 
be most easy for ail voices. The upper note of the scale above 
written is exactly given by a C Tuning Fork. 

Example 2. 

2a .! ■ .1" 

^A.l 2 1 3.4 I .5 6^ ! 11 17 6514 32 j.i- (' 

^3 ' . *" 



MANUAL OF iVUMERAL MUSIC 1 T' 

The above example is in the 2d key of the Grand Scale. The 
sound of the key note here, is just precisely the sound of the 
supi^r ionic in the first example, consequently this key is one 
inter\al higher throughout than is the first key. 
Example 3. 

3& .11 I 

JA aa22i33<£4|f>5«>0i7'y II 765 1 765154321 !ii| 
4g 

Example 3 has as its tonic, or key note, the sound of the medi- 
ant of the first key ; hence the 3d key is just two degrees above 
the first key throughout. 
Example 4. 
4g- 1- 1 

|A 1 2 3 4 567 1 II ^ 70 5 4 II aai-il 

23s ' ' ? > » 9 5 5 * 

The key note of the 4th key has the same sound the sub-domi- 
nsLXit of the 1st key has ; and this key is just 3 degrees higher than 
that. 
Example 5. 

5g .1 B 

JA 12 123134 145 167 I || 7 | 76 j 65 | 54 I 32 M :> 
2c 

The dominant of the 1st key has the same pitch with the key 
note of the 5th key. 

Example 6. 

6g 

iB - I 1 I {I I I i I I 

2s 12 34 43 21 14 24 34 .1 

Example 7- 

6g 

\B i 1 I 1 2 1 3 4 I 5 6 I 5 4 I 3 2 ) ,1 II 

2s 5 6 7 

In examples 6 and 7, the music is written on the bass staff, be- 
cause very few would be able to sing it, were it written on the air 
(treble) staff. The key note in the above examples is the last note 
in example 7, and has the pitch of the sub-mediant in the 1st key , 
so this key is 5 degrees higher than that. 
Example 8. 
7g 

!B -- i "~~ ] ^~T~li ~T" , I II 

?c 8 2 2-344 432 .1- .14 2 .4 -3 2 .1- 



13 MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC 

Example 9. 

Tg 

|B I 11 It i li I 2 ;i 14 54 I .^^2 M- jl 

3c 5^6 7 7 6 .5- 

The two examples above are written in the 7th key ; and, for 
the same reasons with examples 6 and 7, on the bass staff. The 
key note is the last note in example 9, and is of the same pitch 
with the sub-tonic of the 1st key. It is six degrees higher than 
that key. 

There are, in reality, no more than seven keys. Musicians 
have, for the sake of instrumentation, so mystified the science as 
to have no 7th key at all in round or patent notes ; but, by means 
of what they term incidental flats and sharps, they have invented 
a number of keys which have no existence in point of lact. The 
student will please remember that all true principles oi soienco are 
discovered, not invented. Many inventions are uiUiSS, but some 
are useful, among which we rank the 

PLAINTIVE SCALE. 

As woman was derived from man, so is the plaintive scale de- 
rived from the grand scale : and has a peculiar softness about it 
which the grana scale does not possess. By taking the sub-medi- 
ant 6, the 3d numeral below the tonic, as a key note, and ascend- 
ing to 6 above, we find that by sharping 5, so a* to bring it v/ithin 
half a step of six, we have a pleasing scale. Then descending 
from 6 above the dominant to 6 below the tonic, we find the scale 
most pleasing without the sharp. In numeral music, S stands for 
sharp, F for flat, and N for natural. Belor-. is the 1st key, or alti- 
tude of the Plaintive Scale. 
Example 10. 
Ip 

JA 1|2 3i4 s5|6||6]5 4 13 2'^ jj 

2s 6 7 7 6 

In the above scale, the octave, that is the upper 6, or la, has the 
same pitch with the sub-mediant in the 1st key of the grand scale. 
The peculiar softness of the plaintive scale arises, principally, from 
the fact that it is only one step and a half from the tonic, (6.) to 
the mediant, (1.) in the plaintive scale ; while in the grand scale 
it is two full steps from the tonic, (1.) to the mediant, (3.) We 
shall see this more fully when we come to study the size of inter- 
vals which exceed the size of half steps and steps. 

EiXAI'lPLE 11. 

iG 



MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC. 13 



El AMPLE 12. 
1& 



I At ^2 3 I »2 '2 I ! 1 -J ^ I .S li ^ 2 i I ^ 2 1 i .S 1 |.i- 
3s 



Example 13. 

l-Gr 



jA l*ja^4|43Si|i'234U3.K || 3432 1 1324|14*el2| sM i 
4c 



EXAMPfiE J4. 
iG 



- |A i234|543-|S4i4|32i- li 13^24 | 35ll<^ | .S432| ,i"i : 
23s '*' >>? >> "» >» 



Example 15. 

iG 



I A I 2 3 I 4 5 O |l> 6 6 U5- l| 5 6 5 | 640 | 632 | .1 
3q 



Example 16. 

iG 



! A 1234156 .1^|yy66|32 .t\\ 1350176 .51^5421.1 .R JI 
4c 



Example 17- 

iG .1 11 11 



I A 1355167 I '^61.5 .R || ^7 | 66 ,5|r542| .1- H 
4c 

Example 18. 

1g 1 1 

1 A 134 I 534 I 34 j .3- || 534 I 34 I 3 45 | .1 - || 
3s 

Example 19. 

lG_ 1 

; A 121 i 323 ["512 I ,1- I 12 | 312 | 512 | .1- i| 

3c 

Example 20, 

lG__l 1 1 :1 1 1 1 

I A 1 >7 ' 3 ,7 15 .7 1 II 3 .7 15 , 7 ! 753 | si '; 
4q 



14 MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC. 



il^XAMPLE 21, 

1^ 1 




i A 1 .^ 6 1 *a f> 6 1 4 5 6 1 ..'S- II 6 5 4 1 .5 6 5 1 -3 6 j 


.!» .^1 


3s 

Example 22. 

U 1 1 .111, 



[A 1^1 5 114 16 I 12 I 35 I II y|65| 6|4^J{.Ril 

2q 

Example 23. 

iG ^ ^_1 

|A I- 2 I 3-4 I 555 I .6 i 166- I y I 552- B | .1 I! 
2s ' ' ' ' ' >> > > > » 

Example 24. 

iGr .1- 1 ^ ^ 

|A I2;|| 3-21 1.355! II 1^6 15-43 12 21 23 M- II 
3s ♦ > ' ' ? > > > 

Example 25. 
-G .1 .R 



A I i- 2 3 


3 


1 2 3 2- .5 


1 5 5 5 O 6 7 


1 II 


4c ' " 
&.1 




>» > 


> » > > 




1 7"^ \ 


5 


4 .3 1 3 


3 4 2 5 3 


1 :l II 


4q ' 
Example 26. 




y 


» 9 > 


.a- 


|A 1 23 3 


3i 


4 s 4 5- ! 


5 6 5 6 5 6 7 


1 il 


3q ' " ' 


> 


9 
1 


J > > 9» 9> J » 




1 F 7 6 N 


Y 


i 6 5-1 


3 4 5 4 3 2 i 


.1- II 


23s » 
Example 27 


9 
1 


11 


>>>??? 

1 





1 1 2 3 455167 r^^^'y6.6|. 5115343 21135521 6! 42MJ| 

2q 

EXTENSION OF THE SCALE. 

Example 28 

?G 1 12354 ;5 5432 1 

11234 1567 I ^ M Jl I 765 15- 432-i;l 11 

4e ' ' 



MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC. 15 



Example 29. 
la 




}B 1 i 1 \zl ii l?^2 ill 1 


sll 


4c 7Q5 54.3 345ir 7 6.5 5-561' 
Example 30. » 
iG 1 12.3 531 


IA135 i .< 6125 115-63-4 12- .1 | 135 | 


:lli 



4c ''57 

INTERVALS. 
A half step is a Minor Second. A whole step is a Major Second. 

Example 31. 

iG 1 .1 



|A I 2 1 2 3 1 


1 3 4 1 4 5 1 


1 5 6 1 


67 1 


1 7 1 


2c ma ma 
Example 32. 
ip 


mi ma 


ma 


ma 


mi 


iA6 5 1 5 4 


14 3 1 3 2 


1 2 1 


1 1 


1 t i' 



2c ma ma mi ma ma mi 7 7 6 .6 

ma 
A whole step and a half constitute a Minor Third : two whole 
steps a Major Third. 
Example 33. 
1& 1 2 .1 



lA 1 3 1 2 4 


1 3 5 


1 4 6 


1 5 7 


1 6 


1 7 1 


11 


2c ma mi 
Example 34. 
Ip 


mi 


ma 


ma 


mi 


mi 




lA 1 1 2 i 


fi 3 1 


2 4 i 


3 r% 1 


46 1 


6s 5 1 


.6 li 



2s 6 7 mi ma mi mi ma 

mi 
A Perfi5Ct Fourth is 2 steps and a half ; a Sharp Fourth consists 
of 3 steps. 
Example 35. 
IG 1 2 3 2l 



lA 1 4 1 25 1 36 1 47 1 5 1 €J 


1 7 


! 11 


2c p p p s P P 
3 2 1 


P 




1 7 1 6 1 5 17 4 16 3 15 2 1 


4 a 


\t t } 



2c p 



£6 Manual of numeral music. 

A Perfect Fifth is 3 steps and a half ; a Fiat Fifth is 2 steps 
and 2 half steps. 

Example 36- 

iG a 2 3 4 .1 



!A 1 5 


1 26 i 3 7 i 4 15 ! 6 1 7 


! !• 


2c p 
la 5 1 


P P P P P t' 

4 3 2 1 




J 


71 61 5 1 417314 I 


.1 !1 



2c p f p p p p f 7 

A Major Sixth consists of 4 steps and a half; a Minor Sixth of 
3 steps and 2 half steps. 



Example 37. 

la 12 3 4 


5 


.1 


A 1 6 1 2 7 1 3 14 15 [6 


7 i 


!l 


2c ma ma mi ma ma mi 
1g5 4 3 2 1 


mi 




1 7 i 6 1 5 1 4 1 3 1 72 1 


6 1 1 


• S II 



2cmi mi ma ma mi ma ma 

A Flat Seventh consists of 4 steps and 2 half steps ; a Sharp 
Seventh of 5 steps and 1 half step. 

Example 38. 

iG I 2 3 4 5 .1 5 4 3 2 1 

|A"i7|2 13 14 15 16 || | 6| 5| 41 3| 21711. Bi l 
2c s f f s f f f f s f t s 

A unison is a repetition of the same note. An Octave is a per- 
fect interval of 5 steps and 2 half steps. Perfect intervals are such 
as perfectly satisfy the ear. They are the Unison, the Octave, 
the Fifth, and the Fourth. 

The Ninth is the Tonic (1) and the Octave of the Super-tonic. ^'2) 

The Tenth " " (") " " " Mediant. (3) 

The Eleventh " (") " " " Sub-dominant. (4) 

The Twelfth " (") " " " Dominant. (5) 

The Thirteenth " (") " " " Sub-mediant. (6) 

The Fourteenth " (*0 " " " Sub-tonic. (7) 
The Fifteenth is the double octave, &c. 

There are also superfluous intervals, caused by the introduction 
of flats and sharps into a tune ; in order to understand which, we 
may first notice an artificial scale called the 



MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC. 



17 



CimOMATlC SCALE. 



Example 39. 

Is 1 


.1 


Ilsi;*2s2|3414s4|5s5|6s6|7 1 


II 


I 


i ) T F 7 M> F CS 1 -^ F .5 [ 4 3 I 3 F 3 1 2 F 2 1 


a li 



2c 

The letter S before a numeral raises it a half step, and changes 
the termination of the syllal^le to ee. F before a note flats or 
Gepresses it a half step, and changes the termination to a, except 
the syllable ra, which it changes to aw. A sharp or flat affects all 
the same syllables which follow in the measure ; also the syllables 
in following measures if no other syllable intervene. A natural 
restores a numeral to its primitive sound and name. 

A superfluous second consists of a step and a chromatic half step. 



A super/luous third 
A diminished third 
A diminished fourth 
A superfluous Jifih 
A superjiuous sixth 
A diminished sixth 
A diminished seventh 



two steps 

half step ' " 
one step, one half and a 

three steps " ** 

four steps " " 

two steps, two " 

three steps " " 



SUPERFLUOUS INTERVALS are major intervals with the 
upper steps sharped, or the lower steps flatted. 

DIMINISHED INTERVALS are minor intervals with the 
upper steps flatted or the lower steps sharped. 

SHARPED INTERVALS have their upper steos sharped. 

FLATTED INTERVALS have their upper steps flatted. 

IMPERFECT INTERVALS are such as are not entirely satis- 
factory to the ear. 

THE SMALLEST INTERVAL lies between a sharped step 
below and a flatted step next above, as from s2 to f3. It is called 
a quarter step. 

INVERSION OF INTERVALS is transposing a note from 
below and placing it above any given note. Thus a unison may 
become an octave, a major interval may become minor, &c, 

INVERSION. 



Dh-ect. 


Inverted. 


Direct. 


Inverted 


unison, 


octave, 


octave, 


unison, 


second, 


seventh, 


seventh, 


second, 


third, 


sixth, 


sixth, 


third. 


fourths 


Mth, 


• mh 


fourth. 



IS MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC. 

It is important that the studftBt sliould bo well versed in the 
kiiov/ledge of intervaia, iii order to uiiaeibland the distinctivB 
character of the (minor) Plaintive scale. 

The plaintive scale is always a minor third lower than its rela- 
tive (major) grand scale. 

While the grand scale always has 1 (do) for its tonic, the tonic 
{key note) of the plaintive scale is always 6 (la.) The grand scale 
has no flats or sharps in it, but the plaintive scale must have its 
sub-tonic sharped in ascending, though not in descending. 

The grand scale abounds in major thirds, but in the plaintive 
scale the thirds are minor ; the sixths and sevenths may generally 
be minor also in the plaintive scale. 



Example 40. 
3p 


Example 41. 
3g 




A 1 2 1 .3 


.3 11 il A.I 3 4 1.5.5 


1 3 2.1 tl 


4c ,6 

3p ■ H !^ H 


7 .6 4c 

^ B ^ g B B ►d 




B 1 .1 


1 II B .1 1 ^J 1.3. 1 


.1 1 



4c .(5 6 "^r ,6 3 3 O 4c 5 5 

In the above example is given one strain of the tune " Wina- 
ham," both in the plaintive and grand scales. It is sufficient, 
giving only the air and bass, to show that the minor intervals pre- 
dominate in the plaintive scale. By consulting plaintive tunes iu 
the Christian Psalmist, published by the writer, or in the JMumeral 
Singer, published by Morton and Grisvvold, Louisville, Ky., tho 
difference between the plaintive and grand scales can be most 
clearly seen. 

ORNAMENTS 

Are numerals, and characters, and letters, sometimes introduced 
into a tune to give graceful expression to certain passages, but 
they do not belong to the harmony of the tune. 



Example 42. 
is 


1 » 


Loud P 
11 .1 


IA6 5 5413423 ! 


3 s 4 . 5 


1 1^5 1 ,K h 






1 1 .1 


^A O 5 54 3- 4 2 -3 


3 ii s 4 K 


.5 1 -y 5 • .R 11 



4g 



MANUAL OF NUMEKAL MUSIC. 19 

Example 43. 

tr tr t t St P 

5 4 3 3 •! .S :l 



4s 




565454 343 232 


a21212 1 2 1 2 I 2 1 2,2 si 


1 » »5»> » M >» > »»»» J »> »» 1 


1 >>»>>»» »> »»> >» »»» Jjy >»» »? >» 957 j 1 j 



4s 7 1 

*>> j» 

In the 42d example, leaning notes occur in the first half of the 
first measure, and transient or passing notes in the last half of that 
measure. A Uaning note should be sounded but not pronounced, 
and have half the time of the note which follows ; while a passing 
note has one-fourth the time of the note which precedes it, and 
should be sounded but not pronounced. 

Over the 1st two notes in the 2d measure are marks of accent. 
These notes should be struck quickly and boldly, and have only 
half the time in which they are written. 

The third measure should be sung loud. The letter P, over the 
numeral in the 4th measure, stands for prolong ^ and the singer may 
prolong that numeral at pleasure. 

The letters tr stand for trill: the letters sh stand for shake. A 
trill is performed by sounding the numeral above, and repeating 
the numeral commenced on within the time. A shake is a repeti- 
tion of the principal numeral with the one above or below, as 
often as the singer chooses within the proper time. The upper 
staffs of examples 42 and 43 show how the music is written ; the 
lower stafis show how it may be sung. The word " soft " means, in 
numeral music, precisely what it says. The words swell, increase^ 
diminish, very loud, very soft, &c., are generally understood, and 
suit an American work much better than Crescendo, Diminuendo^ 
Fortissimo, &c., &c. 



Example 44. 

la P I Loud P_ 

|A 1 1 213341 51^1,1! ^6 5 I 56 5^31 



2s 



» » > » 9 



1g Increase Diminish 1 Very L oud t 

i 15 5 6 5 10 5 3 3 2 11 ^@ 5 3 4 6 | 5 5 O €1 IT .: 

A .^ >» >» r* t 9 9 9 9 9 9 



ic 



20 MANUAL OF NUMKUAL MUSIC 

Example 45. 



1 A 1 S 5 2 


1 S 3 5 S 


J_ 3 4 7 4—] 1 5 a (1 


1- 




/^ ■> r" '^^ H 


1 I' 6 5 1 


.1- /f ?& a 1 


Jl 4 5 4 »^ 6 7 5 li 


4g ' 

Example 46. 


9 


» >? t» »9 »J Jf f? »» 

i 


1 A i S @ II 


1 2 4 -r 4 


1 s 5 5 1 .7 .H ; 


I .--"-- 


, , , 


. .1- 



1 /^7@554 1I^J 1*2845 I 5-4 3-4 554-S 2-^ 44| 5i:li. 

j"p »? >» T» •>> ?? y? 5» ?» >» J? >> 99 ?»> >? >?> > > ?> >>» 9? 5»J 9 > 



Example 47. 


I 


'J 


.1 


i A 1 4 ^ 4 I 


! 2 5 .^ i 


3 6 6 1 


•R r 


li^jTF "" 


,^2-. ^2^ 


.-2-. ^2-. <-2- 


1 



' ' ^65-543 I i^J3 443s45 ' 5s456s56y@1^5 | ,K«|i 

^Q »»»>9»9 >?5 ?9> 99J919S99 



Example 48. 

iG 1 




S 3 


.1 


i A 15 5 


1 


2 6 6 1 3 -r 


^ 1 .K II 


1- I I 


" " 5- 5 5 


16-662-2214-44 1 :i |i 


4 c " 
Example 49. 


9J 


J9 JJ ?» 9> »> 

3 14 


99 99 


i A 1 6 6 


I 


2 7 ^ 1 S 


1 1 .5 .K li 


£-2 3 5. 


i- 






' ' 1 




^65-13-12- 12 


3 4 5 1 Jl )| 


ic 
Example 50- 


I 


» > > 99 » ly >» >> 

2 3 4 


99 99 9 1^ 

5 :1 


i A 1 7 *J 




13 4 15 


6 1 if 


ail 




, ^ 





4c 



MaKUaL of KfrMEKAL MUSIC. 



ARTICULATION. 



Singers shouk- never perform as if they had their mouths partly 
fille.v! '.vith liot niu§h, but should articulate so clearly as to pro- 
nounce every word distinctly. Many there are, who, by joining 
the consonant of the last word with the vowel commencing tlie 
next, so make a new word that never had an existence except in 
their singing. Hence their singing cannot be understood. They 
make much sound and noise, but the listeners hear no manifesta- 
tions of sense. I have listened, while these fashionable mouthing- 
drawling singers would go through with an entire hymn, without 
being able to catch a single verse. They present to the ear what 
the man presented to the eye, who wrote the following as an 
excuse, to a teacher, for a lad who missed a day from school : 

** Staidathomeadiggingtaters.' ' 

Others there are whose voices lie mostly in their noses ; and, 
though they may pronounce distinctly, yet, with their sharp ring- 
ing nasal twang, they fail to give any expression to their pro- 
nunciation. 

In order to vocalize fully, firmly, and purely, the singer should 
hold his head erect ; standing is the best posture ; take deep and 
full breath ; exert the abdominal and dorsal muscles to expel tha 
sound through the throat, and never begin one word till the pre- 
ceding is completely articulated. Students should commence 
vocalizing with the teeth far enough apart to set 4 fingers, edge- 
v;is8, between them ; and alv/ays have them far enough apart to 
admit one finger freely. 

Thus the student will avoid all labial, dental, and nasal sounds. 
After a free, full, certain, and pure tone is acquired, the student 
may turn his attention to the sentiments of the words he sings. 
The marks, characters, words, &c., added to the tune will aid 
somevv^hat in acquiring the ELOCUTION of music, but a singer 
must depend mostly on his own judgment. Every singer, like 
every orator, should have his own STYLE in singing ; and there 
are no two verses, perhaps, in any hymn or song, that should bo 
sung precisely in the same style. Common seuvse must determine 
when and where the voice should be grave or cheerful in tone. 

Example 51. 

iG , ^ . ^ 



lA.i 1 12 34 32 1 ta.Pv 


1 .2 2 12 34 54 3 I 22.r:i 


1» f^ J> >? 19 9» »» J9 

" Mark it. 


99 5> 99 5> ?» >> J> 99 

Take all. 


' 


~^ 


. .332 1 2 34 ^'i* 1 33. R ! 


.4 4 34 5 <^ 54 3 1 44 .i<) 



4q ♦♦ »» " " »» " '» >' 9» »> »» >J »> 99 99 99 ' 

Tell it. To 



22 MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC. 

Example 53. 



7g . . 


1 


1 A .5 5 4 3 4 5 e 7 6 j 5 5 .R 


1 .6 e 5 6 7 " 7 « 5 1 6 6 .R ii 


99 99 59 99 99 99 99 99 

Take him. 


99 99 99 99 99 99 99 

Love ^ her. 


121 


.11 12 1 1 1 


1 .'y ^ 6 7 " " " ^ 6 1 77.K I 


1 " '3' " '' " 7 6 "^ 1 r!) 



4q >S 9> J> ?♦ » 9> 9» 9» 9» 

Come in. An end. 

Examples 51 and 52 are to be practised with great care, ana 
often repeated. In the application of words to numerals, one syl- 
lable of a word, or a word of one syllable, should be applied to 
every numeral that is disconnected from all other numerals. But 
when numerals are tied together, all the numerals so tied are 
applied to one syllable. In the above examples, there are ten 
numerals and five beats to the first word, and one numeral and 
one beat to the second word, in each two measures. The student 
should articulate all the numerals on first practising the above, 
then articulate only the first, but sound all the rest. In applying 
the words, do not sing markit, but mark it ; not takall, but take 
all, &c. 

H A R M O N y 

Is the third grand division of the science of music. It treats of 
the arrangement of sounds so as to form chords, and of the agree- 
able progression of those chords. While Melody is the gift of 
nature, Harmony is to be acquired by art. Any person can learn 
to harmonize a melody, while to originate a melody requires an 
effort of genius not possessed by all. Sounds which differ in pitch, 
when heard together, produce either an agreeable or a disagreeable 
effect on the ear. If agreeable, we say the sounds constitute a 
CHORD. If disagreeable, we call it a DISCORD. Some 
chords are more disagreeable than others. Hence, we have perfect 
chords and imperfect chords. COMMON CHORDS are those which 
embrace none but consonant intervals, and consist of a funda- 
mental numeral, its third, its fifth, and usually its octave. Every 
numeral of the scale may have its common chord, its major chord, 
its minor chord, and its imperfect chord. 

Perfect chords and common chords are the same. 

Direct chords have the fundamental numeral the lowest. 

Major chords are direct chords, whose essential interval is major 

Minor chords are direct chords, whose essential interval is minor. 



MANUAL or irUMEEAL MUSIC, 23 

Imperfect chords are those which, though not discordant, do not 
entirely please the ear. 

Inverted chords are those which have the fundamental numeral 
transposed into the upper parts. If the lowest numeral in the 
chord be the 1st numeral of the chord (or the third) above the fun- 
damental numeral, It is called tha |st inversion ; if the 1st numeral 
in the chord be the 2d numeral of the chord, (or the Jifth) it is 
called the 2d inversion, and so on. 



COMMOM CHORDS. 



Example 53 


5 


6 


3 


4L 


1 


2 



"t 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


5 
3 


6 


i 


1 


2 


3 


4 


^ 


6 


7 


1 


Mediant. 


SubD. 


Dom. 


Sub M. 


SubT. 


Tonii 



Tonic. Super T. 

Above are given the chord of the tonic, super-tonic, and medi- 
ant, all of which lie within one scale ; and the sub-dominant, 
dominant, sub-mediant, and sub-tonic, which last, in this arrange- 
ment, go out of the 1st scale up into the 2d. The above are called 
close chords, because they have the fundmnental numeral lowest, 
the third in the middle, and the fifth the highest. 

The chord of the tonic is a major chord, because its first or 
loicer third is major. So are the chords of the sub-dominant and 
dominant. 

The chords of the super-tonic, mediant, and sub-mediant are 
minor chords, because their lower or first third is minor. 

The chord of the sub-tonic is an imperfect chord, because it con- 
sists of a third and a false or flat fifth, that is, of two minor thirds. 
It is ranked, by some, among the discords, but not so by all musi- 
cians. However, it must always be followed by a perfect chord. 

The above chords may be inverted thus : 



E^f AMPLE 54. 




^ 








5 


1 


3 


6 


2 


4 


3 


5 


1 


4 


6 


2 


1 


3 


5 


2 


4 


6 


Tonie. 1st In. 2d In. 


Super T. 


1st In. 2d In. 


They may also be dispersed, ai 


id placed 


in positions as follows 


Example 55, 






3 


5 ' t 1 


5 


7 


3 


5 


1 


3 


7 


3 


5 


1 


3 


5 


3 


5 


7 


1st Pofiit=-on. 


2a P. 


3d P. 


1st P. 


2d p. 


SdP. 



24 



BIANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSIC 



In the 1st position of a dlspeised chord, the fundamental- Is 
lowest, the fifth in the middle, and the third highest. In the 2d 
position, the 3d is lowest, the 1st is in the middle, and the 5th is 
highest. In the 3d position, the dominant is below, the medicint 
in the middle, and the tonic above. 

A major chord is changed into a minor chord by flatting its 
lower third ; and a minor chord is changed into a major chord by- 
sharping its lower third. 

Example 56. 



5 


5 


6 


6 


2 


2 


3 


3 




3 


F3 


4 


s4 


7 


F^ 


I 


si 




1 


a 


2 


2 


5 


5 


6 


6 




major. 


minor. 


minor. 


m£yor. 


major. 


minor. 


minor. 


major. 





Example 57. 



.1 



.5 


.6 


• 5 


.5 


1 










.3 


.3 


.2 


.3 


.3 .5 
.1 .3 


.6 


.5 


.7 


.5 


.i 


.1 




.1 


.4 


• 1 


.5 


.i 1 



2s. .7 

Example 58. 





.3 


.2 .1 


.1 ,1 


,1 .2 


.1 


.3 .4 : 


I . 


.5.6 
.3.4 

.S.l 


.7 

.4 .5 
.2 .1 


.7 
.5 


.3 .3 


.7 


1 -^ 
.6 .5 

.1 


.1 M 

.2 


:I 



4c .5 .i .7 .5 .5 

The student should study the above chords so as to be able to 
tell which is perfect, which imperfect, direct, dispersed, &,c. 

DISCORDS 

Are those chords which are, more or less, unpleasant to the ear. 
The chord of the 7th (sub-tonic) is least offensive, and enters most 
largely into musical composition. All other discords should be 
prepared by having the discordant numeral appear in the preced- 
ing concord, and all discords should be resolved by having a 
concord to follow immediately. 

Example 59. 



:1 



.1 



•I 



.5 .6 


.0 


.7 










.7 


:5 


.3 .4 


.4 


.4 


:3 


.5 


.3 


.7 


.e 


:3 


.i .1 


.2 


.2 


:i 


.3 


.i 


,4 


.4 


:i 



4c 



The 2d, 7th and 9th are naturally discordant, and any note in the 
scale may be made artificially discordant, by using it in a dis- 
cordant relation to any other note. Tke major second may bo 



MANUAL OF NUMERAL BlUSIC 



21 



resolved by any concord except the octave : the minor seconii 
should be resolved into the 3d. 



Example 60. 

iG 




1 






A. 5 i .@ 
.3 1 .4 


1 *^ 1 

1 .s ! 


R 7 
.5- 


6^6 

.4- 


s .5- |i 


•2c 

iG 

B R 1 


1 1 


3c 






1 R 




1 11 


2c 5 54 


.5 


3c .5 


5.4 


.5- 



In Ex 60, the discord of the major second, which occurs in the 
2d measure, is prepared by the dominant occurring in the first 
measure, and resolved into the full chord of the mediant in the 3d 
measure. In the triple measure, the minor second is prepared by 
the octave and 6th, and resolved by the chord of the 3d. The dis- 
cord of the 9th has been treated of ; the discord of the 9th is the 
octave of the 2d, and should be treated in like manner. Having 
thus spoken, briefly, of discords, we proceed to consider 



COMPOSITIOIS'. 



EXAMP 

1g 


le61. 
.2 










.1 




A. 5 
,3 


.7 ! 


:5 
:3 


.5 

.3 


.6 

.4 


:5 
:3 


.5 

.3 .3 


:5 

:3 


4c 

1G 


.£ 


.5 1 


:l 1 


• 1 


.1 


M 1 


1 .1 


SI i 



In the above example, the 5th is the fundamental numeral of 
the 2d chord ; and each succeeding chord has 5 of the preceding 
chords as its fundamental numeral. Hence, any chord may be 
followed by a chord constituted on its Jifth. The chord of the Jiflh 
is called the dominant chord. The fundamental notes of the above 
chords are as follows : 1st, the tonic ; 2d, the dominant, or 5th 
above ; 3d, the tonic, or 5tii below ; 4th, the tonic again ; 5th, the 
sub-dominant, or 5th below the tonic ; 6th, the tonic, or 5th above 
the sub-dominant ; 7th, the tonic again ; 8th, the dominant, or 
5th dispersed ; 9th, the tonic, or 5th belov>^ the dominant chord. 
The dominant chord, or chords, always lead us to expect the chord 
of the tonic, and is, therefore, called the lfading chord. 



SG 



MANU/iL OF NUMEEAL MUSIG. 



Example 62. 



•1 .1 



.3 .4 :3 .5 :5 

.1 .1 :l .i .5 It 



!A .5 1 t^ 
1 .3 .6 1 :3 


.5 .6 


.5 ! 


1! ..! 


il 


|4c 


|B .1 .4 j :1 II .3 4 1 :3 || 


.5 6. 


:5 !l .3 .a 


sSI 



I4c 

From the above succession of chords, it may be seen that any 
chord may be followed by a chord based on its fourth. The chord 
of the fourth is called the RELATIVE MAJOR, or sub-dominant 
chord. 



Example 63. 
IG -1 


2g 


5a 


.1 


4g 




A. 5 ! 25 


II -6 .-r 


:6 II .2 .Y 




II .i .6 


:6|| 


4c 
Id 


C .3 3 1 :3 


II .4.5 


:4 II .^.5 


:5 


11 .6 .4 1 


:4ll 


4e 
1g 




.1 








B .1 1 :1 


II .tl 


:tl (1 .5 .3 


1 :3 


II .4 .2 


:t|| 


4g .6 


.7 











Example 63 teaches that any chord may be followed by a chord 
founded on its 6th. The chord of the 6th, or sub-mediant, is called 
the RELATIVE MINOR chord. 

The tonic, or key note, is the most important note in the scale ; 
end the tonic chord is the most important in writing tunes. It 
occurs 15 times in " Old Hundred." 

The fifth, or dominant, is next in importance ; and the dominant 
chord occurs more frequently in tunes than any other, except the 
tonic chord. It is found 9 times in " Old Hundred.'* 

The fom'th, or sub-dominant, is next in importance and use. 

The sixth, or sub-mediant, the principal chord of the relative 
minor key, is the 3d in relative importance to the tonic. 



THOROUGH BASS 

Is a numeral system of music ; but without any marks to de- 
note the length of the numerals. It was invented in 1605, and 
was always considered, by eminent musicians, a most useful inven- 
tion. And yet, after near 250 years, there are some musicians. 



iMANUAL OF NUMERAL MtTSIC, 



^7 



who pretend to be too scientific to sing numeral music, and sneer 
nt it as a trifling innovation that will soon pass away I 

In 1827, Frederick Christoph Seibert, of Weisbaden, in Ger- 
many, wrote a book, for the use of the Lutherans of that country, 
using only one line for a staff; thus : 



41 



-5s5- 



-Q-Q- 



-5- 



1—5—5— 



—3-2- 



5 5 



1 1 1 b32 



1 



-6-7- 



— r-3-1— 



-1- 



The upper figure to the left of the brace shows the key, and the 
lower figure shows that a quarter numeral has one beat. The 
plain medium figure is a quarter note, the large figure is a half 
numeral, and the eighth numeral is known by a stem and a dash. 
The letters r, s, and b, stand for rest, sharp, and flat. 

Day and Beall, of Boston, have, within a few years past, taken 
out a patent for a system very similar to the above. 

Pease and others have systems more like Professor T. Harrison's 
system ; and all the above use certain marks, as commas, dashes, 
periods, hyphens, &c., to show the length of the notes. 

I have lately received the Phonetic Class-book, by Alexander 
Hall, who writes his music on what he calls a "full staff; thus : 



Jt 1. 



.5«i 



^-f 



TTri' 









SK 



~rr~ 



Tfrrr 



77- 



1 1^5 



-^-|-?4: 



.OS 



"^TITX 



In the lOth century of the Christian Era, eight and nine lines 
were used as a staff, so that Mr. Hall's staff is not so full as others 
have been. He states, in his " Defence of the Phonetic System 
of Music," that the idea of " open and shut figures," seems not to 
have suggested itself to the minds of some of the great musics! 
reformers of modern times. Now I cannot answer for the " great 
musical reformers," nor do I know to whom Mr. Hall refers ; but 



28 MANUAL OF NUMERAL MUSI©, 

I recollect distinctiy that an old lady suggested that Identical idea 
to me, years before the appearance of the Phonetic Class-Book. 
Mr. Hall is an energetic and talented christian preacher, and I 
doubt not that he will, both by his influence and energy, advance 
the cause of n meral music. And, should the phonetic system 
obtain generally, the paper-makers will rejoice in being required 
10 furnish vastly more paper for musical purposes than they do at 
present. 

SCALES. 

The first scale used in written music was the tetrachord, next 
the pentachord, then the hexachord. Seventy years before the 
Christian Era, the heptachord, or two conjunct tetrachords, came 
into use: and, perhaps about the year 100, two disjunct tetrachords 
making our present octave^ obtained, and has been in use evei 
since. 

Solmization means giving names to notes or numerals while 
singing them. The Greeks used the syllables tah, tee, to, toy in 
solmization. In the 11th century. Guide, a monk of Aretino, in- 
vented the use of the syllables ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la in solmization. 
The Italians substituted do in the place of ut, and the French 
added the syllable si, thus perfecting the solmization of the octave, 
which, for centuries gone by, has entirely superseded the hexa- 
chordic solmization of Guide. 

CADENCE. 

A cadence is in music what a pause is in reading. It gives rest 
and relief to the ear. An imperfect cadence is the chord of the 
dominant, often found at the end of a strain. A perfect cadence 
is where the tune falls from the chord of the dominant to the com- 
mon or tonic chord, and there ends. 

CHANT, 

A kind of melody half way between talking and singing, to 
which either verse or prose may be applied. 

CANTO, 

The Italian for song. If the author had either time or space, 
and the reader were willing to pay for rubbish, a great maiiy bar- 
barous and useless mystifications might be translated into plain 
English. 



r©r Sale by S. W. LEONARD, or MORTON & GRISWOLD, LonisYiUii 

THE CHRISTIAN PSALMIST. 

More than 500 of the best hymns in the English language^ wf 
appropriate music in Numeral notation. 

PRICE : 

In Sheep binding, $400 00 per thousand 

*"•"'■ t^ 45 00 per hundred. 

" " " - - 6 00 per dozen. 

" " '* -..---- 75 per copy. 

In Morocco, gilt and embossed, . - - - 8 00 per dozen. 

''■ " '< " 100 per copy. 

" " extra " «..-.- 10 00 per dozen. 

'''<'*»' ."....- 1 25 per copy. 



THE CHRISTIAN YOCALIST. 

A book of Sacred and Secular Songs, with Numeral Music. 

PRICE : 

In Sheep binding, - - S?5 00 per dozen. 

" *' " , - - 50 per copy. 



THE SELECT MELODIES. 

A very popular Methodist Hymn Book, by WILLIAM HUNTEB 
with Numeral Music. 

PRICE : 
In Roan binding, - - - - - - - -$4 80 per dozen. 

<' " " 60 per copy. 

In Morocco, gilt and embossed. 8 00 per dozen. 

" " '*' 100 per copy. 



THE NUMERAL SINGER. 

A book of Sacred and Secular Songs, Numeral and Round Note Music. 

PRICE : 

In boards, $2 00 per dozen. 

'*'' •- ..,..-. 25 per copy. 

NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

PRICE : 

In boards, - - - fi?4 00 per dozen. 

**** <.- Otn) per copy. 



THE NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



THE WIDOW'S APPEAL, l. 



1p p 



6i65 3-3 I 5 5 5«3|5553| ^ 76(1 



Stay, stay thy hand — tempt him not, For he is all that's left to me^ 

The sunshine of my lonely lot. The partner of my misery — 

1p p rep 



C 6 


3 3 1-1 


122 2-11331 (123 


1 


23 9 


9 9 9 99 


9 9 9 9? 9 9 9 6 999 
9 p 




Ip P 


111 


VERY CLOW. 

2 2 2-1 3-21- 1 




A 6 


1 9 9 9 6 


1 9 9 9 99 1 9 99 9 6 1 9 7 6 


II 


2s > 


9 


99 9 9 




My youngest born. His father's pride — 0, tempt him not. Take all beside. 




Ip P 




VERY SLOW. 




G 3 


5 5 5 3 i 


5 5 5-3 1 6- 5 3- 2 1 1 2 3 





2 Take all beside, but leave my boy, 

Nor tempt him vritb the accursed bowl ; 
He is the widow's only joy, 
The solace of her troubled soul! 

Father and friend I O spare the boy 
Thy victim fell — | 1 love so weiL 

3 Thrice have I seen the cold grave yawn, 

And swallow, in its darkest gloom, 
The forms I 've loved from earliest dawn — 
And thou, alas, didst seal their doom, 

The tempting bowl I And all was dona 
Thy hand didst hold, \ For paltry gold. 

4 Those painful scenes I can forget, 

Tliis bruised heart can heal again; 
And burning tears shall no more wet 
These pallid cheeks so sunk with pain: 

All is forgiven I By thy hope of heaven, 

li thou 'It but swear, j Thou wilt forbea^ 



32 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 And tempt no more my darlins: boy 
To taste those bitter dregs of woe, 
No more the mother's peace destroy, 
But onward let thy footsteps go, 

To seek the lost, I And joy shall crown 

From virtue's ways, j Thy future days ! 



JEAI^NETTE AND JEANNOT. 



(6g 



A 12|33«3-3|3 3- 4153 1" 21333144 4-4143 3- 3 I 

120 > » » 5 » 9> > 99 9 9 9 »> 9 9 9 9 9 »> 9 9 9 99 

You are going far away, far away from wife and child, 

There is no one left to love me now, tliough 

I6g /^ ^ 

A 3 2 2- si I a 1 2 I 3- 3 3 3 I 3 3 4 I 5 3 1 2 I 3 3 5 I 5 4 3 2 I 1- 1 3 | 

I2c»»» '» »' >»99 99 9999 99 >>»> »7'6 

99 

once on me you smiled ; But my heart shall t)e with you 

wherever you may go, Can you look me in the face and say the 

1 6q /^-\ 

A 3 3- 2 I 1 II R l|2-sl23|2 1|2-1 2 3|255|5 | 

120 > > »9 9 7 99 9 99 9 9 7 9 9 99 9 9 » > 9 7 7 7 

99 9 9 9 9 

same? Ah, no! When you told me how you loved, 

ah ! I never felt afraid, That you ever would for. 

|6g p 

1 A /^ 3- 3 I 3 2- 1- I 1..2|3333|33 3-4|53 1-2|335[ 

|2C 7 is 9 99 »9 9 ' 6 5 ' 9' 9 9 ^ ' 9 9 9 9> 9 9 9 99 9 9" 

> » >> 

get all the promises you made ; And when in our village church, 

my love, we knelt down side by side. We there 

.60 P 

JA54 3 2i4321|l l-2 | 335|5 432|4 3 21il 3..2|1 } 

i2"c 9 > » » > » » > 9 7 » 99 » > }• 9 » » > > » » > 7 9 >» 

9 9 

vowed to love each other true, and I hecame your bride, 

We there vovred to love each other true, and I became your bride. 

2 But how^ changed the scene since then, and you still keep drinking on, 

Never thinking if it kills you my happiness is gone ; 

You've been drinking all the day — ah I never thought to see 

The time that you would use me so — what will become of me ? 

If you would give up drink, and for pleasure cease to roam, 

You'd have no hungry, sickly child, nor weeping wife at home ; 

W^e should live at home in peace, and you know it would be right; 

So stay at home, my husband dear, and don't go out to-night. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTBH. 33 

FAREWELL TO THE CUP. 

Air — NeiD Home. 
5g $ 1st time. 2d & 4th time. 



A 1 I 3 1 1 I I 1 1 I 3 II 1 I 1113 



6 5 5 6 » ' 

9 9 9 9 

Farewell to the cup, we have tarried too long, ) And the thoughts that 
Where the juice of the grape adds its witeh'ry to song, j flowed so 

oG $ 1st time. 2d & 4th time. 

b"! I 1 1 1 I ri~i I 1 1 i 1 irT~i I rj 



5 5 5 6 

9 9 9 



And our brains become heavy— farewell to the bowl. 
And our brains become heavy — farewell to the bowl. 



5a 


/'^ 


REP. Is. 










REP. Is. 


A 5 5 5 


5 3 2 1 


1 3 1 


R 


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2s 9 9 

freely are sombre and dull, Fare - well to the bowl. 

5a /^N REP. Is. REP. Is. 



K 11112 1- I II .2 I 



2s 9 »' 9 7 6 5 6 5 



2 No longer the eye beams with intellect's fires, 
No longer the tongue fancy's power inspires ; 
But flushed is the brow and degraded the soul, 

And our minds have departed — farewell to the bowl. 

3 Oh, tarry no longer where joy flies away, 

And the heart and the soul lose their richest array, 
Where eye mocketli eye, as unmeaning they roll, 
And the tongue whispers folly — farewell to the bowl 

4 Oh, think if the maiden who smiles in thine eyes, ^ 
Once saw thy proud mind in this shameful disguige ; 
How her heart would reject thee, how sadly her soul 
Would pity and leave thee — oh, flee from the bowl. 

5 O think, ere the moment of thinking is past. 
And the chains of the mighty upon thee are cast, 
Return — ere the iron shall enter the soul, 

And thy whole life beside be — a curse on the bowl. 
•• ' ■ ■ '3 



34 



NATIONAL TEMPERAXCE SONGSTER. 



REFLECTION. 

Am — All is Well. 



60 ^ 


/^s 


/^\ 


/- . 


P /^N 




REP. /-^ 


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1- 1 2 


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9 9 9 9 




7 



9 
Why have I now such deep distress ? Is it Hum ? Is it Rum ? j 
Does happy health no longer bless ? Is it Kum ? Is it Kum ? j 

G $ ^--s /-> . , REP. 



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I feel 


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within 


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a thousand ills. 


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And sore disease my life-blood chills. 


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pain 


my 


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9 

Is it Rum ? Is it Rum ? 


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1 


1 


R 


1 1 1 .-N 1 ^ » 


6s 5 


5 


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6 5- 5 


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' 4- 5 5 1- 1 



What is it makes my children sad? 

Is it rum ? Is it rum ? 
They are no longer laughing glp.d ; 

Is it rum? Is it rum? 
Now they have only rags to wear, 
And scanty is the bread they share. 
Oh, why so hard their lot and fare ? 

Is it ram? Is it rum? 

3 What is it makes their mother 
mourn ? 
Is it rum ? Is it rum ? 
Why is her heart with sorrow torn ? 

Is it rum ? Is it ram ? 
What makjgs her midnight vigils 
keep? 



Why, why does she so often 

weep, 
'Mid restless nights and broken 



Is it rum ? Is it rum ? 

4 Qh, what has cursed my happy 
home ? 

Is it rum ? Is it rum ? 
So far froni virtue made me roam ? 

Is it rum ? Is it rum ? 
If it be rum, enough for me, 
I from its thrall will quickly flee; 
I'll sign the pledge, and will be 
free ! 

Free from rum ! Free from rum ! 



NATIONAL TEMPKRAHCE SOXGSTEE. 35 

THE TEA PARTY. 

Air. — Wallace. Tune on page 234. 

1 Friends of sweet and social glee, 
Friends of true hilarity, 
Friends of peace and harmony, 

Join oar social band. 

2 Rude uproarious revelry 
Dire and drunken deviltry. 
Hence forever banish'd be 

From our native land. 

3 Sire and son together join, 
Peer and peasant intertwine, 
Prince and people now combine, 

A patriotic throng. 

4 Feast of reason, flow of soul, 
Supersede the madd'ning bowl, 
While instructive precepts roll 

From each gladdened tongue. 

5 Brandish'd arm and phrenzied eye, 
Loud and reckless blasphemy. 
Force no more the deep-fetched sigh 

From our faithful wives. 

6 Pure, refin'd domestic bliss, 
Social meetings such as t':is, 
Banish sorrow, cares dismiss, 

And cheer all our lives. 

7 The temp'rance flag is now unfurl'd; 
May it float around the world, 

Till the foe is headlong hurl'd 
From all mortal sight. 

8 Drive the demon ffom his stand. 
Spurn the foe from every land. 

Sink him — crush him — heart and hand, 
Down to endless night. 

SWEET HOME. 

Tune on page l'2l. 

1 From scenes of confusion, distraction, and strife, 
How sweet to return to the comforts of life, 
Discard dissipation, and find in its room 
The sweet conversation and pleasures of home. 



36 NATIONAL TEMPERANGE SONGSTER. 

2 No longer the victim of fraud and deceit, 
Nor common disturber of alley or street ; 
No longer deluded by bubbles and foam, 
But sweetly secluded in quiet at home. 

3 How cheering the welcome of partner or child. 
No more of their daily subsistence despoiled; 
Forgetting privations to others unknown, 

In Congratulations for present sweet home ! 

4 True temperance habits, with piety join'd, 
Bring health to the body and peace to the mind, 
For which to the tavern as vainly we roam, 

As into a tavern, for comforts of home. 

5 And may the enjoyments of temperance prove 
A foretaste of brighter and better above , 
Where through mediation the faithful shall come 
And, free from temptation, make heaven their home. 

MAINE LAW. 

AiK— Refrain. 



la $ 1-11 


1 .111 12 


1 




A 5 j 9 


! 1 


7 i .6. 


II 


4c 
Come all ye friends 
There's one Neal Dow, 

iG $ 


of Temperance, And listen 
a Portland man, With great 


to my strain, 
and noble soul, 




B 1 1 3- 3 5 


5 1 .1 3 3 1 5 6 


5 2 1 .3- 


Jl 



4o 



IG 2-222243 


2 1-1 


3 2 .1- 


A 6 1 » 1 


1 ' 


i [ 


4o 




REP. 1 & 2S. 


I'll t«ll you how old Alcho' fares 
Who framed a law withou^t a flaw, 


Down in the 
To banish 


State of Maine. 
Al - CO - hoi. 


la 




REP. 1 & 2s. 


B 3|5-555|565 


4 1 3- 4 


5 5 1 ,1-1 


4o ' 


9 





She leads the van of the Temperance clan, The noble State of Maine. 



lo 


1 1 12 


• 3 5 


5 


4 3 2 


1 


REP. 2s. 


A 


1 5 


1 ^ 




i 




•6- H 


40 

IG 


Hurrah for the State 


of Maine, 


The 


noble State 


of 


Maine. 

REP. TS 


B 


5(5355 


1 .6 3 


5 


16 5 4 


3 


•a. II 


4a 















NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 37 

2 This great Maine law, with its huge paw> 

Has laid the rummies low ; 
Their Brandy Kegs and Demijohns 

Do helter skelter go. 
It makes the critter bite the dust. 

And not the soals of men, 
And bids the vender of the stuff, 

Work for some noble end. 
Hurrah for the State of Maine, &c. 

3 The complicated License Laws, 

We've had so long in vogue, 
Are nothing more than play things for 

The lawyer and the rogue. 
They'd twist and turn them at their will, 

To suit their wicked plan, 
And leave unwhipped of justice all 

The scoundrels in the land. 
Hurrah for the State of Maine, &c. 

4 But this great law of which I sing. 

Has wonder working power ; 
Just get it in our statute books. 

The victory is ours. 
The lawyers, cannot quibble round 

Its language plain and clear ; 
'T will clear the track of the rummy pack; 

If we adopt it here. 

Hurrah for the State of Maine, &c. 

5 So, now good sons of Rechabite, 

And Washingtonians, too, 
Gird on the armor for the fight, 

And put the Maine law through ; 
And let all the Western daughters 

Of brave old Uncle Sam, 
Be next to back up sister Maine, 

In this new Temperance plan. 
Hurrah for the State of Maine, &c. 

drujstkard's appeal. 

\_From the Journal of the A. T. Union.'] 
Air — Home, Sweet Home. 
A way-worn inebriate an exile from home, 
O'er wretchedness brooding, asks, why do I roam 1 
My head silvered o'er, my sun nearly set , 
To reform I had thought there was time enough yet 

Time, time, — time enough yet — 
To reform I had thought there was time enough yet 



38 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCB SONGSTER. 



Surely never was bondage like that which I feel, 
With the demon, Strong Drink, my senses now reel, 
My brain is on fire, and no better I get ; 

! too long have I revelled on, time enough yet. 

Time, time, &c. 

Once honor and virtue were my chief delight, 
Kind friends sweetly smiled, and my pathway was bright ; 
But ah ! the sad custom to drink when we met 
Soon beggared my child, and the wife I love yet. 
Time, time, dec. 

The pledge oft presented, at last I did sign, 
Resolved on forsaking the maddening wine ; 
Vile comrades surrounded, temptations beset, 

1 drank — became drunken — and so I am yet. 

Time, time, &c. 

O ye who have power, put away the foul drink ! 
Washingtonians ! press onward, O! faint not, nor shrink; 
Fresh graves daily open, with widows" tears wet ! 
O say not, O think not; there 's time enough yet. 
Time, time, &c. 

Till every slain brother will rise and be free, 
And earth shall re-echo the blest jubilee ; 
When Alcohol's legions we 've every where met, 
Shall cease to oppose, crying time enough yet. 
Time, time, &c. 



AWAY THE BOWL. 



6(3 










REP. 




A 1 1 1 1 1 1 R 4 


3 R 


1 3 


R 




1 1- 


D 


2c 9 9 5 5 > 9 6 6 99 " 

9 9 9 9 


9 99 


99 9 


99 


7 

99 






Our youthful hearts with temperance burn, 
Erom dram shops all our steps -we turn, 


Away, 
Away, 


away 
away 




the 

the 


bowl, 
bowl. 




6o 














B 1 1 1 R 1 


R 




R 




I 1- 


15 


2o9 5555 644 99 6 


5 99 


5 5 


99 


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Away the bowl, away the bowl, Away, 



away 



99 

the bowL 



l^ATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



39 



60 


























EEP. 


Is. 


A 


1 




1 


2 


1 


1- 


2 


3 


1 




1 


2 


1 1 2 


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2o 9 7 

Farewell 

6q 


- 99 9 

to rum 


7 

and all 


9 9» 

its harm 


9 

5; 


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9 

Adieu the 


99 

wine 


9 

cup 


7 » 9 9 

9 

s boasted charms, 
REP. Is. 


B 










! 






1 


i 








1 


I II 



2c 5 



6 7 



2 See how that staggering drunkard 
reels, 

Away, away the bowl ; 
Alas ! the misery he reveals, 

Away, away the bowl. 
His children grieve, his wife in tears, 
How sad his once bright home 
appears ; 

Away the bowl, away the bowl, 

Away, away the bowl. 



3 We drink no more, nor buy nor 
sell; 

Away, away the bowl ; 
The drunkard's offers we repel, 

Away, away the bowl. 
United in a Temperance band, 
We're joined in heart, we're joined 
in hand ; 

Away the bowl, away the bowl, 

Away, away the bowl. 



THE TEETOTAL SHIP. 



iG /-N 11-11 



11-11 



2 2-22132 



99 9 9 9 99 



7 6 5 



A 3 5 



35 i '9 99 7 9" 



4c ' 9 

Our ship is afloat, on the broad flowing wave, 

And the proud pennant streams as a token to save ; 

la /-^ 



n " 1 1 
4c 9 9 



3 3-4511 

9 99 9 9 



/"" N 

3 3-4555 I 55-5446-5 | 5 5 3 1 



99 9 9 



99 9 9 9 99 



9 9 



la /-^ 



112333 422 5-11 3321 



A 3 5 



5 5 3 3 5 



Our captain is truth, and while manned by the free, 

What crew, and what men, are so happy as "we? 



B li|311111|33 4 5551677 55|655iy 

lO » » 9 9 9 9 r~9 r~9 9~9 99~99 Tl " 



40 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 To the end of the earth, then, our vessel shall go. 
With light at her keel, and good will at her prow ; 
Her foes shall retire, as they see how she flies, 
Like a bird when it spreadeth its wings to the skies. 

3 They told us that soon, when the battle came on, 
Her colors she'd strike, and her courage be gone ; 
They knew not how proudly the war flag she'd rear, 
Nor a bosom on board her indulge in a fear. 

4 They talked of their grape shot, so direful and dread, 
They would raite fore and aft with hot shot, so they said; 
But the old pirate hulk made her boasting in vain, 

We fought them before, and we'll fight them again. 

5 Though the tempest roars loud as she floats on her way, 
She breasts the dread billows, though fiercely they play; 
And proudly she rides o'er the wild foaming wave, 

To scare the destroyer, the hopeless to save. 

6 Come, board her to-night, there is plenty of room, 
Lo ! the pledge-book is hoisted, a light at her boom ; 
The breezes of heaven, how softly they play, 

And the cheers of the brave speed our ship on her way. 



THE DRUNKARD'S WIFE. 

Air — " The Soldier's Tear." 
4g /-> /^ 



A 1|3-2 3«4|5r3|2-1S43|2r 1|S"2 3-4| 



2c~~9 ^ rTl V> r~> 9 9? 9 >9 9> 9 5 99 9 99 9 W 

99 

Before the altar stood The bridegroom and the bride, With willing hands and 
4g /^n 



1 I 1- 1" I 1 R 1 I /-N I R 1 1 I 1- 1« 2 ( 

2c 9 9597 '9 5-5565 5 ' 99 " ' 5 9 99 

99 99 9 99 9 99 99 99 



4g /^ 




-^ /--N 


A 6 5 5 4 3 


I 2 5- ?- 6 1 5 li R 5 1 5-444 


1 4 3 3 3 1 


2c ' > 9 99 99 

blended hearts, 
4o /-^N 


99 > > 99 » > > 99 9 9 

The holy knot was tied ; And when he spoke 


9 99 99 
the words So 


B 4 3 2 11 


1 1 II R 1 1 1- 2 2 2 


1 1 1 1 f 


2o » » 1 ty ii 


5 5-5-4 3 9 9 » »» 9 9 


7 99 99 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 4*i 



lid /"^ -9 1 /^ 




A 3-2 6-5 j 5 R .-^ 1 1-2 3-4 | 5 7 6 5' | 3533-2 


IMI 


2c » " ' " > 55 9 99 9 99 9 >9 99 > 9 99 » 9 99 
9> >» 

welcome and so dear, There glistened in her mild blue eye, 

That test of love- 


> 


-a tear. 


4o /"^ /-^ p p /^^ 




B 1 Rll|l- 1-2134 s4 551121 5- 


IR II 


2C 6- 5 4- 3 5 ' " '? 9 5 9 99 > 99 99 9 9 » 99 »9 9 7 


9 



2 And thus they lived and loved-— 

Their hours were never dull ; 
And heav'n had crowned their union sweet, 

With pledges beautiful; 
And as her charge increased, 

With each succeeding year, 
The mother's heart rushed to her eye, 

Which trembled with a tear. 



3 But year has followed year — 

As wave succeeding wave ; 
The once loved wife is joyless now, 

And he a drunken slave. 
Vice o'er him holds her sway, 

And from his dark career 
She tries to win him, and her eye — 

Her dimmed eye — drops a tear. 

4 Her kindness pleads in vain — 

His heart is seared and hard; 
And tauntings loud, and cruel blows, 

Are that fond wife's reward. 
He spurns her from his side, 

With looks and words severe. 
Yet for that rufSan's sake her eye, 

Is gushing with a tear. 

5 That wife 's a widow now ; 

The star of hope shall rise 
No more for her — her bosom lord 

Died as the drunkard dies ! 
Grod help this bruised reed. 

Her load of woe to bear; 
For none but thou canst calm her soul, 

Who cannot shed a tear. 



42 J^ATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

CONSTITUTION. 

Air — " Rosiii the Bow/' 



4g $ 


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" The Maine law is unconstitutional, We are 
And this is the great moral argument, 
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not ready for the law yet : " 

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We'll teach them what is constitutional, 

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selling, rum-loving 


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set. Now, if this 


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is all that they know, 
\^e'll teach them a thing 
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or so. 
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When we next to the ballot box go. 

2"Yoq'11 takeaway all of our liberty, I What they please, but we shall 
And create a new party also ; " | gain the day : 

No.sirs,bLit we'll banish yourmisery, And teach them what is constitu- 
Together with whisky and woe. tional, 

The hunkers and fogies may say | When we next to the ballotbox go. 

THE LITTLE BOY THAT DIED. l. 



A 5- 4 i 3 1 1 2 2 I 1 I 1112 3 i .4 



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I'm all alone in my chamber now. And the midnight hour is near, 



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IfATIONAL TEMPJSRANCE SONGSTER. 43 

|62 

( A 5-4|311g2| l II I 1 1 4 a I .1 g 

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I And the faggot's crack, and the clock's dull tick, Are the only sounds I hear 

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over my soul 


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its 


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feelings 


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my heart and eyes are full when I think Of the little hoy that died. 

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44 NATIONAL TEMPERANOE SONGSTER. 

2 I went one night to my father's house, 

Went home to the dear ones all, 
And softly I opened the garden gate, 
And softly the door of the hall; 
My mother came out to meet her son — 
She kissed me, and then she sighed, 
And her head fell on my neck, and she wept 
For the little boy that died. 



I shall miss him when the flowers come, 
In the garden where he played ; 
I shall miss him more by the fireside, 

When the flowers have all decayed. 
I shall see his toys, and his empty chair, 
And the horse he used to ride ; 
And they will speak, with a silent speech. 
Of the little boy that died. 



I shall see his little sister again, 
With her playmates about the door. 
And I'll watch the children in their sports, 
As I never did before ; 
And if, in the group, I see a child 
That's dimpled and laughing-eyed, 
I'll look to see if it may not be 
The little boy that died. 



We shall all go home to our Father's house- 
To our Father's house in the skies. 
Where the hope of our souls shall have no blight. 
Our love no broken ties ; 
We shall roam on the banks of the river of peace, 
And bathe in its blissful tide ; 
And one of the joys of our heaven shall be 
The little boy that died. 



There's peace, and joy, and truth, and bliss, 
In that blest land above ; 
Where pleasures never fade away. 
And all is light and love. 
And there we'll meet our loved and lost. 
With all the glorified; 
And there we'll fold to our heart again^ 
The little boy that died. 



A HUNDRED YEARS AGO. l. 45 

6a 



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Where, whero are all the birds that sang, A hundred years ago, The flowers that all 
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in beauty sprang, A hundred years ago? The lips that smiled, the eyes that wild, 
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46 NATIONAL TEMPEKAMCE SONGSTEK. 



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2 Who peopled all the city street, 

A hundred years ago ? 
Who filled the church with faces meek, 

A hundred years ago ? 
The sneering tale of sister frail, 
The plot that worked a brother's hurt; 
Where, O where are the plots and sneers, 
The poor man's hopes, the rich man's fears, 

That lived so long ago? 

3 Where are the graves where dead men slept, 

A hundred years ago? 
Who were they whom the living wept, 

A hundred years ago 1 
By other men, that knew not them. 
Their lands are tilled, their graves are filled; 
And nature then was just as gay, 
And bright the sun shone as to-day, 

A hundred years ago. 



WHERE IS MY HOME? 47 

Sp 



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Shall live, when time has ceased to run. There is my home, There is my home. 
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2 Where peace and love the air perfume, 
Where an eternal summer's bloom, 
And joy, and gladness, banish gloom — 

There is my home. 

3 Where streams of crystal onward flow, 
Where streets of gold in splendor glow, 
And fadeless flowers in beauty grow- 
There is my home. 

4 Where lips shall never breathe farewell. 
Nor tears the parting anguish tell, 
Where friends united ever dwell — 

There is my home. 

6 Where, seated on th' eternal throne, 
H<5 shall his faithful followers own, 
With gracious smile ; in heaven alone— 
Thierte is my hbrae ! 



48 RUB OR RUST. 



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the sky, 


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"Die when die thou 


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2 In the grave there's sleep enough — 

" Better rub than rust ; 
Death, perhaps, is hunger-proof, 

Die V7hen die thou must ; 
Men are mowing, breezes blowing, 

Better rub than rust." 



3 He who will not work, shall want; 
Naught for naught is just — 
Wont do, must do when he canH, 

" Better rub than rust. 
Bees qre flying, sloth is dying, -. 
Better rub than rust." 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 49 

OLD UNCLE BILL. l, 

iSo__ z;^ /^ P REP. Is- 

A 3|5- » 5533 | 5432 U\\ 3 | 4 4^655-3 | .2- |i 3 3 | 



? > ? » > 99 



There was a drunkard, they called him Uncle Bill, He lived long ago, long ago, 
His cottage stood at the foot of the hill, Where the 

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pure sparkling waters flow, 
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9 9 9 9 

He laid down the bottle and the bowl. He drank to 
the ruin of his 





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2 His eyes grew dim, and his hair it was gray, 

His limbs they were palsied too, 
He felt his health and strength decay, 
As near to the grave he drew. 

He laid down, &;c. 

3 At length stern death, with his cold and icy hand» 

Advanced to his lowly bed, 
And snapped life's cord with stern command, 
And the poor drunkard's spirit fled. 

He laid down. &;c. 

4 Come all ye tipplers take warning by his lot, 

From the grog shops and taverns flee, 

For if you don't wish to die a drunken sot, 

You must leave the cursed liquor be. 

He laid down, &c. 
4 



60 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE S0NC4STER. 

Then lay down tLe bottle and the bowl, 
And drink not the chalice of your soul, 

Or else like poor old Uncle Bill, 

You'll go where the poor drunkards go. 

He laid down, &;c. 



THE TEMPERANCE FLAG. 



iG 



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2c 9 ' 9' ' ' 9 ?9 9 9 9 9999 999 9999999 9 99 9 9^ 
The temperance flag ! the temperance flag ! 

It is the banner of the free ! The temperance flag, the temperance flag ! An 

iG ^ REP. 2s. 

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99 9 99 9 9 99 > 9 9 9 99 9 99 9 9 

That flag invites ail men to come, And 

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A3 2 135|lll|)l|32135illll|32135|222|j 

2o 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 ? 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 > 99 99 9 r~9 9 9 9~" 

emblem of our liberty. That flag proclaims us free from RUM. A foe we never will 

obey ; 

iG EEP. 2s. 



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2c 67953 559 9 6 5 665 9559 65669 77 7 

9 99 99 99 99 99 999 99 99 99 99 999 

join the cause without delay. 

That banner tells of sorrows past, 

Of hope, that now prevails instead ; 
Of grief, when Rum did bind men fast; 

Of joy, now that their foe is fled. 

No more that tyrant shall have sway, 

And ruin those who serve him best^ 
Alluring men, 'till they obey 

Each Herce command, each stern behest. 

It tells of comforts to the poor, 

Of peace and safety to the rich; 
It brings contentment to the door 

Where bitter strife and anguish dwelt. 

Forever be that Flag displayed, 

Throuirh all our country far and wide ; 

Ne'er Washingtonians, be dismayed, 
But still uphold it side by side. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 51 

ARABY'S DAUGHTER. 

Air — Arahy's Daughter, 



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Oh, -when I remember the sorrow and sadness, That reigned in the hut that was 

not e'en our 
When night had no solacOjand day had no gladu©gs,For husband, and father,and 

friend we had 

6a Ist. 



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A husband reclaimed, and a father all tender. And friends smiling here in this 

home of our 

6a 2nd rep. Is. 



A 1 II i I 1 I 3-211 



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own; 9999 99 99 999 99999 9 9 

Those dark clouds of woe are to this scene of splendor, As midnight's meridian to 
none. day's brightest noon. 



own ; 
23o 2nd. 




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230 '9 9 9 9 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 99 9 

Solo.— The Wife. 

1 Oh, when I remember the sorrow and sadness 

Which reigned in the hut that was not e'en our own — 
When night had no solace, and day brought no gladness, 

For husband, and father, and friends we had none — 
Those dark clouds of woe are to this scene of splendor, 

As midnight's meridian to day's brightest noon — 
A husband reclaimed, and a father all tender, 

And friends smiling here in this home of our own. 

Duett. — Daughters. 

2 Oh, sad is the story that mem'ry yet telling ! 

It weighs on the heart, it still rings in the ear, 
Like the chill blast that howled round our desolate dwelling! 

Cold hunger within, when no succors were near ! 
Our mother — at midnight — her heart almost broken — 

How often she hushed on her bosom our sighs ! 
Well — well may she cherish that pledge — dearest token! 

A father reformed wipes all tears from our eyes. 



h^ NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

Trio. — Sojis. 

3 Yes, we who now eagerly ran for his blessing, 

Or nightly, in rapture, recline on his knee ; 
Familiar with blows, in place of caresses, 

Away from our father, how oft we did flee ! 
' T was drink — ' t was the drink — else how could that fond father 

Have treated unkindly his children and wife ? 
B.St forgot be the past, and now dwell we much rather 

T)n the present, the happiest time of our life. 

Solo. — Husband. 

4 Yes, yes, ' t was the drink that my mind had been stealing, 

Intemperance had seared all my heart-fibres o'er; 
And conscience to smother — to hush all appealing — 

I drank till I raved and abused you all sore. 
But thanks be to Him who hath never forsaken! 

And thanks to His agents who ne'er gave me o'er 

{Husband, Wife, Daughters, and Sons^) 

The teetotal Pledge, that we all have now takeii. 

We'U keep, Washingtonians, till life is no more. 

THE TEMPERANCE BANNER. 



IG. $ 11 1- 


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Long may the temperance banner wave, Triumphant o'er the land, 

And may it many a drunkard save, To join our happy band. Un 



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fai:<»d forever let it be, A guide to bring the drunkard's in, That they may all 
their errors see, And now for temperance begin, 

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2 When on that banner we do gaze, 

Showing its beauties fair and bright — 
While over us it proudly waves, 
Remember we for freedom fight 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTEB. 53 

Then never let us yield to rum, 

For now the flag of temp'rance waves, 
But with renewed vigor come, 

And peace shall crown our future days. 

3 And we shall find that every year 

Will tell of victories most sublime — 
That temperance her flag shall rear 

Over the earth's remotest clime. 
The temp'rance banner of the brave 

We now will ever hold most dear — 
Its radiant folds shall proudly wave 

Till closes time's expiring year. 

THE DRUNKARD'S GRAVE, l. 

iG. 

A |3 3433|lglg|3354|222 |3343|12 1>g2r 

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I saw a youth in his father's hall, Whose joy-lit eye and aspect gay, ShoAved a 
heart yet free from passion's thrall, Ligh ^ 
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; Generous, virtuous, fair and brave, Yet he fills a 
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2 I saw by the midnight taper's gleam, 

A tireless student, pensive, pore 
O'er history's page, or some noble theme, 

That poets have sung in classic lore. 

Yet the green willow doth o'er him wave, 
Alas! he sleeps in the druiikaTd's grave. 

3 I saw an old man, whose locks were gray, 

Silver'd b}^ care and the length of years; 
Unmoved by these signs of speedy decay, 

And by his children's frequent tears. 
Ah! they may we6p, but cannot save 
That erring man from a drunkard's ffrav 



64 KATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



4 The young, the old, and tke brave are there. 
The proud and the humble together sleep; 
The father, caught by intemperance' snare ; 
And his son, who once could o'er him weep. 
The rich, the poor, the free, the slave, 
Go alike to tlie druiikard's grave. 



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1 was tossed by the winds on a treacherous wave, 

Above me was peril, beneath me a grave ; 
5P\ie sky to my earnest inquiry was dark ; 

The storm, in a deluge, came down on my bark ! 

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How fearful to drive on a horrible shore. 

Where the breakers of ruin 
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eternally roar. 


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2 O mercy! to wreck in the morning of days, — 

To die when life dazzles with changeable rays,*^ 
To sink as the grovelling and vile of the ship, 
The rose on my cheek and the dew on my lip, 
And fling as a bauble, my soul to the heaps, 
That glisten and mock from the caves of the deep, 

3 O no! for a star trembles out in the sky, 
The shrieks of the ocean complainingly die. 
The gales that I covet blow fresh from the shore, 
Where the breakers of ruin eternally roar ; 
Every sail presses homeward — all praises to Thee, 
Whose word in that hour hiished tempest and sea. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTEE. 65 

SOME LOVE TO ROAM. l. 

QCr 1 1 REP. Is. 



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Some love to roam Where the glasses foam. And the poison circles free ; 
Eut a chosen land, In a rescued laud, 
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To hallow our life, With a glorious strife. 



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And 


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And to crush our country's foe 

2 The snake we mark 

In the bar-room dark, 
And untempted turn our back ; 

And for right good cheer, 

At our homes so dear, 
Oh, why should the temperate lack? 



For with steady aim, 

At an honored name, 
And hearts that fear no foe, 

Our brother to save, 

From the drunkard's grave, 
In the spirit of io\e we go. 



THE OLD SEXTON.— iV(?. 1. l. 



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''Mine is the fame most blaaoned of all. 


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sceptre so feared as the spade ; 


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56 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

50 1 



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This is the lav 
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While the mournful knell of the tolling bell, Chimes in with his burden of glee. 

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2 He dons a doublet of sober brown, 

And a hat of slouching felt ; 
The mattock is over his shoulder thrown, 

And heavy keys clank at his belt. 
The dark damp vault now echoes his tread, 

While bis song rings merrily out ; 
With a cob-web canopy over his head. 

And coffins falling about. 



3 His foot maj?^ crush the full-fed worms, 

His hand may grasp a shroud, 
His gaze may rest on skeleton forms, 

Yet his tones are light and loud. 
He digs the grave, and his chant will break 

As he gains a fathom deep — 
"Whoever lies in the bed 1 make, 

I warrant will soundly sleep." 



4 He piles the sod, he raises the stone, 

He clips the cypress tree ; 
But, whate'er his task, 'tis plied alone. 

No fellowship holds he ; 
For the Sexton grey is a scaring loon, 

His name is linked with death: 
The children at play, should he cross tlieir way, 

Will panes with fluttering breath. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 5T 

5 They herd together, a frightened host, 

And whisper with lips all white — 
See ! See ! 'tis he, who sends the ghost, 

To walk the world at night. 
The old men mark him, with fear in their eye. 

At his labor 'mid skulls and dust ; 
They hear him chant, " The young may die. 

But we know the aged must,'* 



6 The rich will frown, as his ditty goes on— 

" Though broad your lands may be, 
Six narrow feet to the beggar 1 mete. 

And the same shall serve for ye." 
The ear of the strong will turn from his song, 

And beauty's cheek will pale ; 
" Out! Out!" cry they, " What mortal would stay, 

To list thy croaking tale ?" 



7 Oh ! the Sexton gray is a mortal of dread ; 

None like to see him come near; 
The orphan thinks on a father dead, 

The widow wipes a tear. 
By night or by day, this, this is his lay: 

" Mine is the goodliest trade ; 
Never was banner so wide as the pall, 

Nor sceptre so feared as the spade." 



THE OLD SEXTON.— iVa 2. l. 
Words by P. K. Killbourne. 



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58 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



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With his mattock and spade the Sexton sate, And his 
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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTEE. 59 



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2 How he summoned the ghosts from their graves at night, 
And danced with them 'neath the pale moonlight: 

And of fearful lights that were seen to glide 

Around the grave of the murdered bride : 

And ominous sounds, on the ear that fell, 

Like the wail of spirits released from hell; 

And amid those shrieks that the brave heart stirred, 

Was the voice of that hoary Sexton heard. 

3 I remember a youth full of fancy and song, 
And I noted him oft, as he passed along : 

For he shrank away from the haughty and proud, 
And his heart seemed sad 'mid the jovial crowd. 
He had sought for fame, there was none for him, 
And his che^ek grew pale and his eye grew dim : 
His disease crept on, and his peace was o'er, 
And I'll warrant he'll sorrow and sigh no more. 

*4 I saw a fair lady go rustling by, 

With a curling lip and a scorniul eye ; 

And deep in her heart she silently said, 

" 1 fear thee not, thou man of the dead." 

But they brought her to me all despoiled of her bloom, 

And I laid her down in the damps of the tomb ; 

And the greedy worms are rioting now, 

On her withered form and her faded brow. 

5 A titled 'squire dwelt over the way, 

And loudly he talked of his wealth and renown; 
And he rolled in his gay calash by day, 

And he rested at night on his bed of down. 
But they stripped him of all his costly array, 

In his death-cap and shroud they arrayed him^; 
And he rfever slept so sound before, 

As he sleeps in the bed where I laid him. 



50 NATJ^^JN'AL TEMPERANCE SONGSTKK. 

6 I have seen a dull knave rich in glory and gold, 
And have seen the pure-hearted go hungry ftnd cold: 
And the proud and the poor, and the guilty and gay, 
I have gathered them all to their dwellings of clay. 
I have herded with mourners for threescore years, 
And I hear not their wailings, I heed not their tears. 
"While they sigh and look doleful, I laugh in my glee, 
For the sound on their coffins is music to me. 



7 Ha ! little care they to know, I ween, 
Of the gay and ghastly sights I've seen ; 
Or the sounds of mirth, or the shrieks of woe, 
That ring through the vaulted halls below! 
When the skies are dark, and the storms are loud. 
The dead leave their coffin-beds each in his shroud ; 
And 1 know their limbs are nimble and fleet, 
For I heard the clank of their skeleton feet. 



8 As they tripped it light o'er the marble floor. 
Their music rang 'mid the tempest's roar; 
And I listened long to their echoing tread. 
And my spade kept time to the dance of the dead. 
Then the clatter of bony hands I heard, 
As they clasped each other with never a word : 
Strange music was there, but their voices were still, 
As they lightly wheeled in their dread quadrille. 



THE OLD SEXTOS.— No. 3. l. 
Words by Park Benjamin. 

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A 666634|5 5 3221| 1 2 3 3 1 } 

Nigh to a grave that was newly made, Leaned a Sexton old, on his 

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62 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 

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1 " I gather them iu for man and boy, 
Year after year of grief and joy; 
I have builded the houses that lie around, 
In every nook of this burial ground. 
Mother and daughter, father and sou, 
Come to my solitude one by one, 
Or come they strangers, or come they kin, 
I gather them in, I gather them in." 



"Many are with me, but still I'm alone: 

I'm king of the dead, and I make my throne, 

On a monument slab of marble cold, 

And my sceptre of rule is the spade I hold. 

Come they from cottage, or come they from haU. 

Mankind are my subjects, all, all, all ; 

Let them loiter in pleasure or toilfully spin, 

I gather them in, I gather them in." 



" I gather them in, and their final rest, 
Is low^ down in this Church-yard's breast." 
The Sexton ceased, and the funeral train, 
"Wound mutely o'er that silent plain. 
And I said to my heart, when time is told, 
A mightier voice than that Sexton's old, 
W'iil sound o'er the last trump's dreadful din 
I gather them in, I gather them in, 



THE SAINT'S DESIRE, lis. 



63 



COMPOSED BY L. D. MARTIN. 

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— ARRANGED BY G. 


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1 Oh ! had I the wings of a dove I would fly. 

Away to my home, and for ever reside 
With angels and purified spirits on high, 

Who fast by the throne of my Saviour abide ; 
The days of my sorrowing then should be past, 

My warfare and pilgrimage both should be o'er 
Safe, safe in the climes of bright glory at last, 

Where sin and where suffering are heard of no more. 

2 Oh ! there I should range, with the saints in pure white;, 

The banks of the river that flows from the throne : 
Bnt ever return from each feebler delight. 

To feast on the smile of my Saviour alone: 
If here, in the gloom of this dungeon below. 

The light of that smile pierce the gross walls of clay 
What triumphs of rapture incessantly flow 

From that blessed smile in the regions of day ! 

3 The fields of that land may for ever be green, 

Its flowers ne'er wither, nor fruitage decay, 
And autumn and spring hand in hand may be seen. 

Like beauty and wealth in their bridal array: 
Each sight may be charming, ecstatic each sound, 

Each odor be fragrant as gales of the spring ; 
But all beauties mingle, and all joys are found 

Alone in the smile of my Saviour and King. 

4 With patriarchs, prophets, and sages of old, 

Who walked with their God in this valley of tears — 
With saints and with martyrs in life's book enrolled, 
Methinks I might joyfully spend the long years: 



64 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

With angels how happily could I unite — 

They watched o'er my pathway with dangers bestrown; 
But still I would turn, with increasing delight, 

To feast on the smile of my Saviour alone. 



TRUEMAN. C. M. A. Lane. 

i2g r^ .11 



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.1 


1^2 3 ,4 2 .1 


A 1 


1 6 1 .4 s4 1 


.5151 » 1 1 Ij 



If, when deceiyed and wounded here, We could not fly to thee. 
2a /^N 



B 5 { .5 3 I .1.4 I .2 s2 I .3 || 1 | 3- 2 1 | .4 5 | ,1 ( j 



8o , ' 

2 The friends, who in our sunshine live. 

When winter comes are flown ; 
And he who has but tears to give, 
Must weep those tears alone. 

3 But thou wilt heal the broken heart, 

Which, like the plants that throw 
Their fragrance from the wounded part, 
Breathes sweetness out of woe. 

4 When joy no longer soothes or cheers. 

And e'en the hope that threw 
J A moment's sparkle o'er our tears, 

Is dimmed and vanished too : 

5 O who could bear life's stormy doom. 

Did not thy wing of love 
Come brightly wafting, through the gloom, 
Our peace branch from above! 

6 Then sorrow, touched by thee, grows bright. 

With more than rapture's ray ; 
As darkness shows us worlds of light 
We never saw by day. 



THE DEEP BLUE SEA. l. 6b 

2-____l 

~ 7 > 6 I 5- 3 4 6 |_a-_H 
» » > > > 

The deep blue sea ! how fair it seems, When gleaming in the morning beams, 

2g 1-12 1 11 1- 

D 5 5 7 I > * ' \ 7- 5 * ' \ 6 7 6 I 5- H 

On. > > » » » > ' 



2a 


1-1 1 


A 1 3_6_| 
3n > > > 


' 7 ' 

9 



1 1 2 I 3- 1 I 1 1 



3c » » » '55 5- 5 » » 5-344 5 - 



2a 


1- 1 


1 


2- 1 




p. 


A 13 5 


1 


7 ' 


1 7 ' 6 1 


5 s4 


1 5- II 


3c » > » 




> 


> 9 






And silver clouds like 


sunny 


dreams. Roll o'er its 


placid 


breast. 


2g 


1- 1 


2 1 


1 1 


.1 


1- 


B 5 5 7 


1 


t 9 


1 7- 5 » ' 1 


7 


! 


So > > > 






» 






2o 










p. 


B 112 


1 3- 1 




1 111 


.1 2 


1 1- 1! 


3c > » > 


> 


5 5 


5- 5 » » 







2a 12 3-1 12- 



A 


5 


9 


' 1 


9 


7 


9 




7 


' 6 


1 5- 


3 


4 


6 


2- 


II 


3c 
The br 

2g 


eeze 


sighs 


softly 
1- 1 


9 

o'er 
2 


the 
1 


wave. 


9 

As 


silent 
1 1 


» > > 

as the banks they lave. 




D 


5 


5 

9 


7 1 


9 


9 


9 


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> > 


1 


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8c 

2a 


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' 










» 






9 


> 


' 







B 1 1 3 I 5- 1 ! 1 1 I 1- ^ _j II 

3c * y > 9 5 5 5- 5 > > 3 4 4 5- !l 

9 9 9 > > > 



2a 




1-1 1 




2- 1 


1- 


A 13 5 


i 


» 7 » 


1 


7 » 6 


1 .5 7 1 II 


So > > » 

For every 
2g 


wind 


sleeps In 
1-12 1 


its 


9 9 

cave, Each 
1 1 


billow is at rest 
.1 


D 5 5 7 


1 


> > > 


i 


7- 5 » ' 


1 5 1 3- B 


3c » » » » 

2a 


B 112 


1 


3- 1 


1 


1 1 


1 1 1' i 


go » » > 




* 5 5 




5- 5 » ' 


.5 5 



66 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 



2 The dark blue sea ! how pure and bright, 
When resting in the hush of night. 
Bathed in the radiance of moonlight, 

So fair and yet so cold. 
The twinkling stars far downward peep, 
Reflected in the tranquil deep, 
Whose bosom glov/s in quiet sleep, 

Like mantle decked with gold. 

3 The proud blue sea! when winds are high, 
And darkness gathers in the sky, 

And the frail bark unconsciously, 

Is swiftly onward borne ; 
Then like a lion roused, at length 
He shakes his mane in pride of strength, 
And his wild roar, from shore to shore, 

Resounds, as if in scorn. 

4 The wild blue sea! how fearful now, 
To gaze upon its furious brow, 

And list the dreary waves that plough, 

Its billows mountain-high ! 
Now death and danger seem to ride. 
Presiding o'er the foaming tide ; 
And ocean drowns, with voice of pride. 

The seaman's strangling cry. 

5 The calm blue sea! how still the wave, 

Soft breathes the wind through rock and cave, 
A dirge o'er many a victim's grave, 

Far 'mongst the waters free I 
Oh! how sublime must be the power. 
Of HIM who bids the tempest lower. 
Yet sways thee, in thy wildest hour, 

Thou glorious dark blue sea. 



4o 


.1 




c 


xJl 




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J. 


L. 








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6 


1 5 .1 


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4s 
4g 


Among 


the mountain 


trees, The 


winds 


were 


> 
whispering 


low, 




C 

4s' 

4a 


.6 


1 3 3 


6 


4 


1 3 


1 


3- 


2 1 




1 .1 


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1 1 


2 


1 


.6 
.1- 


6 




9 


7 








1 






1 


5 ! 


5- 


6 5 


5 


.3 


1! 


48 

4q 
















> 








B 


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1 1 




1 


1 ^ 


1 


1- 


1 


2 




H 


143 






7 




B .4 


5 




7 




.6 





NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



67 



4a 


.1 
















A 




i 5 


5 7 


& i 


5 


s4 5 1 1 5-4 3 


2 
of 


1 .1 B 


4s 
4o 


And 


night's 


ten thousand 


harmonies, "Were harmonies 


woe ; 


C 


.6 


1 3 


3 5 


4 1 


3 


SB 3 1 3- » 1 




1 .1 II 


4s 

4g 


.1 


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1 


1 


6 * 


7 




D 




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1 




6 5 5 i 5-6 5 


5 


1 .3 II 


4s » 
4a 


B 

4s 


.1 


1 1 


1 


1 1 




1 1- 1 


S 


1 !I 






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5 S4 5 5 7 




.5 



4g 

A"" 






















1 










.1 


1 3 


3 


S 


2 


1 4 4 


3 


4 


5 




5- 


4 1 3 


2 .1 II 


4s 
4g 


A 


voice 


of gr 


ief 


was 


on 


the gale, 


It 


came 


p. ' 
from Kedron's gloomy vale. 
P. 







.1 


1 1 


1 






I 2 2 


1 


2 1 


3 


6 


3- 


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.1 II 


4s 

4a 










7 


7 








1 


1 


1- 


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7 


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6 1 5 


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4a 






















p. 
p. 




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6 4 


4 


6 


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7 



2 It was the Saviour's prayer 
That on the silence broke, [bear 

Imploring- heaven for strength to 

The sin-avenging- stroke ; 
As in Gethsemane he knelt, 
And pangs unknown his bosom felt. 

3 The fitful starlight shone 
In dim and misty gleams ; 

Deep was his agonizing groan, 
And large the vital streams 
That trickled to the dewy sod, 
While Jesus raised his voice to God. 

4 The chosen three that staid, 
Their nightly watch to keep, [wade. 

Left him through sorrows deep to 
And gave themselves to sleep : 



Meekly and sad he prayed alone, 
Strangely forgotten by his own. 

5 Along the streamlet's banks 
The reckless traitor came, 

And heavy on his bosom sank. 
The load of guilt and shame : 
Yet unto them that waited nigh 
He gave the Lamb of God to 
die. 

6 Among the mountain trees 

The winds were whispering lov/, 
And night's ten thousand harmonies 

Were harmonies of woe: 
For cruel voices filled the gale 
That came from Kedron's gloomy 
vale. 



68 THE OLD CHURCH BELL.— A'b. i. l. 

1p§ 1 REP. Is 



65333|653||3|63 7|6-0 



23s "" > » » > 9 > > 

The old Church Bell with its voice so strong, Is chiming loud and clear ; 
That same old tune, and that same old song, 

1p§ rep. Is. 

3-i32111i3gl||l|3355|3-"i 



Ip 


1- 


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1 








A 


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6 


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1 6 


3 




7 


\ 6. 


II 


23s 

That same 
Ip 


f 9* 99 

old tune and that 


> 
same old 


song 


Which in 


9 9 

youth I loved to hear, 




C 


6- 1 


5 


5 


5 


3 


3 


1 3 


3 


3 


11 1 


1 


1 3 


3 


5 


5 


3- 


II 


23s 






9 




>> 


»> 




9 




>> 


>> 




9 




9 







lP.§ 1- 


3 12 3 2 1 1 


3 12 3 REP. 5s. 


A 1 


7 , , , j , ^ ,, , 1 


7 » ' ' I ^- 11 


23s 
Oh! then was I a light-hearted hoy. My 
And that old bell, how I leaped with joy, 

lp§ 1 


9 

soul was full of glee, 

/^^ 1 REP. 5s. 


C 6- 1 


6556' I555II6 


6 5 5 6 ' i 5- II 


23s 

Ip 3- 


> » » 9 9 
1 


9 9 9 
1 


A 1 


7 ' 6 7 7 1 s5 6 3 II 3 


1 6 3 7 1 6- II 


23s 

And that 
Ip 1- 


» » 9 9 

old hell, how I leaped with joy, 


9 9 

It rang so merrily. 


c 1 


554221333 ill 


1 3 3 5 5 1 3- ff 


23a 


> » f» > f 


9 9 



2 Those days are gone, and my youth has fled, 

And they, my playmates then, 
Are wandering far, or rest with the dead, [Repeat,] 

Never to meet again. 
Prom youth to age, and from age to the grave, 

Old time still steals along. 
And that old bell, with its voice so brave, [Repeat.] 

Both merrily ring r- 



r on. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. GO 

3 *' The seasons come, the seasons go, 

And with them many a sigh ; 
The old bell peals a note of woe, [Repeat.] 

For loved ones when they die. 
And soon, full soon, the winding sheet, 

May wrap my senseless clay, 
And that old bell with cadence sweet, [Repeat.} 

May toll a solemn lay." L, 



THE OLD CHURCH BELL.— iVo. 2. 



4(} 




1 /-^ 






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A 


.3 1 


56531 76533 


1 4 4 


4 


3 4 


I .5 


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4c 

For 
4g 


full 


five hundred years I'ye swung, In 


my ancient 


tower 


high ; 




(; 


.1 


3331|44311| 


3 2 


2 


1 S 


1 .3 


II 


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> > 
111 1 






> 9 






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.5 1 


5 1 6 5 5 5 1 


6 6 


6 


7 6 


1 .5 


11 


4c > » * * 

4a 


B 


.1 


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i .1 


11 


40 




> 9 


6 6 


6 5 







4o 








1 /^ 


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A 


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5 


5 5 5 4 3 1 


7 6 5 6 


1 5 5 4 3 3 2 


.1 II 


4c 

Of 
4q 


many 


9 

a 


9 9 9 

different theme 


9 9 

I've sung, As 


> > > » 

time went stealing 


by. 


G 


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3 


3 3 3 2 1 


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12 2 112 1 


.3 II 


4c 
4g 
D 


"75"! 


> 
1 

9 


9 > > 
111 

' 7 6 


1 1 






1 6 6 


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.6 11 


4c » > » » 

4g 


B 


.1 1 


1 


1112 1 


1 1 2 S 1 


1 


.1 II 


4o 




> 


9 9 9 




5 5 4 5 





70 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

4g 11 r\ 111 



A .5 1 777166 s5 6 


5 1 


' ' F 7 7 1 .6 J 


4c > > > > 

I've pealed the chant on a wedding morn, 
4g 


Ere night I have sadly tolled, 


G .3|55555|444 


3 1 


5 5 5 5 5 1 .3 il 


4c » ' ' » 
4g 111 


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4o » » ' > 

4g 



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^c ' ' ' ' 



4q 11 


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A .5 1 77166 s5 6615543 


3 2 1 


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To say " the bride is coming love-lorn. To sleep in the Chnrch-yard mould." 
4g /^ 


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4a 


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1 


.l-R I! 


4o > > 7 5 5 5 


6 5 





4g 



.5 3- 2 I 1 1 .1 I 5 g 3 4 3 I 1 1- .1 I 



4c 



Ding, dong, my ceaseless song, Merry or sad, hut never long, 



4q 


MODERATE 


SOFT. VERT SOFT. 






A 


.5 .3 i .1 


.1 1 1 


.1- 


J 


40 


5 5 

Ding dong, ding dong hell. 


7 7 .5 .5 

Ding dong hell; Ding, dong, 


heU. 





NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 71 

'd For fall five hundred years I've swung, 

In my old grey turret high, 
And many a different song I've sung, ' 

As time went gliding by. 
I've swelled the joy of my country's pride, 

For a victory far off won, 
Then changed to grief for the brave who died. 

Ere my mirth had well begun. 
Ding, dong, my changeful song, 

Lively or slow, but never long. 
Ding, dong, ding dong bell ; 

Ding, dong, bell; ding, dong, bell. 



3 For fall five hundred years I've swung, 

In my crumbling turret high ; 
'Tis time my own death song were sung. 

And with truth before I die : 
I never could love the themes they gave, 

My tyranized tongue lo tell. 
One moment for cradle, the next for grave, 

They've worn out the old Church Bell. 
Ding, dong, my farewell song : 

Farewell novs , and farewell long. 
Ding, dong, ding dong bell : 

Ding, dong, bell ; ding, dong, bell. 



THE OLD ARM CHAIR.— iVo, 1. 



Sa 


































A 


3 


3 


5 


1 


3 1 


.2 R. 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


6 


I .5 R 


3 


3 1 


4c ' » 

S^orn not that old arm 
3a 


chair 


For it tells of the by-gone 


9 

time, "When 


my 


D 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 1 


.5 R 


5 


5 


6 


6 


6 


6 




1 .7 R 


5 


5 i 


4c » > > J f * 9 9 

So 



B l l llll Rll|g321ii.2Rllt 



72 NATIONAL TEMPEIIANCE SONGSTER. 

3o r\ 



A 3 


5 13 


l223456|F7665s4i.5R 


[| 


4c 

father's 
3a 


sire was 


» > ft > » 

seated there. In the glow of his youthful prime: 




D 5 


5 5 5 


i 5567*1 54432 |. 3 E, 


i 


4c 
3g 
B 1 




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111 


1 12 2 11 1 .1 R 


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4o 77» »» 76655 



Sg 




1 


2 
















A 5 


5 1 


7 


6 


1 .5- 3 


3 


1 3 3 


4 


6 ( 


.5- 


5 i 


4e » 
Seven 
3a 
D 3 

4c > 
3g 


> 
goodly 


sons 


had 


> 
he, And 


> 
a 


daughter 


chaste 
1 


and 


fair, 


3 1 


5 5 


4 4 


1 .2- 5 


5 


1 5 5 


6 


1 


.7- 


5 I 


> 






> 


> 












B 1 


1 1 


1 2 


3 2 


1 1 


1 


1 1 i 








1 1 


40 » 


» 






.5- ' 


» 




4 


6 


.5- 





So 



A 




6 


5 


5 1 


7 


6 


5 


6 


7 1 




3 


4 


5 


1 


.1- I! 


4c 

And 
3g 


all 


have 


played 


> 
about his knee, 


> 9 

As he dozed in 


, 7 
that old arm 


chair. 


D 


5 


4 


3 


3 


5 


4 


3 


4 


s4 


5 


5 


4 


3 


» 1 


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4c , , , » 

3o 



1 231 I 2 1121321 I .1- I 

4o 7 » ' > ' 5 5 



2 When his locks were white with age, 

The shadowy wrestler came ; 
And he left tbeni for their heritage, 

A poor, but an honest name. 
And what is a loftier gift, 

When he who with want bath striven, 
An unsbamed brow can meekly lift 

In the solemn face of Heaven ? 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 73 

3 And what is the conqueror's wrea.th, 

Or the clarion's loud acclaim, 
To him who lies in the lap of death, 

With a pure and a holy name ? 
Then guard that old arm chair. 

For it tells of the by-gone time, 
When my father's sire was seated there, 

In the glow of his youthful prime. 



THE OLD ARM CB.AIR.— No. 2. 



ip 



A 3 1 6 6 3 


1 663 1 5 2 1 53 1663! 


2s 

I love it, I love 
Ip 


it, and who shall dare, To chide me for 


G 1 1 3 3 1 


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2s > » 
Ip 


9 y ft 


A 5 3 2 1 1 


1 ||3i6 63|663|52i 


2s ' ' 6 

loving my old arm 
IP 


6 , , , , 

chair; I've treasured it long as a holy prize, 



G 21 ^1 1 ||1|331|331|22 

23 » » 7 6 6 

Ip 



A 533|663[53 



2s » » ' » ''.666 

> 9 

I've bedewed it with tears and embalmed it with sighs i 

.Ip 

; C 3~' l ^1 _| 3_ 3 1)21 | " "| 

2s ' * ' > » > 7 6 6 6 6 



2s 



316671 76|533|533|66yj 

» » » » 9 1 > » > > 

»Tis bound by a thousand bands to my heart, Not a tie will 
Ip ____-.__- -__o__ 

G "1 I 3 3 4 I 5'5 r 3 1 r"! 2 l^l"i 3 3 4 f 

23 » > > > » » * » 



74 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



Ip 1 




/^ 






/^s 


1 6 




A 


7 6 I 


5 3 2 


1 3 


ii 3 s5 1 


6 6 3 


3 I 


2s 

break, 
Ip 


not a 


Hnk wiU 


start ; 


VYould ye 


learn the 


speU, 


my 


5 


5 4 


1 3 2 


1 1 1 


1 2 1 


3 3 1 


1 3 


1 1 


9« 


> ♦ 






> > 


> > 







'2s 
Ip 


9 ♦ 


> > > 


> 






A 5 


5 2 1 5 3 3 


1 6 3 1 5 3 2 


1 1 


1 


II 


2s 

mother 
Ip 


gat there, And a 


9 > 

sacr^;d thing is that 


6 

old arm 


.6 

chair. 




C 2 

2s " » 


2 2 13 11 

9 > > 


1 3 1 1 2 1 

' 7 


1 


! 


« 


6 6 


.6 





2 I've sat and watched her many a da}^ 

When her eye grew dim and her locks were grey ; 
And I almost worshipped her when she smiled, 
And turned from her Bible to bless her child. 
Years rolled on, and tl^e last one sped — 
My idol had vanished, my earth-star fled : 
But I learned how mucii the heart can bear, 
When I saw her die in that old arm chair. 

3 With quivering lip and moistened eye, 

I think of the days tbr..t are long gone by ; 
And treasure the moments of joyous youth, 
When she taught me the lessons of love and truth, 
I turn with delight tcj her deep, deep love, 
And joy in the hope that I'll meet her above ; 
And often 1 come at the hour of prayer, 
To kneel beside that old arm chair. 



THE MISTLETOE BOUGH. 



IG 


2 111 


A 5| 555555 \ 5555 |6567 


6 7 1 9 9 9 II 


23s 9 999959 9 9 9999 

The banners all wave in the festive hall, 

The flowers are wreathing 


9 9 

the window and wall, 
1 


3|333333|3333|4345 


s4 5 1 7 6 5 Ii 



999999 9 9 999999 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



75 



la 




























/^ 


2 1 


1- 


A 5 


5 


1 5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 1 


6 


5 


6 


7 6 7 


i ' 


11 


23s »' »» ' 9 

And the tenants 
la 


9 

in 


9 9 

garments, new 


9 

and gay 


9 9 9 9 5 9 

, Have met to enjoy 


p 
the festal day. 
1- 


3 


3 


1 3 


3 


3 


3 


3 1 


3 


3 


3 


3 1 


4 


3 


4 


5 s4 5 


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23s 99 
la 


99 


9 
1 


9 
1 


9 

2 


1 


9 

2 


3 


9 
1 


1 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 9 9 


9 

1 


11 


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9 


9 


9 1 




9 




3 1 


4 


3 


4 


5 5 5 


1 5 9 


9 R 



'23s » 



9 9 9 9 9 9 



The landlord beheld, with a father's pride, 

His beautiful daughter this day a bride. 



lla 1 1 



1 12 12 



Ia 99 99 j 9 y 9 9 > 9 | 



3 11 



111- 



4 3 4 5 5 5 



23s 



9 9 9 9 9 9 



While her sparkling eyes and her brow so fair, 

Proclaim her the loveliest maiden there. 



la 1112 12 


3- 3- 




/^-N 


• 1- 


A 9 9 9 9 9 9 


< ' 


1 4 4 4 


6 5 5 


II 


23s 




9 9 9 


9 9 9 




Oh, what a bridal 


feast, 


Oh, what a 


- bridal 


- feast. 


lo /^^ 


1- 1- 




/'^ 




C 5 5 5 7 6 7 




12 2 2 


4 3 2 


.1- II 


23s 9 9 9 9 9 9 




9 9 9 


9 9 9 





2 The lable is cleared and the wine appears, 
And each to the bride a full bumper clears, 
"While with a blithe and joyous heart 

All the fair maids from the hall depart ; 
Oh, now are the sports of the day begun, 
Now is there drinking, and laughter, and fun j 
And toasts are repeated, and many a gay song 
Is heard with delight by that jovial throng. 

Oh, what a bridal feast. 

3 At length the long night begins to decline, 
And a bumper is filled of the strongest wine! 
A poltroon is he who drains not the whole, 
The last lingering drop of the well-filled bowl! 
The Bridegroom, though he can scarcely stand, 
Seizes the glass with a trembling hand. 

And drinking long life to his lovely bride, 
He falls down a corpse by her fathers side. 

Oh, what a bridal feast. 



76 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

4 He sleeps not alone in his early grave, 
The fair bride sleeps with the bridegroom brave. 
She heard of his fate with many a sad tear, 
And her young heart broke on her husband's bier, 
Oh, sad was their fate — but destructive wine, 
No tongue can recount what evils are thine; 
Thou hurriedst off in their joy and their bloom 
The maiden and youth to their early tomb. 

Oh, what a bridal feast. 

THE DRUNKARD IS FREE. 

Air — " King of the Wind.'''' Tune on page 117. 

1 I'm at home ! I'm at home ! in my peace and my pride, 
My wife and my child smile in joy by my side, 

From the haunts of the vicious where e'er they may be, 
I have burst in my strength, and the drunkard is free. 
No man e'er extended his sceptre to save, 
No actions of law snatched me forth from the grave, 
And ne'er shall I blush for the glorious hour, 

While the pen boasts its strength, or the pledge boasts its power 
Come ! come ! rally round us, the flag is unfurled, 
And it floats forth in beauty the pride of the world ; 
Cluick spread the sound o'er the land, o'er the sea, 
Jo3% joy to the world, for the drunkard is free. 

2 Away, then, away from the charms of the bowl, 
From the fires that have withered the light of the soul, 
'Tis here, friends, 'tis here, in the reign of peace. 
We seek our true pleasures and joys to increase, 
We need not the fires that flash o'er the brain, 

We need not the pleasures that lead but to pain. 

Here, here, do we seek true emotion to find, 

And boast of the triumphs of love and of mind. 

Up, up with the banner, the trumpet is heard, 

It streams forth aloft like the wing of a bird ; 

duick, quick, spread the sound, o'er the land, o'er the sea, 

Joy, joy to the world, for the drunkard is free. 



2a 




THE MOTHER'S 


APPEAL. 






A 1 


1 3- 


2 34 


1 .5 5 5 


4-345 1 


.3 llRl 


1 3- 


234 


i .5 5 1 


4c 

Oh! 
2g 


9 

spare my son, 


Rum-seller 


9 

Before it is too late ; Urge 


9 

him not on in 


madness, 


C 1 


1 1- 


1 2 


1 .3 3 3 


1 2-123 1 


.1 II Rl 


1 1- 


1 2 


' 3 3J 


4c 




7 

9 




9 






7 

9 





NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



77 



2g 








$ 










1 








A 


5 


4- 


3 4 2 1 


.1 II R 


1 


116 6 





.6 6 6 


1 6 7 


6 


1 .5 


II 


4c 9 

To meet the drunkard-s fate. 

2o $ 


It 


is I fear already Almost 


too late 


to 


save. 




C 


3 


2- 


1 2 1 


.1 II R 


1 


14 4 


4 1 


.4 4 4 


I 4654 


1 -3 


I! 


4c 






9 7 





















2a 




1- 




REP. 3s. & 5th and 6th lines. 


A 


R 5 


1 3 3 3 


• 5 5 


5 14-342 


1 .3 1 


4c 
2g 


For 


even now he 


neareth, 


9 

The drunkard's awful 


grave. 





R 3 


13-111 


1 .3 3 


3 12-12 


1 .1 I 


4c 




9 




9 7 





2a 



A Ti 5 



3 33| .5 5514-342 



.1- 



40 



For 



€ven now he neareth, The drunkard's awful grave. 



2g 



C » 8 f 5-666 

'4o " ' 



.3 3 3 



6-565 



.3- i; 



2 O spare my son, Rum-seller ; 

A mother asks the boon ; 
"Will you not hear her prayer? 

W^ill you not grant it soon? 
Or shall a mother's pleadings — 

A mother's tears be vain ? 
Will you not, ere he dieth, 

Give me him back again ? 

3 He v^as the sweetest flower, 

Our little flock among — ■ 
The pride of his fond father. 

Who died when he was young. 
He bore his father's image, 

But does not bear it now ; 
Yourcruelhand, Rum-seller, 

Has torn it from his brow. 

4 Oh ! spare my son, Rum-seller ! 

For a dear sister's sake ; 
If you with Rum destroy him, 
Her tender heart will break; 



78 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

She prays you spare her brother — 

She has a sister's love ; 
Will you for gain that's paltry, 
* , Too, her destroyer prove? 



5 He hath a soul, Hum-seller ! 

A soul of wond'rous cost! 
If he should die a drunkard, 

'Tw^ill be for ever lost. 
You know the truth most solemn, 

Which God to man has given ; 
No drunkard ever goeth, 

To dv^ell vrith him in Heaven, 



IlSriSrOCENCE. S. Wakefield. 



4g 


.^N 








/^N 
















A 

4c 

4a 


1 2 1 


3 


3 


3 


3 2 


3 


5 I 


6 


5- 


5 


5 


H 


9 9 

I think. 


9 

when 


9 
I 


9 9 

read 


9 

that 


9 

sweet 


9 

story 


99 
Of 


old, 




C 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 1 


4 


3- 


3 


3 


II 


4c 






9 


9 


9 7 

9 


9 


9 




9 


99 






4g 
























B 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1" 


1 


1 


II 


4c 






9 


9 




9 


9 




9 


99 







4g /"^ 


/'-^ 


1 




A 3- 2 1 2 1 


2 6 5 s4 


.5 !| R 3» 4 1 5 ' 7 6 5 3- 


4 { 


4c 9 99 7 9 

When Jesus was 

4G .^ 


9 9 9 9 

here among 


9 99 9 9 9 9 

men. How he called little children 


99 

as 


C 1- 1 


2 1 


1 R 1- 2 1 3 6 5 4 3 1- 


3 1 


4c 9 7 7 5 6 

99 9 9 

4o /--^ 


7 9 9 6 

9 9 


• 5 9 99 9 9 


99 


B 1- 1 1 


3 2 2 1 


|( R 1- 11111- 


1 


4c 9 5 5 5 9 


9 9 


.597 9 


7 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 79 



1 



7^5 II 5- 5 I 6535432 | 



4g 


lambs to his fold. 


I should 


like 


to have been with him then. 




Q 


3 6 5 4 3 II 


3- 3 1 


4 


3 13 2 1 1 .1 


11 


4c 
4a 


9 9 9 9 


9 99 




9 9 9 9 9 7 
9 




15 


1 1 1 1 II 


1- 1 


1 


11 1 .1 


(1 



4C ' ' 9 99 9 9 5 5 

9 

2 I wish that his hands had been placed on my head, 
That his arms had been thrown around me, 

That I might have seen his kind look when he said, 
" Let the little ones come unto me.'' 

3 Yet still to his footstool in prayer 1 may go, 
And ask for a share in his love ; 

And if I thus earnestly seek him below, 
I shall see him and hear him above ; 

4 In that beautiful place he has gone to prepare, 
For all who are washed and forgiven ; 

And many dear children are gathering there, 
" For of such is the kingdom of Heaven," 



SPARKLING AND BRIGHT. 



7g§ 



I 1 1 1 g 1 I I 2 I .1 1 I! 



4c 5 '9 75 5-5 675 

9 

Sparkling and bright in its liquid light, Is the -water in our glasses ; 

'Twill give you health — 'twill give you wealth, Ye lads and rosy lassies! 

7g$ 



B 1 1 


1 1 li 


4c 5 1111 33 

7Q --^ 


3-1 4 4 5 5 .11 

9 

P 


A 1 1 2 2 2- 2 1 3 3 


3- 1 1 4 4 3 3 1 .3 2 II 


4o 7 9 9 

9 

0, then resign your ruby wine, 

7g 


9 

Each smiling son and daughter; 
p 


B 1 111 


1- 1 1 1 .1 11 



4g5 55 6-5 90655 



80 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



1111 1 I 2 4 3 2 I .1 1 



4c 7655567 7? 

9 9 9 9 9 

There's naught so good for the youthful blood, 

Or sweet as the sparkling water. 

7g 

li ^N I \ ^ I !! 



4g54 3 3 32 1111 4455 .11 

9 9 

•2 Better than gold, is the water cold, 
From the crystal fountain flowing; 
A calm delight, both day and night, 
To happy home bestowing. 

O, then resign your ruby wine, &c. 

3 Sorrow has fled, from the heart that bled, 
Of the weeping wife and mother ; 
They have given up the poison cup, 
Son, husband, daughter, brother. 

O, then resign your ruby wine, &.c. 



THE CROOKED NECK'D GOURD. 

BY PERMISSION OF THE PROPRIETOR, MR. G, W. BRAINARD. 

^Vords by Sidney Dyer. Music by E. Z. Webster 

IG ,.-^ 1 /^ 



A 5 4 I 3 3- 3 3 4 5 I 6 6-6 6 7 | ' 7 6 5 5 4 | 4 3-3254) 



2oC 99 •9 99 99 999 99 99 9 99999 99 99 99 99 

The rich and the noble may spurn aught but gold, 

And drink for their pleasure the choicest of wine. Or 

iG. 



B 1 


I 1 


1- 


112 3 


1 4 4 


-3 3 


5 1 


5 


5 3 3 2 11 


1 




1 1 


23c 


9 


9 


99 9 9 9 


9 9 


99 


9 

2 


9 

2- 


9 9 9 9 9 
1 


9 7-6 

9 99 
1 


5 

9 


9 


i 3 


3- 


3 


4 3 4 


5 5- 


6 7 


9 


9 


99 7 7 6 7 


1. ' 7- 


6 


5 1! 


23c 9 9 
else for a 


99 9 9 9 9 9 99 

goblet their dainties to hold, 


9 9 9 9 9 99 9 

May seek for the ore of Potosi's rich mino ; 


,^ 1 


1- 


1 


1 1 


2 2- 


3 4 


5 


5- 


'65345 


1 5 5, 


4 


3 1! 



23c 9 9 99 7 9 7 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 81 

2c 2 2-22 11-111^ 1 3333 



A 


5| 


9 


9 


99 


' 7 5 1 


9 9 99 99 7 1 6S^5 


6 9 7 


i s5 7 


a 99 


99 99 


But ne'er to my lips ttUI it taste half so s-weet, 

From golden, or silver, 


9 9 9 9 9 

or crystal when poured, As the 
1 1 


jrf 


1 1 


4 


4 


-4 


5 4 3 


1 5 5-5 3 5 1 4-2 4 5 4 3 


5 5- 


6 6 


99 99 1 


2c 
2g 


4 


9 9 

2- 


99 


9 > 9 


9 9 99 9 9 99 9 

3 1- ^^ 


9 9 9 


9 9 


99 


1- 


A 


9 


9 


7 


5 


s4 5 


9 9 5 3 3 3 12- 


3 4 6 


5 4 


5 


9 3 5 



!3c 
cool sparkling drops which my thirsty lips meet, 

Just dipp'd from the spring with the crooked necked gourd. 

iG /^N 



B 6 5-5312 


6 5- 


3 111 






1 2 1 1 


11-11 


23c 9 9 99 9 9 9 

IG 3 3 4 2 


9 9 


99 99 59 

3 1- 


5- 

9 


6 7 

99 9 


9 9 9 
1 3 


9 9 99 

4 2-1 



A 99 99 I 9 9 7 5, s4 5 I 9 9 5 3 5 I 4.5 © 5 9 9 J^ 9 9 7 
2g 99 9 99 99~~~ 9^ ^9 9 99 9 9 99 

As the cool sparkling drops which my thirsty lips meet, 

Just dipp'd from the spring with the crooked neck'd gourd. 

I G 

B 111665312 I 6 5-3131 2- 143151 6 6-51 |I 

23c 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 99 9 9 99 9999 9 9" 9? 

2 The banqueting hall maj^ its riches display, 

And thousands attract to its pleasures again, 
Its visions of brightness will soon pass away, 

And naught but a sense of deception remain; 
Bat the innocent joys w^hich the heart often felt, 

With memory's bright pictures are carefully stored, 
And oft we revert to the time when we knelt, 

And dipped the cool draught in the crooked neck'd gourd. 

THE NIGHT WMD. l 
^1 .1 

A 5- 5 I 5 5 5 I 5 .5 ~5 \ 6 6 7" j [• 

3i y TT— r~ 9 ' 

T\'hen the night wind bewaileth the fall of the year. 

oG "^ ' 

^3- 3 I 3 2 3 I 3 . 1 3 | 4 4 s5 | 76 Tl 

3s 9 99 9 9 ~ 

So 

^L~^ ' 1|111|1 1|223| .4~|| 



RS 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



3a 


1- 
















/S 


A 


' 6 1 


5 


5 5 


1 


5 .3 


5 


.4 2 


> 

biat are 


3 5- 


3s 
3a 


As it sweeps 


from 


the 


9 

forest, 


9 

the 


9 

leayes t 


> 

sere, 


C 
3s 

3a 


6- 4 


3 


3 3 


1 


3 .1 


3 


1 .S 


1 


1 3- II 


9 >» 








9 


9 


7 

9 


7 

9 


> 


B 


3- 2 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




i 1) 


3s 


9 >» 








' .5 


9 


.7 


5 5 


.5 



3a 












.1 


A 


5 


5 1 


5 5 5 


1 5 .3 5 


16 6 7 


II 


3s 
3a 


9 

I 


9 

awake 


from my 


9 9 

slumbers and 


list to the 


roar, 


C 


3 


3 1 


3 3 3 


1 3 .1 3 ! 


4 4 s5 1 


.6 II 


3s » » » » 
3a 


B 


1 


1 1 


111 


1 1 11 


2 2 3 1 


.4 1! 


3s 


> 


9 




» .5 ' 







3g 


1- 
















/-N 




A 


' 


6 


.5 


6 4 1 


3 


.5 


3 1 


.4221 


3 5- 


il 


3s 
3a 


And 


it 


saith 


♦ 9 

to my 


> 
spirit, 


9 

No 


9 9 

more, Never 


9 

more, 




C 
3s~ 

3a 


6- 


4 


1 .3 


4 2 1 


3 


.1 


1 


1 .2 1 


1 3- 


II 


> 


99 




» 9 


9 




J 


7 7 

9 9 


9 




B 

3s 


3- 


2 


1 .1 


2 1 




.1 


1 


1 


1 


II 


» 




' 5 

9 


6 

> 




? 


.7 5 8 

9 9 


.5 





8a 


1- 




















A 


9 


6 


1 .5 


6 


4 


1 3 .5 3 


t .4 


2 


2 


1 .1 :i 


8s 
3o 


And 


» 

it 


salth 


9 

to 


9 

my 


9 9 

spirit, No 


more, 


Never 


more. 


G 


6^ 


4 


.3 


4 


2 1 


3 .1 1 


1 .2 






I .1 8 


3s 
3a 




» 




> 


> 


9 9 




7 

> 


7 

9 




B 


3- 


2 


.1 


2 


1 


.1 1 


1 






1 .1 t 


33 


9 


>> 




> 


5 


6 ' 


.7 


5 


6 





NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 83 

2 Throngh memory's chambers the forms of the past, 
The joys of my childhood come forth on the blast ; 
And the lost ones, whose beauty I used to adore, 

To my heart seems to murmur, No more, Never more. 

3 The trees of the forest shall blossom again ; 

And the song-bird shall carol a soul-thrilling strain; 
But the heart fate has wasted, no bloom shall restore: 
And its songs will be joyous. No more, Never more. 

I LOVE TO SING. l. 

Words by G, W. Bethune. 



6o § 



111 1 I g 2 2 3 I 4- 3 2 5 



8c 



6a 



I love to sing when I am glad, Song is the echo of 
I love to sing when I am sad, Till song makes sweet 






1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


5 


1 








1 


1 3- 


1 


7 


1 1 


3c 
6a § 






> 


9 








7 


7 


7 




9 




D 


3 


1 


5 


5 


5 


5 


1 


5 


5 


5 


5 


1 6- 


5 


5 


5 1 


3c 
6a § 






> 


> 








9 


9 






9 


19 






B I 1 1 1 


3o 
6a 


5 

1st 


TIMI 


5 

9 


5 

9 

REP. 


5 

Is. 


5 


2nd 


5 

9 
TIME 


5 

9 


5 


5 


4- 

9 


5 

>> 


5 


5 



31 2R|42311|3|55 6 3 



my gladness. 'Tis pleasant time, when 

my ------- very sadness. 

6a 1st TIME. REP. Is. 2Ni) TIME. 



cr~ 


R 1 




1 


11 


1 


3 


3 


3 


1 1 


3a 

6a 


6 5 5 5 

> ♦ » > 

1st TIME. REP. Is. 


6 5 5 

> > > 

2nd time. 


9 






9 
1 


9 
1 


1 


1 


D 


5 5 5 5 R 1 


6 5 5 


3 


1! 


5 


» 


9 






3c 
6a 


> > > » 

1st time. rep. Is. 


9 9 9 

2nd time. 


9 














B 


11 R 1 


1 


t 


II 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 I" 



58c » » 5 5 



84 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER 



6a 






























A 


6 


5 


5 


3 


5 


5 


5 


3 


1 


6 


5 


4 


2 


H 


So 

6g 


» 
Trices 


9 
chime, 


To 


> 
some 


> 

sweet 


rhyme 


in 


9 > 
concert 


> > 

only, 




C 


4: 


2 


3 


1 


1 3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


4 


2 






II 


So 
B 


9 


9 


1 


1 


9 

1 


9 
1 


1 


1 




9 


> 


7 
9 


5 




6 


7 






' 


> 






1 


6 


5 


5 


5 


!! 


80 > » > > > » 

Qq 


B 






1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 




1 










i! 


30 


4L 


5 






9 


> 




5 




4 


5 


5 


5 





6a 
A 










1 




















3 


1 5 


5 


5 


1 


7 


6 


5 


3 1 


4- 


3 2 5 1 


4 


2 


3 1 1! 


3o 

6g 
C " 


And 
1" 


> 

song, 

1^3- 


9 

to 

3 


me, is 
3~6 1 


> 
con 

~5 


> 
ipany, 


Good 


> 99 

company when 


> > 

I am 


» > 

lonely. 


4 


3 


1 1 


2- 


1 1 1 






1 !l 


3o 
6g 




f 
1 


> 

1 


1 


1 


> 
2 


> 
1 






9 


99 7 


6 

> 


5 

> 


5 » 

> 


D 


5 


1 ' 


9 




1 


» 


> 


7 


5'| 


6- 


5 4 3 1 


2 


5 


5 3 II 


3o 
6g 




















9 


j» 


9 


9 


9 9 


B 


1 


1 t 


1 


1 


1 1 








1 1 










1 !I 


bo 




9 


> 






5 


5 


5 




7- 


5 5 5 


4 


5 


5 > 



2 Whene'er I greet the morning light, 

My song goes forth in thankful numbers, 
And 'mid the shadows of the night, 

I sing me to my wekome slumbers. 
My heart is stirred by each glad bird, 

Whose notes are heard in summer bowers ; 
And song gives birth to friendly mirth, 

Around the hearth in wintry hours. 

3 Man first learned song in Paradise, 

From the bright angels o'er him singing 
And in our home above the skies, 

Glad anthems are for ever ringing ; 
God lends his ear, well pleased to hear; 

The songs that cheer his children's sorrow 
Till day shall break, and we shall wake. 

Where love will make unfading morrow 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 8o 

THE LAST LINK IS BROKEN. '^ 



IG 






/^^ 


r^ 


/-^ 1 3 


334 4333 322 2 


1 


A 


5 


5 56 


16 555 


5 444 


13 5 9 9 


' 


9 1 9 9 9 


9 j 9 9 9 9 j 


!l 


2s 9 9 ' 
The last tie 

IG 


9J99 9999 99 

is severed that bound me to thee, 

And the pledge I have taken has rendered me free. 


b 


3 


3 34 


1-4333 1 32221 135J556 


6555 


1 5444 1 


3 11 


2s 


9 


9 9 


9 9 9 9 


9 9 9 9 


9 9 


9 9 


9 9 9 9 


9 9 9 9 





iG 


/-^ 


/^ /^ 




^111 1 


-. ^1 


A 


k5| 5 5616555 


5444 1 43r5 | 


555 


1 699 9 1 9 


7 77 1 7 9 il 


2s 


99 99 9999 


9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 


9 9 


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Thy smiles so deceitful, May others beguile, 

But never 


ag-awi, 


Shalt thou 


7722/ life defile. 


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I have bowed at thy shrine, But that error is o'er ; 

I have tasted thy fruits, And now prize thee no more. 

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rhou hast mocked me, thou ' 


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mocJcer,^^ I think of thee yet, 

And thy stmgs I shall never. No 


, never forget. 
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*The subject of these lines fell a victim to the wine-cup ; his young and 
beautiful wife, with her sweet babe, died from r.eglect and ill treatment ; he 
awoke to a consciousness of his guilt and loss, dashed the ^^ mocker " from his 
hpf, but lives to lament his fall, dnd mourn in grief its ead re&ults 



86 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



10 




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Thou hast mocked me, thou " mocker^ 
And 


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thy stings I shall never, No, never forget. 


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5 My Mary's heart is broken, 
Once buoyant and free, 

And the cause of her grief 
Lies embosomed in thee. 

6 The pledge of our love 
Is now with her above, 

Where the weary find rest, 
And their souls dwell in love. 



7 O, how hast thou tortured 
The sad ones, now gone. 

And bereaved me, and left me, 
To sojourn alone. 

8 I loved them, I loved them, 
I think of them yet ! 

And shall ever lament them. 
Till life's sun is set. 



A PARODY. 

Tune — " Cottage Home,'' p. 217. 

1 I've been a slave fall long enough, 

And served my master well ; 
No more I'll drink your filthy stuff, 
King Bacchus, fare you well. 
Poor old Bacchus don't you cry for me, 

Cold water hence shall quench .my thirst, 
O, that's the drink for me. 

2 The old rumseller, in his cage, 

Has often filled my cup. 
And set my passions in a rage. 
But now I've given it up. 
O Rumseller, &c. 

3 I've mingled with the drunken crew, 

And passed the bottle round, 
Till I and they, the first we knew, 
Were stretched upon the ground. 
Poor old drunkards, &c. 

4 With moderate drinkers, too, I've spent, 

Some nights of revelry. 
And to the cause my influence lent 
Of inebriety. 
Moderate drinkers, &c. 

5 My old companions, all adieu. 

Ye Bacchanalian band — 
To you and all your drunken crew, 
I give a parting hand. 
Old companions^ &c. 



NATIONAL TEMPEKAKCB SONGSTER. 87 

JUBILEE SONG. 

Air — " Greenville.'' 



f6G_ 



D ^ 1 


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3 

REP. 


Hail! the Temp 
Hail ! redeemer 


ranee reformation, Swiftly 
of the nation, Worthy 


see it 
of our 


stride a - 
no - blest 


long! 
song! 


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REP. 


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Friends of Temp'rance, Friends of Temp'rance, 

5a /-^ r^ 


9 " REP. 1 & 2s. 
Let it echo loud and long. 


A 3 3- 4 1 5 5 I « 6 1 5- 4 3 II 


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2 Now the foe will quickly cower — 

From the cause of Temp'rance shrink: 
See it, by its matchless power, 

Snatch the wretch from ruin's brink ; 

Break his fetters, 
Tear asunder every link. 



3 It is tens of thousands saving 

From a drankard's grave and hell ; 
And our flag is proudly waving, 
Where Intemp'rauce used to dwell 

Man or Angel 
Never can its value tell. 

4 Homes, where dwelt loud desolation, 

Now abound with comforts rare : 
And in place of profanation, 
We can hear the voice of prayer : 

Peace and Temp'rance 
Reign iu ha,ppy concord there. 



88 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER^ 

5 Thoui^h we triumpli, gracious Heaven 

jStill we much assistance need ; 
Let tby helping hand be given, 
More the glorious v^^ork to speed : 

For the drunkard, 
For the sufferer, Lord, we plead. 

6 Bless each Temp'rance celebration — 

Every banner now unfurled — 
Bless the march of reformation 

Every where throughout the world ; 

To oblivion 
Let the monster quick be hurled. 



AN INVITATION TO TEE-TOTALISM. 

Air — ''Belay Not.'' 
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Pelay not, delay 
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not — drunkard draw 


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near, The 


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pure crystal 


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stream is now flowing for thee; No price is de - manded — it 
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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



89 



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runs 

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cool and clear 


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; To thee it is offered, for 
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2 Delay not an hour — why longer abuse 

Thy mental and physical powers with wine ? 
The fountain is open — O canst thou refuse, 

When health bids thee welcome to bow at her shrine ? 

3 Delay not a moment — for near is the daj'- 

In which the steeled rumseller's business will cease, 
On the health and the pockets of tipplers to prey, 
Or to rob wives and children of comfort and peace. 

4 Delay not, delay not — thy tremulous frame 

Will, if longer abused, fill a suicide's grave. 
Be a man — leave behind thee a virtuous fame — 

Embrace Total Abstinence — naught else will thee save. 



LIFT NOT THE WmE CUP. 

Air — ''Delay Not:' 

1 Oh ! soft sleep the hills in their sunny repose, 

In the lands of the south where the vine gaily grows, 
And blithesome the hearts of the vintagers be. 
In the grape purple vales, in the isles of the sea. 

2 And fair is the wine when its splendor is poured 
'Mid silver and gold round the festival board, 
When the magic of music awakes in its power, 
And wit gilds the fast falling sands of the hour. 

3 Yet lift not the wine cup, though pleasure may swim 
'Mid the bubbles that flash round i'ts roseate brim ; 
For dark in the depths of the fountain below. 

Lurk the sirens that lure to the vortex of woe. 

4 They have led the gay spirit of childhood astray, 
While it dreamed not of wiles on its radiant way ; 

And the soft cheek of beauty they've robbed of its bloom, 
And quenched her bright eyos in the damps of the tomb. 



90 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

5 They have torn the live wreath from the brow of the brave, 

Ami changed his proud heart to the heart of a slave ; 
And e'en the fair fame of the good and the just, 

With the gray hairs of age they have trod to the dust. 

6 Then lift not the wine cup, though pleasure may swim 

Like an angel of light round its roseate brim ; 
For dark in the depths of the fountain below, 
Lurks the sirens that lure to the vortex of woe. 



LAND OF COLUMBIA. 

Tune — '* DaugJiter of Zion.'' 



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Land of Cohimbia ! awake from thy 
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slumbers, 


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wake for thy 


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foe 
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is oppressing thee 


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9 99 

sore ; Down the dark stream of Intemp 'ranee what 


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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 91 

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Land of Columbia ! awake from thy slumbers, Awake, e'er thou fall to re- 
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92 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



2 Land of Columbia! thy sons are enslaved, 

A tyrant infernal has bound them in chains ; 
Arise in thy might, let thy children be saved, 

JSxpel the dread foe from thy mountains and plains. 
Land of Columbia! thy sons are enslaved, 

Awake, e'er they sink where despair ever reigns. 

3 Land of Columbia ! the morning hath gleamed. 

The day star of temp'rance ascendeth the skies ; 
Awake to the light that from heaven hath beamed, 

No more let the darkness o'ershadow thine eyes. 
Land of Columbia! the morning hath gleamed, 

Now, hail its bright rays with soul-cheering cries. 

4 Land of Columbia ! awake to thy glory ! 

And let thy blest influence be felt the world o'er ; 
Awake, till intemp'rance be known but in story. 

Awake, till its foes shall oppress thee no more ! 
Land of Columbia ! awake to thy glory ! 

Awake ! ! and the foe shall oppress thee no more ! 



REPOSE. 



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in 


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heaven — my 


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home is 
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not 


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KATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 
/^ 11-1 



93 



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shortens 


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thy journey and 


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hastens thee 
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.6 

2 A pilgrim and stranger, I seek not my bliss, 

Nor lay up my treasures in regions like this ; 
I look for a mansion which bands have not piled — 
I long for a city by sin undefiled. 

3 Though foes and afflictions my progress oppose, 

They only make heaven more sweet at the close j 
Come joy or come sorrow — the worst may befall, 
One moment in glory makes up for them all. 

4 The thorn and the thistle, around me may grow, 

I would not repose me on roses below ; 
I ask not my portion — I seek not my rest, 
Till seated with Jesus, I lean on his breast. 

5 No scrip for my journey — no staff in my hand, 

A pilgrim impatient I press to that land ; 
The path may be rugged, it cannot be long-— 
With hope I'll beguile it, and cheer it with song. 

WE HAVE BEEN FRIENDS TOGETHER, l. 



2g 




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We 
2a 


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haye been friends 


9 9 

together, In 


> > > > 
sunshine and in 


shade ; 


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94 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2a 11112 



A ! ■ I 3 5 5 6 I 5 > > | 7 ' 7 _| 

23q , , , 

Since first beneath the chestnut trees, In infancy we played. 
2a 



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coldness dwells within thy heart, A cloud is 


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thy 


brow; 


6- 

230 

2a 


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have been friends together, Shall a light word 


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part us 


now? 


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2 We have been gay together; 

We have laughed at little jests ; 
For the fount of hope was gushing 

Warm and joyous m our breasts. 
But laughter now hath fled tliy lip, 

And sullen glooms thy brow ; 
We have been gay together — 

Shall a light word part us now ? 

3 We have been sad together, 

We have wept with bitter tears, 
O'er the grass-grown graves where slumbered 

The hopes of early years. 
The voices which are silent there. 

Would bid thee clear thy brow; 
We have been sad together — 

Oh ! what shall part us now ? 



MARIANNA. l. 9a 
|8? 

A 3i6333|4S%2|31 | 1 2 3 r 

J4s> >>»> >»>> ''76 * 9 9 

9 9 

With blackest moss the flower-plots, Were thickly crusted, one and all; 
The nisted nails fell from the knots. That held the peach tree to the wall : 

|3p 1 _p^ 1 p. 

A 3 |66 ' y i653 3|66 ' 7|«35 Ilii 

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The broken sheds looked sad and strange, Unlifted was the clinking latch ; 
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Upon 


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lonely moated grange. 


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She only said, "I'm yery dreary, He cometh not," she said, 
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She said, " I am aweary, weary, I would that I were dead." 
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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 

2 Her tears fell with the dews at even, 

Her tears fell e'er the dews were dried j 
She could not look on the sweet heaven, 

Either at morn or eventide. 
After the flitting of the bats, 

When thickest dark did trance the sky. 

She drew her casement curtain by, 
And glanced athwart the gloomy flats. 

She only said, " The night is dreary, 
He cometh not," she said; 

She said, "I am aweaiy, weary— 
I would that I were dead!" 

3 About a stone-cast from the wall, 

A sluice with blackened waters slept, 
And o'er it many, round and small, 

The clustered marishmo?ses crept. 
Hard by a poplar shook alway, 

All silver green with gnarled bark, 

For leagues no other tree did dark 
The level waste, the rounding gray. 

She only said, " My life is dreary, 
He cometh not," she said; 

She said, " I am aweary, weai'y— 
I would that I were dead !" 

4 And ever when the moon was low, 

And the shrill winds were up and away, 
In the white curtain, to and fro, 

She saw the gusty shadow sway. 
But when the moon was ver^?- low. 

And wild winds bound within their cell, 

The shadow of the poplar fell 
Upon her bed, across her brow. 

She only said, " The night is dreary, 
He cometh not," she said; 

She said, " I am aweary, weary — 
I would that I were dead !" 

5 All day within the dreamy house, 

The doors upon their hinges creaked ; 
The blue fly sung in the pane ; the mouse 

Behind the mouldering wainscot shrieked. 
Or from the crevice peered about, 

Old faces glimmered through the doors, 

Old footsteps trod the upper floor«, 
Old voices called her from without. 

She only said, " My life is dreary. 
He cometh not," she said ; 

She said. " I am aweary, weary 
I would that I were deat^ ■" 



LOOK ALOFT. 

From ^^Harp of the West," hy permission. 



97 



50 SOFT. 


































A 


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if thy footing should fail, If thine eye should grow dim, and thy caution depart, 



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98 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 If the friend who embraced in prosperity's glow, 
With a smile for each joy, and a tear for each woe, 
Should betray thee, when sorrow-like clouds are arrayed, 
" Look aloft I" to the friendship which never will fade. 

3 Should the visions which hope spreads in light to thine eye. 
Like the tints of the rainbow, but brighten to fly. 

Then turn, and in tears of repentant regret, 
" Look aloft V to the sun that is never to set. 

" 4 Should they who are dearest — the son of thy heart) 
The wife of thy bosom, in sorrow depart 
To that soil where affection is ever in bloom 
'^Look aloft!" from the darkness and dust of the tomb. 

WASHINGTON. 

Arranged hy L. W. Denny. 



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Thy children thro' all coming time, Shall hless the name of Washington. 
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2 The conquerors of other days, 

Fought well for glory and renown ; 
Yet not for honor or for praise, 
For liberty, fought Washington. 

3 The loud-mouthed cannon's awful roar, 

The shock of host encountering host: 
The field of carnage died in gore. 

The loved ones mourning for the lost. 

4 Were scenes that tried men's souls, but those 

He heeded not, but still pressed on, 
' Till victory o'er freedom's foes, 

WaB nobly gained by Washington. L. 



FREEDOM. 



99 



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ight To hold their revels 
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wing, 








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There's freedom in the deep wild wood, 

And in the lonely glen, 
And freedom in vast solitude, 

Far from the haunts of men. 
But in the city and the town, 

The Tyrant, Fashion, reigns 
With iron sway, and fools have grown, 

To love the Despot's chains. L. 



THE SILVER CORD. 

By O. B, Lesher. 



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100 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



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2 The golden bowl is broken, 

That held the vital spark, 
The lips which oft have spoken 

Are still, the eyes are dark: 
The soul, to God who gave it 

Has winged its rapid way. 
With him who died to save it, 

To dwell in light for aye : — 
Tho* the golden bowl is broken, 

The spirit lives alway. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 101 

3 The cistern wheel is broken, 

Checked is the fount of life, 
Silent is every token 

Of nature's jarring strife. 
The promise we inherit, 

That there will come a day, ,. 

When each immortal spirit, 

Shall seek its kindred clay : 
Though the cistern wheel be broken, 

Yet man shall live alway. j, 



LONG, LONG AGO. 

1 Where are the friends that to me were so dear, 

Long, long ago — long, long ago ? 
Where are the hopes that my heart used to cheer, 

Long, long ago — long ago ? 
Friends that I loved in their graves are laid low, 
Hopes that I cherished are fled from me now, 
I am degraded, for rum was my foe. 

Long, long ago — long ago. 



2 Sadly my wife bowed her beautiful head, 

Long, long ago — long, long ago. 
Oil, how I wept when I found she was dead! 

Long, long ago — long ago. 
She was my angel, my love and my guide ; 
Vainly to save me from ruin she tried. 
Poor broken hearted ! — 'twas well that she died, 

Long, long ago — long ago. 



3 Let me look back on the days of my youth, 
Long, long ago — long, long ago. 

I was no stranger to virtue and truth. 
Long, long ago — long 'd^o. 

Oh, for the" hopes that were pure as the day ! 

Oh, for the joys that were purer than they ! 

Oil. for the hours that I've squandered away ! 
Lon^g, long ago — long ago. 



102 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

THE JOYFUL WIFE. 

Tune — " Indianapolis.''^ 
7g /^s 



111 3» 3111 i 1 i |lia|335|531i .S j) 



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Flow gently thou tear drop down woman's fair cheek, 

Thou tellest of joys that the tongue cannot speak ; 
7o 



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Full many a tear of sorrow she has shed, 

Full often enough has her wounded heart bled. 



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But now — now she weeps that the lost has returned, 

And pillowed his head on the bosom that burned 
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With the flame of affection, she could not restrain. 

Her husband was dead^ now liveth 


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3 The hearth once deserted, and cheerless, and cold, 
Now witnesseth beauty and love as of old ; 

The altar now smokes with devotion's pure flame, 
And incense ascends to the Deity's name. 

4 The peace and contentment pervading the mind 
Is as calm and as sweet as summer's soft wind ; 
Pure faith and bright hope, like twin sisters stand, 
Pointing the way to the blest spirit-land. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



103 



TOUCH NOT THE CUP. 

Tune — " FarcwellP 



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. Touch not the cup ; 


it is death to thy soul ; 


Touch not the cup, 


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Touch not the cup^ touch it not. 

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Touch not the cup, touch it nofc. Little they thought that the demon was there, 

2 Touch not the cup when the wine crlistens bright; 

Touch not the cup, touch not the cap, 
Though like the ruby it shines in the liijht, 

Touch not the cup, touch it not. 
The fan-TS of the serpent are hi<i in the bowl; 
Deeply the poison will enter thy sou! ; 
Soon it will plunge thee beyond' thy control, 

Touch not the cup, toucii it not. 

3 Touch not the cup, young man, in thy pride; 

Touch not ihe cup, touch not the cup. 
Hark to tlie warning of thousands who've died; 

Touch not the cup, touch it not, 
Go to their lonely and desolate tomb , 
Think of their deatli. of their sorrow and gloom ; 
Think that perhaps thou raay'st share in their doom! 

Touch not the cup. touch it not. 



104 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



4 Toucli not the cup ; drink not a drop ; 

Touch not the cup, touch not the cup ; 
All that thou lovest entreat thee to stop ; 

Touch not the cup, touch it not. 
Stop for the home, that to thee is so near ; 
Stop for thy friends, that to thee are so dear ; 
Stop for thy country, the God that you fear; 

Touch not the cup, touch it not. 



THE MUSIC OF TEMPERANCE. 

Tune — " Resplendciice.'' 



A A 2 I 3 3 4 3 I 3 2 a 3 a I 1 *2 



1 2 I 3 3 4 3 I 



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What fairy like music steals over the sea. 



9 9 9 9 

En - trancing the 



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senses with charmed melody, 'Tis the sweet song of temp'rance that 



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floats o'er the main, In - riting in - 
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join in the strain. 


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2 Oh, come, beloved brother! we are vi^aiting for thee. 
Come, throw off the yoke, and resolve to be free ; 
And make glad the heart of thy mother once more, 
Who has long wept in silence, thy loss to deplore. 

3 Oh, come to thy sister ! you '11 find her the same, 
Although you have caused her much ani^uish and shame; 
Oh. come, take the pledge I and resolve to be wise, 
While songs of devotion ascend to the skies. 

4 What fairy like music steals over the sea, 
Entrancing the senses with charmed melody ? 

*Tis the sweet song of temp'rance that floats on the air, 
Inviting all classes its comforts to share. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 103 

NEW HAIL COLUMBIA. 

1 Hail Columbia, happy land ; — 
Hail ye Washingtonian band, 

Who struggle in fair Freedom's cause, 
With sterner foes than British laws ; 
And when the moral strife is done, 
What glorious trophies will be won; 
A nation saved, will be' your boast — 
How rich the prize — how light the cost; 
Gladness lights each mother's eyes — 
Grateful prayers reach to the skies. 

Firm, united, let us be, 

Rallying: round our liberty ; 

We, a band of brothers joined, 

Glorious peace and plenty find. 

2 Sound — sound the trump of fame, 
Lo ! Washington's great name, 
Again connected with our cause, 

Knii^s through the world with loud applause ; 

His name — to ancieni freemen dear, 

WiLh purer pleasure hlls each ear, 

Than when from old Britain s power 

It wrested Freedom, Heaven's dower; — 

Now, linked with temperance on each breeze 

It floats the messenger of peace. 

Firm, united, let us be. 

Rallying round our liberty ; 

We, a band of brothers joined, 

Glorious peace and plenty find. 

WHERE DOES THE BLAME LIE? 

Tune — " Neio Home: ' 

1 O pity me, lady; I'm hungry and cold ; 
Should 1 all my sorrows unto you unfold, 

I'm sure your kind breast with compassion would flame ; 
My father's a drunkard — but Fm not to blame. 

2 My mother's consumptive, and soon will depart, 
Her feorrows and trials have broken her heart; 
My poor little sisters are starving! O, shame! 
Our fathers a drunkard — but we're not to blame^ 

3 Time was, we were happv, with plenty and peace, 
And every day saw our pleasures increase ; 

O, then with what kindness we'd lisp forth his name! 
But now he's a drunkard — yet were riot to blame* 



106 KATI017AL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

4 Time was, when each morning, around the fireside, 
Our sire in the midst like a saint would preside, 

And kneel, and for blessings would call on God's name. 
But now he's a drunkard — but we're not to blame. 

5 Oar father then loved us, and all was delight, 
Until he partook of this withering blight, 

And sunk ids poor family in misery and shame, 
O yes, he's a drunkard! — but ice' re not to blame. 

G My poor dying mother, must she feel the scorn ? 
Must she be forsaken, to perish forlorn? 

grief! when we call on that blessed name, 

1 might well ask the world, can that saiiU be to blame 7 

7 My sisters, poor orphans! O, what have they done 1 
Why should you neglect them, or why will yow shun? 
Let not foul disgrace be attached to their nanie, 
Though their father's a drunkard, they arc not to blame. 

THE DRUNKARD'S WIFE. 

Tune — " Thanksgiving'' 



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s wife breatheth her prayer, 

Sadly her bosom heaves wild with despair ; 


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Saying, For thee I pine, mourning alone, 

Wanderer, wanderer, come to thy home. 


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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 107 

2 He, with the revelers, merrily sun.^, 
Wildly he raised his voice madly in song: 
She in a mourning voice blended her tone, 
Wanderer, wanderer, come to thy home. 

3 Hark! 'tis her husband's voice rings in her ear, 
See how her up-turned eye melts with the tear ; 
Wife of my bosom, see ! I am come : 

Gome, like a wanderer, back to my home. 

4 Brightly the drunliard's home shines in the ray, 
Sweetly the drunkard's wife smileth to-day; 
Drunkard no longer, her husband is come. 
Happiness, happiness brightens their home ! 

HURRAH FOR THE PLEDGE. 

Tune — " TJic Brave Old Oakr 

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1 Hurrah for the pledge, the temperance pledge, Hurrah for the men who sign ! 
There's might in the soul who can dash the bowl, And all his drinks resign I 
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2 iJut when he signed the Temperance Pledge, And hath in his strength arose, 
He feels secure, for his triumph is sure ; Though many and strong be his foes : 

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The drunkard awakes with his palsied shakes, 

And says he will drink no more ; But his promise is vain, for he 
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Rum-sellers may jeer, the drinkers may sneer, 

And laugh at the men who sign ; But great is the soul who can dash 
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108 NATIONAL TEMPERAKC£ SONGSTER. 

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drinks again Hurrah for the pledge, the Tern- 

Before the day is o'er. 



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the howl, Hurrah for the pledge, the Tem- 

And all his drinks resign. 
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perance pledge, Hurrah for the men who sign ; And all his drinks resign. 
There's might in the soul who can dash the bowl, 
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perance pledge, Hurrah for the men who sign ! And all his drinks resigo. 
There's might in the soul who can dash the bowJ, 
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99 

THE COMBmATION OF TRADES. 

TuNE"— " The Song- of Freedom:' p. 224, 
1 Times won't be grood 'tis plain to see, 
Till we're rid of Alcohol. 
And then we'll have a glorious time, 

To roll the temperance ball ; 
Then let us rouse with mii^'ht and main, 

Together one and all. 
And work, and work, and work, and work. 
Against old Alcohol. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 109 

2 The farmers want good times again, 

To sell tbeir wheat and pork ; 
And to get rid of Alcohol, 

They're going right to work. 
They'll plow, and reap, and sow, and mow, 

And gather their crops next fall, 
And thrash, and ihrash, and thrash, and thrash. 

And thrash old Alcohol. 

3 The laboring men they want more work, 

And higher wages too ; 
They'll help to roll the temperance ball, 

With better times in view ; 
They'll saw, and chop, and grub, and dig; 

And shovel, and shovel awaj, 
Without a drop of Alcohol, 

By night or yet by day. 

4 The tailors, too, they're on the spot, 

To roll the temperance ball ; 
They know they never got a job 

From old King Alcohol ; 
They'll cut, and baste, and cabbage, and spoiige» 

And press, and sew, and hem, 
And stitch, and stitch, and stitch, and stitch. 

For all the temperance men. 

5 Shoemakers, too, with right good will, 

"Will join the working throng, 
And what they do for temperance, 

They'll do both neat and strong ; 
They'll cut, and crimp, and last, and stitch, 

And peg, and black, and ball ; 
And peg, and peg, and peg, and peg, 

And peg old Alcohol. 

6 The hatters do not want to see 

Their kettle standing dry; 
Just give them room to sign the pledge. 

And then the fur will fly; 
They'll nap, and block, and collar, and bind, 

Together one and all, 
And finish, and finish, and finish, and finish, 

And finish old Alcohol. 

7 The blacksmiths they will roll up sleeves, 

And make their sledges swing, 
And in the cause of temperance, 

They'll make their anvils ring ; 
They'll blow, and strike, and forge, and weld, 

And make the cinders fly. 
And hammer, and hammer, and hammer, and hammer. 

For Alcohol must dio. 



110 



NATIOKAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



8 The butchers they are on the spot, 

With knives and aprons all, 
And ready are to go to work. 

To dress old Alcohol ; 
They'll cut, and dress, and carve, and stick, 

His carcass they will spoil, 
And carve, and carve, and carve, and carve, 

And carve old Alcohol. 

9 The tanners they have volunteered 

To take his hide to tan. 
And take it to the fair next year, 

To be held in Birmingham ; 
They'll beam, and break, and lime, and bate, 

And tan, and tan it well, 
And draw a premium on the hide 

Of old King Alcohol. 

10 The coopers they are on the way 

With barrels ready made, 
To pack aw'ay old Alcohol, 

And send him to the shade ; 
They'll raise, and crause, and guage, and hoop, 

With hoops both great and small, 
And hoop, and hoop, and hoop, and hoop, 

And hoop old Alcohol. 

11 And thus we'll shoat. and thus we'll sing, 

Until our journey s o'er; 
A glorious victory we'll obtain. 

When Alchy is no more. 
Then let us rouse, with might and main, 

Together one and all, 
And shout, huzza for temperance. 

And down with Alcohol, 



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PASSING AWAY. 



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We're passing from the earth away, As mists before the sun; 
Our eyes scarce open on the day, Be - fore our race is run : 



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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. j | | 



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2 We 're passing from the earthy, as falls 

The grass before the blade; 
Our wealth, our fame, our honors, all 
Will soon be lowly laid. 

3 "Our fathers, where are they? and do 

The prophets live alway?" 
Ah! no! How mournful 'tis, how true* 
They all have passed away. 

4 We're passing from the earth, as flax 

Is by tho fire consumed, 
Or high, or low, death's scj^the attacks. 
And brings all to the tomb. 

5 We 're passing down the stream of life^ 

Swift as the weaver's thread; 

Soon there will be an end of strife, 

Soon we shall join the dead, 

6 Then let us hear and heed the word, 

To us in mercy given, 
Believe, repent, obey the Lord 

And seek the bliss of Heaven. I 



112 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

MY OWN TEMPERANCE HOME 

Tune — '- Siviss." 



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Why, why my heart this sadness ! Why 'mid scenes like this repine ? 

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When those I love are filled with gladness. Because I've left the sparkling wine. 

Because I've left the sparkling wine. 
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2 Oh ! I've injured those that loved me, 

Bound by nature's dearest ties ; 
The voice of " Father, do not leave me, 
Oh ! leave your cups, be vt^ise, be vi^ise.'' 
Oh ! leave your cups, be wise, be wise. 

3 These are the sounds that still are ringing, 

Through this care worn frame of mine : 
But hark ! I hear the voice of singing, 
*• Oh! Fathrr's left the sparkling wine ! " 
Oh ! Father's left the sparkling wine ! 

4 Give me joys — I ask no other — 

Joys that bless my humble dome, 
Wliere dwell my daughter and her mother, 
Oh give me back my temp'rance home, 
Oh give me back my temp'rance home. 

5 Joyfal tidings still are swelling, 

Where long such greetings were unknown; 
The pledge brought them to every dwelling, 
Oh give me back my temp'rance home, 
My own, my own, dear temp'rance home. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 113 

GOD SAVE THE DRUNKARD. 

Tune — •" Columbia." 

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Lord, from thy glorious 

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2 The arms of wicked men 
Do thou with might restrain, — 

God save the poor. 
Raise thou their lowliness, 
Succor thou their distress, 
Thou whom the meanest bl^ss, — 

God save the poor. 



114 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

3 Give tbem staunch honesty, 
Let their pride manly be, — 

God save the poor. 
Help them to hold the right, 
Give them both truth and might. 
Lord of all life and light, — 

God save the poor. 

4 O God, our cause maintain, 
Hemove the drunkard's stain, — 

God save the poor. 
Now, O teetotal band, 
Press forward heart and hand, 
God by our side will stand, — 

God save the poor. 



^^ ^ OUR NATIVE SONG. 




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love our native song ! 


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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 115 



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2 The one who bears the felon's brand, 

With moody brow and darkened name, 
Thrust meanly from his father-land, 

To languish out a life of shame ! 
Oh ! let him hear some simple strain, 

Some lay his mother taught her boy- 
He '11 feel the charm, and dream again 

Of home, of innocence, and joy! 
The sigh will burst, the drops will start, 

And all of virtue, buried long, 
The best, and purest in his heart, 

Is waken 'd by his native song. 

3 Self-exiled from our place of birth, 

To climes more fragrant, bright, and gay, 
The memory of our own fair earth 

May chance awhile to fade away : 
But should some minstrel echo fall, 

Or chords that breathe our country's fame, 
Our souls will burn, our spirits yearn, 

True to the land we love and claim. 
The high ! the low ! in weal or woe, 

Be sure there's something coldlj'- wreng 
About the heart that does not glow 

To hear its own, its native song. e. cook 



116 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

OPENING SONG. 

* Tune — ''Life let us cherish J' 



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Joy let us nour - ish, With guardian angels' care! 



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Then shall we flour - ish, Fruit - ful and fair. 



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KATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 117 

2 Thoughtful, yet cheerful, 

Through life we'll glide along, 
Sometimes all tearful, 
Sometimes all song. 
God's bounty may we keep with care, 
Our goods with others freely share, 
What bows another, help to bear — 
No murmur, nor repine. 
Loving, we'll cluster, 

Like grapes upon the vine ; 
Faithful, we'll cluster, 
This fane divine. 



THE KING OF THE WIND. 



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He exulted all 

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the ice-pillared gates of the north, And away on his hurricane 
free in his might and his speed, He mocked at the lion and 


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wings he rushed forth ; He whistled a - long thro' each crany and creek ; He 
taunted the steed ; 

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118 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



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laggard behind. And alone 


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in his flight sped the king of the wind 




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2 He swept o'er the earth — the tall battlements fell, 
And he laughed as they crumbled, with maniac yell; 
The broad oak of the wood dared to wrestle again, 
'Till wild in his fury, he rent it in twain ; 
He grappled with pyramids, works of an age ; 
And dire records were left of his havoc and rage, 
No power could brave him, no fetters could bind. 
Supreme in his sway was the king of the wind. 



THE TEMPERANCE BANNER. 

Tune — " The Star Spangled Banner.'' 

I' Oh ! say don't you see as in triumph it waves, 
Yon high floating banner, the emblem of virtue. 
As a beacon it shines the inebriate to save. 
It points to salvation from wine's base allurements. 
In language that's clear, 
It speaks to the ear, 
Stop, mortal, reflect ! of the wine-cup beware ! 
'Tis the temperance banner, and long may it wave, 
The emblem of virtue, the drunkard to save. 

:i Long, long had the tyrant old Alcohol reigned, 
And spread devastation in every department ; 
While millions, his victims, were annually ilain. 
And hundreds and thousands died broken hearted ; 
But lo ! from above 
The angel of love 
Presented this emblem, and faithful 't will prove ; 
^Tis the temperance banner, and long may it wave, 
The emblem of virtue, the drunkard to save. 

\ Oh haste, then, ye tipplers, no longer delay, 

Let reason direct you to shun each temptation ; 
Sign your name to the pledge, 'tis the only sure way, 
To save you from sinking in low degradation ; 
For conquer we must, 
Our cause it is just, 
Pure water's our motto, in God is our trust ; 
The temperance banner, long, long may it wave, 
The emblem of virtue, the drunkard to save. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 119 

4 Then come, ye teetotallers, both aged and youth, 
Stand firm to your pledge, a phalanx undivided ; 
Your conquest is certain, you 're lighting for trulh, 
The victory is ours, the enemy's routed : 
Then farewell to wine, 
See the pure water shine, 
The beverage of Eden when man was in prime ; 
The temperance banner, O long may it wave, 
The emblem of virtue, the drunkard to save. 



THE CUP FOR ME. by w. denton. music by l. 

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There is a cup which drunkards fill, With drink that demons vile distill, 
A gleaming smile it wears, but oh ! The sting of death lies hid below : 

'Tis full of grief and misery, 

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But that is not the cup for me. 

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There is a cup by temperance filled, 
With nectar from the clouds distilled ; 
There's knowledge, pleasure, life, and wit; 
Health, ]ove and joy and peace in it : — 
Our FATHER made it for the free, 
And that's the cup, dear friends, for me. 



120 



FRIENDSHIP. Irish Melody. 



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SWEET HOME. 121 



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122 

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NATIONAL 


TEMPERANCE 

Chorus. 


SONGSTi^T., 








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2 An exile from home ! splendor dazzles in vain, 
Oh ! give me my lowly thatched cottage again : 
The birds singing gaily that carae at my call, 
Give me them with the peace of mind dearer than ail 

Home ! home ! sweet home ! 

There 's no place like home ! 

There *s no place liko home ! 



MARIANA IN THE SOUTH, l. 123 



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Jlt4 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 

2 She, as lier carol satMer grew, 

From brow and bosom slowly down 

Through rosy tapers fingers drew 
Her streaming curls of deepest brcwn 

To left and right, and made appear, 
Still-lighted in a secret shrine 
Her melancholy eyes divine, 
The home of woe without a tear. 

She ever breathed a weary moan. 

And murmuring, both at night and morn, 

She said, " My Spirit is here alone, 
Walks forgotten, and is forlorn." 

3 Nor bird would sing, nor lamb would bleat, 

Nor any cloud would cross the vault. 
But day increased from heat to heat, 

On stony drought and steaming salt; 
Till now at noon she slept again, 

And seemed knee-deep in mountain grass, 

And heard her native breezes pass, 

And runlets babbling down the glen. 
She breathed in sleep a lower moan. 

And murmuring, as at night and morn, 
She thought, "My Spirit is here alone, 

Walks forgotten, and is forlorn.'* 

4 Dreaming, she knew it was a dream : 

She felt he was and was not there. 
She woke : the babble of the stream 

Fell, and without the steady glare 
Shrank the sick olive sere and small. 

The river-bed was dusty white ; 

And all the furnace of the light 

Struck up against the blinding wall. 
She whispered, with a stifled moan 

More inward than at night or morn, 
''Leave me. Oh! leave me net alone, 

To live forgotten, and die forlorn." 

b And, rising, from her bosom drew 
Old letters, breatjiing of her worth, 
For *'Love," they said, "must needs be ti-ue^ 

To what is loveliest upon earth." 
An image seemed to pass the door. 
To look at her with slight and say, 
**But now thy beauty fli^s away, 
So be alone f^roveitnore,^' 



Ba 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 125 

" O cruel heart," she changed her tone, 

•' And cruel love, whose end is scorn, 
Is this the end to be left alone, 

To live forgotten, and die forlorn." 

6 But sometimes in the falling day, 

An image seemed to pass the door, 
To look into her eyes and say, 

" But thou shalt be alone no more." 
And flaming downward over all 

From heat to heat the day decreased, 

And slowly rounded to the east 
The one black shadow from the wall. 
** The day to night," she made her moan, 

" The day to night, the night to morn, 
And day and night I am left alone, 

To live forgotten, and love forlorn." 

7 At eve a dry cicala sung. 

There came a sound as of the sea , 
Backward the lattice-blind she flung 

And leaned upon the balcony. 
There all in spaces rosy bright 

Large Hesper glittered on her tears, 

And deepening through the silent spheres, 
Heaven over heaven rose the night. 
And weeping then she made her moan, 

•' The night comes on that knows not morn, 
When I shall cease to be alone, 

To live forgotten, and love forlorn." 

Tennyson. 

THE DRUNKARD'S RESOLVE. 

Tune — ** Felicity.'' 



D !■ 1° I 1- 13 2 1 \ 1, II !■ 1, I 1- 132 



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Go, go, thou that enslaves t me, 

Now, now, thy power is o'er ; LoDg, long, have I obeyed 

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126 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



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thee, Now, I'll not drink any more ; No, no, no, no, 


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2 Thou, thou, bringest me ever 
Deep, deep sorrow and pain , 

Then, then, from thee 111 sever, 
Now, ril not serve thee again 
No, no, no, no, no, I'll not serve thee again. 

3 Rum, rum, thou hast bereft me, 
Home, friends, pleasures so sweet ; 

Now, now, forever, I've left thee, 
Thou and I never shall meet; 
No, no, no, no, no, thou and I never shall meet. 

4 Joys, joys, bright as the morning, 
Now, now, on me will pour, 

Hope, hope, sweetly is dawning; 

Now, I'll not drink any more ; 

No, no, no no, no, I'll not drink any more. 

ODE FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY, 

Tune — " StarSpang-Ied Banner." p. 163. 

1 On this joyous day, while the cannon's loud voice, 
From every green hill-top hke thunder is breaking; 

And music's soft strains upon ocean and shore. 

In each throbbing bosom fresh ardor is waking. 
There comes o'er the hills a discordant strain, 
Proclaiming, oppression exulteth again ; 
It fills every zephyr; is borne on each gale, 
Bespeaking the widows' and orphans' sad wail. 

2 'Rouse, freemen, arouse, for action prepare, 
Rush forth to retrieve your fond homes from invasion ; 

Your breasts as of yore, to the battle make bare ; 

But conquer by power of moral persuasion, 
W^itli manly resolve, let each one declare. 
The yoke of intemperance he never will bear ; 
Fling out the white flag, let it float in the gale, 
Till temperance all over the land shall prevail. 



;7g 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 127 

3 fc'se parents unite, and children combine, 

To wipe off the scourge that degrades our fair nation ; 
Their "lives, sacred honor, and fortunes," resign, 

To secure their country from base degradation. 
Devotion's pure streams incessantly rise, 
From woman's kind bosom, to God in the skies ; 
To lead on to conquest the hosts of the free, 
And save the " asylum of sweet liberty." 

4 Our cause still goes on, we'll be undismayed, 

The fountains of mis'ry will soon cease their flowing, 
While heaven directs us, we'll not be afraid, 

For cold water armies to millions are growing : 
In Israel's God we'll still put our trust, 
And boldly march onward; "our cause it is just;" 
Soon the white flag of temperance " in triumph shall wave, 
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave." 

OUR NATIVE COUNTRY. l. 

W. G. Pabodie. 



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The proud Pa - cif - ic chafes her strand, She hears the dark At - lantic roar ; 
In nature's wildest grandeur drest, Enamell'd with her loveliest dyes. 



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123 

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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



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2 Rich prairies, deck'd with flowers of gold, 

Like sunlit oceans roll afar; 
Broftd l^ikes her azure heavens behold, 

Reflecting clear each trembling star. 
And mighty rivers, mountain-born, 

Go sweeping onward dark and deep, 
Through forests where the bounding fawn 

Beneath their sheltering branches leap. 



5 5 



S And, cradled 'mid her clustering hills. 

Sweet vales in dream-like beauty hide, 
Where love the air with music fills. 

And calm content and peace abide; 
For plenty here her fullness pours, 

In rich profusion o 'er the land, 
And sent to seize her generous stores, 

There prowls no tyrant's hireling band. 

4 Great God ! we thank thee for this fiofae - 

This bounteous birth-land of the free; 
Where wanderers from afar may come. 

And breathe the air of liberty ! — 
Still may her flowers untrampled spring. 

Her harvests wave, her cities rise: 
And yet, till Time shall fold his win^^:, 

Bemain earth's loveliest paradise!" 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 129 

THE OLD HOUSE AT HOME. l. 



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EEP. 


111 


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3 3 2 


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child, at the 
in - fan - cy 

44 


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feet of 
lisp'd is 


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my 
the 


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mother I 
sol - ace of 


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knelt ; Oh 
age. 


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my heart 'mid all 


B 3 2 3 


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changes where'er I may roam, 

Can ne'er lose its lore for the old house at home. 


4o P /-N 


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2c579 995 99 99 9755 

9 9 9 9 



2 It is not for its splendor, that dwelling is dear, 
It is not that the wealthy and noble are there: 
Round the porch, the wild-rose and jasmine entwine, 
And the sweet-scented woodbine there waves in the wind; 
And my heart 'mid all changes wherever I roam, 
Shall ne'er lose its love for the old house at home. 



130 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

OUR HOMESTEAD, l. 

words ey miss phoebe gary. 

3p ^ 

A /-N I i 1 1 1 I 2 2 I 1- g 



2s"6-"7 6 7 9" 6- 7 T O 

Our old brown homestead reared its walls, From the wayside dust aloof, 



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9 99 9 99 99 

Where the apple houghs could almost cast, Their fruit - age on its roof ; 



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And the 


cherry 


trees so near it grew, That 


when awake 


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lain 


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In 

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the 


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lonesome nights, I've heard the limbs, As they creaked against the 


li 3 


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pane J And those orchard trees— Oh those orchard trees - 
3p p p p 

^ Ti i .. j-^-- ^ i I 

2a 6 6- s5 ^ .3 6. 6 7 7 5 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 131 



Sp 


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I'ye seen my 


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little brothers rocked, In their tops by the summer breeze. 


B 


3 3 1 4 3 


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6 6 7 7 9 7 6 s5 .6 

99 99 99 



The sweetbrier under the window sill. 

Which the early birds made glad, 
And the damask-rose by the garden fence, 

Were all the flowers we had. 
I've looked at many a flower since then, 

Exotics rich and rare, 
That in other eyes were lovelier, 

But not to me so fair; 
And those roses bright — Oh, those roses bright — 

I've twined them with my sijster's locks, 
That are lain in the dust from sight. 



3 We had a well — a deep old well, 

Where the spring was never dry, 
And the cool drops down from the mossy stones 

Were falling constantly ; 
And there never was water half so sweet 

As that in my little cup, 
Drawn from the curb, by the rude old sweep 

Which my father's hand set up ; 
And that deep old well — Oh, that deep old well ! ■— ■ 

I remember yet the plashing sound 
Of the bucket as it fell. 



Our homestead had an ample hearth, 

Where at night we loved to meet ; 
Where my mother's voice was always kind. 

And her smile was always sweet ; 
And there I've sat on my father's knee, 

And watched his thoughtful brow, 
With my childish hand in his raven hair — 

That hair is silver now ! 
But that broad hearth's light — O, that broad hearth's light! 

And my father's look, and my mother's smile, 
They are in my heart to-night. 



1^2 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

DO NOT DRINK AGAIN. 

|1Q 1* 1-12-1 

JA 5 | ^ 555{3555|6567| [J^ | ? ^>76| 

l2c 9 99 9 9 9 » 9 5 9 9 > 9 9 9 

0. do not drink again, papa, 0, do not drink again ! 

You know 'twill grieve my 



la 1 


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poor mamma, Then do not drink again. 0. come with me, my dear papa,, 



IG 2- 


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leaye your drink and come. For I haye told my poor mamma 

That I would bring you home. 

2 The people here are swearing so, 

I do not like to stay ; 
And poor mamma is sick, you know, 

Oh come with me, I pray ! 
I'm choking: with the smoke, papa, 

Oh, see those cruel men 
Are lighting! let us go, papa — 

I would not drink again. 

3 The house is cold at home, papa, 

And we have had no bread ; 
And little Charlie, too, papa; 

I fear is almost dead. 
Then do not drink again, papa, 

Oh, do not drink again ! 
You know 'twill grieve my poor manma, 

Oh, do not drink again. 

FREEDOM'S CALL. 

TVNE — '' Wallace/' p. 234. 

1 Friends of freedom ! swell the song, 
Young and old, the strain prolong, 
Make the temp'rance army strong-, 

And on to victory. 

2 Lift your banners, let them wave, 
Onward march a world to save : 
Who would fill a drunkard's grave, 

And hear his infnniv ? 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTEFi. 133 

3 Shrink not when the foe appears ; 
Spam the coward's guilty fears ; 
Hear the shrieks, behold the tears 

Of ruined families ! 

4 Raise the cry in every spot — 

" Touch not — Taste not — Handle not," 
Who would be a drunken sot, 
The worst of miseries ? 

5 Give the aching bosom rest, 
Carry joy to every breast; 

Make the wretched drunkard blett 
By living soberly. 

6 Raise the glorious watchword high — 
"Touch not — Taste not — lest you die !'' 
Let the echo reach the sky, 

And earth keep jubilee 

7 God of Mercy ! hear us plead ; 
For thy help we intercede, 
See, how many bosoms bleed, 

And heal them speedily, 

8 Hasten, Lord, the happy day, 
When, beneath thy genial ray; 
Temp'rance all the world shall sway, 

And reign triumphantly. 



SONG OF OLD TIME. l. 



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134 

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NATIONAL TEMFERAlSrCB SONGSTEK 




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lordly things 
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; But monarch and courtier 


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great they may be, Must 


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bend from their glory and bow to me, My scepter is 

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3 gemless ; yet who can say, They 


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will not 
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mighty sway ? Ye may know who I am, there's the 
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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 136 

2 Softly I creep, like a thief in the night, 
After cheeks all blooming and eyes all light, 
My steps are seen on the patriarch's brow. 
In the deep worn furrows and locks of snow. 
Who laughs at my power ? the young and the gay ; 
But they deem not how closely I track their way, 
^Vait till their first bright sands have run, 

And they will not smile at what Time hath done. 

3 I eat through treasures with moth and rust ; 
I lay the gorgeous palace in dust; 

I make the shell-proof tower my own, 
And break the battlement stone by stone. 
Work on at your cities and temples, proud man, 
Build high as ye may, and strong as ye can ; 
But the marble shall crumble, the pillar shall fall, 
And Time, old Time, will be king after all. 

Eliza Cook. 

THE CALL. 

TUxVE — "Christian Warfare." 



111|321112 2 /^ } 1- II 11 



23c 5 9 9 9 9 9 5 6 7 

9 9 9 9 

Come, join the gallant Temperance host. Ye young men boM and strong : 
And with a proud and cheerful zeal, Come, help the cause along : 

To $ REP. 



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And with a proud and cheerful zeal, Come, help the cause a - long. 

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2Sc5 535 5 35 5555 1- 



136 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



/a CH0KU8. 



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0, that will be joy - ful, joy - ful, joy 



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that mil be 


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i23c 5 535 533 5555 1« 



2 Come, join the brave, the noble Sons, 
Ye men of riper years, 
And save your vi^ives and children dear. 
From want and bitter tears : 
O, that will be joyful, joyful, joyful, 
O, that will be joyful, when strong men drink no more, 
When stroni^ men drink no more : 

'Tis then we'll sing, and offerings bring, 
When strong men drink no more. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTELl. 137 

3 Come, join the social temperance host, 

Ye men of hoary heads, 
And end your days where temperance 

Its peaceful influence sheds : 
O, that will be joyful, joyful, joyful ; 
O, that will be joyful, when old men drink no n.ore. 
When old men drink no more : 

'Tis then we'll sing, and offerings bring, 

When old men drink no more. 

4 Come, join the noble temperance host, 

Ye dames and maidens fair, 
And breathe around us, in our path, 

Affection's hallowed air: 
O, that will he joyful, joyful, joyful ; 
O, that will be joyful, when woman cheers US on, 
When woman cheers us on, to conquests not yot woii ; 

'Tis then we'll sing, and offerings bring, 

When woman cheers us on. 

5 Come, join the cheerful temperance host, 

Ye who distill and sell 
The poison that destroys the health 

And brings the fatal spell: 
O, that will be joyful, joyful, joyfal ; 

O, that will be joyful, when the still is worked no more ; 
When the still is worked no more, in ail our happy shore ; 

'Tis then we'll sing, and offerings bring, 

When the still is worked no more. 

6 Come, join the gallant temperance host, 

Ye sons and daughters, all, 
Of this our own America, 

Come, at the friendly call : 
O, that will be joyful, joyfnl, joyful ; 
O, that will be joyful, when all shall proudly say, 
When all shall proudly say, *' Away the bowl, away; '* 

'Tis then we 11 sing, and offerings bring, 

When all shall own our sway. 

THE TEMPERANCE ARMY. 

BY E. WILLIAMSON. 

1 We come, we come, in bright array. 

And in procession grand ; 
The good, the generous, and the great, 
Compose our countless band. 

2 Against King Alcohol we coma, 

Our banner we've unfurled, 
Ilesolved we are to drive the foQ 
Forever from our world. 



I3P NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

3 Upon its folds we have inscribed, 

Eternal bate to rum, 
And hope to march to victory, 
For this we come, we come. 

4 Unhappy wives, and drunkards sad. 

Whose hearts were filled with pain, 
With beaming eyes and buoyant hopes 
Now join our happy train. 

5 Delightful music cheers us on, 

It sweetly greets the ear, 
It falls from grateful cheerful lips, 
Attended by a tear. 

6 Upon our efforts angels smile, 

And gaze with sweet delight, 
Whilst in this cause we are engaged. 
Against the powers of night. 



THE SONG OF STEAM, l. 

Words Iv G. W. Cutter. 



2o 111 


11 1 


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You may harness me down with 
2a 1 


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your iron bands, And be sur« 


ofyour curb and 


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rein ; For I scorn the strength of your puny hands 

2g 1 


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As the tempest scorns a 
1 1 


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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER* 



139 



3a 111 


3 2 


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chain ; How I laugh'd as I 

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concealed from sight, For many 
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hour, At the 

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human might. 

And the pride of human power. 

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! Ha! hat ha! They found me at last; 

They invited me forth at length, 
And I rushed to my throne with a thunder-blast 

And laughed in my iron strength ! 
Oh ! then ye saw a wondrous change 

On the earth and ocean wide, 
"Where now my fiery armies range, 

Nor wait for wind or tide. 



3 Hurrah! hurrah! the waters o*er 

The mountains steep decline; 
Time — space — have yielded to my power - 

The world — the world is mine ! 
The rivers the sun hath earliest blest, 

And those where his beams decline ; 
The giant streams of the queenly We.nt, 

And the Orient floods divine. 



140 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

4: In the darksome depths of the fathomless mine 

My tireless'arm doth play, 
Where the rocks ne'er saw the sun's decline, 

Or the dawn of the glorious day. 
I bring earth's glittering jewels up 

From the hidden caves below, 
And I make the fountain's granite cup 

With a crystal gush o 'erflow ! 

., 5 I blow the bellows, I forge the steel, 

In all the shops of trade ; 
I hammer the ore, and turn the wheel, 

Where my arms of strength are made. 
I manage the furnace, the mill, the mint — - 

I carry, I spin, I weave ; 
And all my doings I put in print, 

On every Saturday eve. 

6 I 've no muscle to weary, no breast to decay, 

No bones to be " laid on the shelf," 
And soon I intend you may ^' go and play," 

While I manage the world by myself. 
But harness me down with your iron bands, 

Be sure of your curb and rein; 
For I scorn the strength of your puny hands, 

As the tempest scorns a chain ! 

WATER. A Temperance Song. 

Words by Eliza Cook. 



30 ^-^ 


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Wine, wine, thy power and praise Have ever been echoed in minstrel's lays : But 
3a 


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water, I deem hath a mightier claim, To fill up a niche in the temple of Fame. 

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NATIONAL 
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TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. Ml 
11 1 


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Ye who are bred in Anacreon 

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school, May sneer at my strain as the song of a fool : 

Ye are 


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no doubt, but have yet to learn 

How the tongue can cleave and the veins can burn. 
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Should you ever be one of a fainting band, 

With your brow to the sun, and your feet to the sand, 

I would wager the thing I'm most loth to spare, 

That your bacchanal chorus would never ring there. 

Traverse the desert, and then you can tell 

What treasuree exist in a deep cold well, 

Sink in despair on the red, parched earth, 

And then you may reckon what water is worth. 



3 Famine is laying her hand of bone 
On the ship becalm 'd in a torrid zone; 
The gnawing of hunger*s worm is past, 
But fiery thirst lives on to the last. 
The stoutest one of the gallant crew 
Hath a cheek and lips of ghastly hue ; — 
The hot blood sta^nds in each gloomy eye, 
And, " Water, God I" is the only cry. 



There 's drought in the land, and the herbage is dead, 
No ripple is heard in the streamlet's bed ; 
The herd's low bleat, and the sick man's pant, 
Are mournfully telling the boon we want. 
Let Heaven this one rich gift withhold, 
How soon we find it is better than gold; 
And water, I say, hath a right to claim, 
The minatrelV song and a glorious fame. 



!4g HAIL, COLUMBIA. National Aw 



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Columbia, 


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happy land ! 


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heroes, heaven-born band, Who 


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And 
fought and bled in free - dom's cause, Who fought and bled in freedom's cause. 



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when the storm of war was 
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, 9 Enjoyed 


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the peace your valor won 


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4(i 5 5555555 5 1 2255595 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. M^^ 



IS 










-- — - 


- — . 




















A 5- 


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In 

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be 


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your 


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Ever mindful what it cost ; 


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for 


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Let its 


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let us be, 


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144 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



A 4 


2 


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3 2 


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1 1 1- i .1 ii 


4q 6 6 '7 

As a band of 

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- ers joined; 


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Peace 


9 9 9 

and 


T 9 
safety we shall find. 


C 




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2 Immortal Patriots ! rise once more ! 
Defend your rights, defend your shore j 
Let no rude foe, with impious hand, 
Let no rude foe, with impious hand, 
Invade the shrine, where sacred lies, 

Of toil and blood, the well-earned prize; 
While offering peace, sincere and just, 
In heaven we place a manly trust, 
That truth and justice may prevail, 
And every scheme of bondage fail ! 
Chorus. — Firm, united let us be, <kc. 

3 Sound, sound the trump of fame ! 
Let Washington'' s great name 

Ring through the world with loud applause ! 
Ring through the world with loud applause ! 
Let every clime to freedom dear. 
Now listen with a joyful ear; 
With equal skill, with steady power, 
He governs in the fearful hour 
Of horrid war, or guides with ease 
The happier time of honest peace. 
Chorus. — Firm, united let us be, &c. 

4 Behold the chief, who now commands, 
Once more to serve his countr}^, stands, 
The rock on which the storm will beat! 
The rock on which the storm will beat! 
But armed In virtue, firm and true, 

His hopes are fixed on heaven and yauj 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 145 

When hope wa.s sinking in dismay, 
When gloom obscured Columbia's day, 
His steady mind from changes free, 
Resolved on death or Liberty. 

Chorus. — Firm, united let us be, &c. 



MEET ME IN HEAVEN. i» 

Ip 1 1121331 



A Ji 1 


6 


6 




6 


9 9 




1 ' 9 


6 1 


.5 !| 


3s 

A 
Ip 


9 9 

child lay 


on 


her 


lit - tie couch, 


her slight form rack'd with 


pain, 


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3 


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112 


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3s 

She 
If 


9 9 

tried to smile and 


pleasant be, 


but 


tried and tried in 


vain; 


C 3 1 


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3 


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s5 


1 6 6 


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^' Moth 
Ip 


- er, 


my 


lips 
1 


are 


hot," she said 
112 


, " give me the 
2 11 


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drink, 


C s5 


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6 




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And come and sit be - side me, ere to slumber's chains I sink. 
1p 



3 13 3 5 3 15 5 5 s5 1 6 6 5 5 I .3 M 



SS 9 9 9 9 9 9 

2 "And try to keep me Vake, for now my strength is almost gone, 
I am so worn and restless, when my burning fever's on. 
And lay your gentle hand upon my hot and throbbing brow; 
Ah ! that is sweet, mother ! — and I am better — better now. 
10 



146 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

3 ^* You aro so good and beautiful ! — all ! mother, I half-long 
To linger in this happy world, although I know it's wrong; 
You say I must not murmur, and you say that it is best. 
Ah ( mother, will you miss me, when I am gone unto my rest ? 



4 "You must not let them breathe my name, I know 'twill make you weep 
To think how coldly in the grave, all by myself I sleep ; 
You'll miss me, too, around the hearth at close of winter's ev'n. 
You must not, must not weep, but think I 'm waiting you in heaven. 

6 " And when they close my eyes, and fold my hands so white and stiii, 
You '11 come and sit beside me then ? — ah ! yes, I know you will, 
And place within m}^- fingers, too, the roses sweet and pale. 
They 're growing wild beside the rill, far down this happy vale. 



6^1 feel your tears upon my hand — don 't weep — don 't weep for me, 
You 'vo told me in that far-oft' home how happy I should be, 
And yon must think of this, and take my Bible from the shelf. 
And read those words I learned to say — you taught me them yourself. 



7 " And let the violets, purple, on my grave in summer grow, 
They look so sweet and modest, and I always loved them so ; 
But you must not think that I am there — my spirit free will rise, 
And ever watch the coming of your own sweet ^ saint-like eyes.' 



8 '' I feel you're weeping, mother, and you must not, must not weep, 
But try, as you have taught me oft, a trusting heart to keep : 
You see you have not taught in vain, my years are only seven, 
And yet I feel I 'm old enough to look for you in heaven. 



9 " 'T is turning darker, darker now — you say 't is morn without, 
Jusi mid-day, and the sun is bright, the wild birds all about; 
I can not see a ray of light — how quick and short my breath, 
Oh, tell me, mother, tell me ! do you think that this is death ? 



10 "I can not bear these shadows o'er my closing eyelids cast, 
I want to have my sight, and see your sweet face to the last; 
I tried to hush my murmuring, oh, how long and hard I've striven, 
And now I'm free ! oh, mother dear, meet me, meet me, in heaven." 

Melodia. 



THE TEMPERANCE SHIP. 147 



IQ 1- 
























.1- 3 


A 


R 


5- 


6 


5 


4 


3 


5 


6 


5 


6 


T 


1 


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Speed 
lo 1- 


9 

> 


speed 


9 

the 


temp 'ranee 


ship, 


Ye winds fill 


ev 


- 'ry sail ; 


G 


R 


5- 


6 


5 


4 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


2 


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lo 1- 


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9 








1 


1 


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1 


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5- 


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lo 1- 


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9 





















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Behold 


her sail 


- ing 


9 

on 


the 


deep. 


Out 


■rid 


- ing 


ev 


- 'ry gale; 


G 


5- 


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7 6 5 11 


4q 9 9 
The tempest's 
lo ^-^ 


9 9 

fury 


she outbraves. And hosts of deathless he 


9 9 

• ings saves. 


G 3 3 


4 3 


4 5 


1 3 3 


3 


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3 2 II 


4q 

lo t 


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1 


9 9 
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5 



148 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

IG 12 3 2 ^1 fs ,4^4- 3 'Ts 2^ 1- 1- :1 



A 5 1 IT' 


9 .; 


j ( 9 9 9 9 9 »y 


9 6 1.5 •?! 11 


4q 9 
The tempest's fury she 


out 


9 9 

- braves. And hosts of deathless beings saves. 


3 13453134 


5 


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4 1 ,3 .2 |:3il 


4ii 9 > 

IG 


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2 Speed, speed the temperance ship ! 
Who joined us in the cry? 
Mothers and children cease to weep, 

Our ship is passing by : 
We wish to take you all on board, 
A freight of mercy to the Lord. 



3 Speed, speed the temperance ship ! 

For her we 11 ever pray; 
'T is Israel's God alone can keep 

In safety, night and day : 
On him we 11 evermore depend. 
Who is the contrite sinner's friend. 



4 Speed, speed the temperance ship ! 

Ye young and aged shout; 

Behold her sailing o'er the deep, 

With all her streamers out. 
Bound for the true tee-total shore, 
Where itreams of death are known no more. 



1 Praise to the Lord on high. 

Who spreads his triumphs wide, 
While temp 'ranee (ever blessed cause) 

Is urged on every side : 
Balmy and rich its odors rise, 
To fill eaeh realm bsneath the skies. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSIER. 149 

2 Ten thousand dying men 

Its influence feel, and live ; 
Sweet as the purest atmosphere, 

The incense they receive : 
They breathe anew — to God they bring 
Their thanks thro' Christ, their conq'ring king. 



3 Let all receive the grace, 

Which brings such blessings nigh; 
Nor one reject, lest, in disgrace, 

He faint, and fall, and die : 
Ye temperance men, their doom deplore. 
For, 0, they fall to rise no more. 

4 0, may I e 'er be kept 

From wine's destructive bowl; 
That wily foe, which seeks to kill 

My body and my soul : 
Savior, with aid divine, anew, 
I bid its touch a last adieu. 



WEEP NOT FOR HIM THAT DIETH. 

S. W. Leonard, 

"Weep not for him that dieth, neither bemoan him ; but weep sore for him that 
goeth away, for he shall return no more, nor see his native country." Jer. xxii : 10, 



4o 


x-^ 




^-^ 
















^^ 




^-^ 




A 


3- 4 1 


.5 


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3s 

4g 


9 99 

" Weep 


not 


9 99 

for him that 


9 

dieth, 


9 99 

' For he 

ft* 


9 99 

sleeps and 


is 


9 99 

at 


rest, 


B 


1 i 


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1 I 


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1 


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31 


.4 


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3s 9 99 9 99 

And the couch where 
4g 


-on 


9 

he lieth. 


9 99 9 99 

Is the green earth's 


9 
qui 


9 9 » 

- et breast. 


B 


1- 


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,38 


9 


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9 




5- 


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5 





150 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 

|4g ^^ .1 ,-. .1 1 ^^ ^^ 



A 5- 1 i 6- T 


i \t 6" \ 


I 5 5 1 6- 5 S4: 5 


•6 s4 1 .5 li 


8s 9 " 9 99 

But weep for 
4o 


9 

him who pinethj 


9 9 9 9 9 

On a far land's 


hateful shoK,- 


B 1 1 .3 4 


1 .5 1 1 i 


1111-1 1 


1 .1 2 1 11 


5s 


5 5- 


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^^^ 












y-^s 


^^ 


/^^ ^~ 


^ 


A 3- 4 1 


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3- 4 1 


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5 ! 3 


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3 ( 4-2 


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2 1. Hi 


3s 9 99 

Who 
4q 


9 99 

wear - i - 


ly 


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9 

• clineth 


9 99 9 

Where you see 


9 99 

his 


9 9 

face no 


9 9 

more. 


B 1 1 


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1 1 


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3 


1 1 


1-^ 


II 


1 






i.iii 



" Weep not for him that dieth/^ 

For friends are round his bed, 
And many a young lip sigheth, 

When they name the early dead ; 
But weep for him that liveth, 

Where none may know or care, 
When the sigh his faint heart giveth, 

Is the last sigh of despair. 



^^ Weep not for him that dieth," 

For his struggling soul is free, 
And the world from which it flieth, 

Is a world of misery ; 
But weep for him that weareth, 

The captive's galling chain ; 
To the agony he beareth, 

Death were but little pain. 



"Weep not for him that-dieth," 

For he hath ceased from tears, ■ 
And a voice to his replieth, 

Which he hath not heard for years | 
But weep for him that weepeth, 

On that cold land's cruel shore — 
Blest, blest is he who sleepeth,, 

Weep fbt" the dead no more. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 151 

ZI I^. Hastings. 



2<3 1- 1 


1 111 








D 9 99 


! 5 5- 99 1 


5- 5 


10 6 5 5 


• 5 li 


3c 
2g $ 


9 


> 99 


9 9 


REP. 


C 3- 3 


3 13-3143 


5- 5 


14 4 3 2 1 


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3c 9 99 

From the 

2g 


9 99 

mountain top and Talley, 


9 99 

See the 
1- 1 


9 9 

banner streaming 
3 2 1 


high, 
.1 


A 5- 5 


5 3 9 5 1 6 5 


9 99 


1 ' ' 7 1 


I( 


3c 9 99 

While the 
2g $ 


99 

Sons of Temp'rance rally 


, To the 


■wido-sv's lonely 


cry. 

REP. 


li 1- 1 


l 1 1- 1 ! 4 1 


3- 3 


14 4 5 1 


.1 1 


3c 9 99 


9 99 


9 99 


9 9 5 





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9 


99 






9 


99 


9 


99 




7 






2g 


$ 






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REP. 




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4 


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9 


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9 


99 












Sis - 


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weep - 


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Bid 


U3 


to 


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9 


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? 


99 




5 







2 Conld we hear the mothers pleading. 

Heaven relief would quickly send, 
Can we see our country bleeding, 
Still refuse our aid to lend ? 

No, dread monster, 
Here thy triumph soon shall end. 

3 Hear the trump of Temp'rance sounding 

Rouse ye, freemen, why delay 'i 
Let your voices, all resounding, 
Welcome in the liappy day, 

When the tyrant 
Must resign his cruel sway. 



152 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



4 Nor shall he again molest us, 

Though he has oppressed us sore; 
Nor his poisonous breath infest us : 
Soon we'll drive him from our shore. 

All uniting, 
Shout " the monster's reign is o'er." 



THE BRIDE'S FAREWELL. 



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Yet there's sadness on thy brow. 
Winning me from that beguiling 

Tenderness to which 1 go ; 
Farewell, father, thou didst bless f<5q, 

Ere my lips thy name could telJ, 
He may wound, who can caress rr.e, 

Father, guardian, fare thee well. 

3 Farewell, sister, thou art twining 

Round me in affection deep, 
Wishing joy, but ne'er divining, 

Why " a blessed bride " should n i'>.> 
Farewell, brave and gentle brother. 

Though more dear than words c»v t'i i 
Father, mother, sister, brother, 

All beloved ones, fare ye well. 



ARE THERE TIDINGS. 163 



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'•j<i ^-^ ^.i^ ,— V Soft. ^-^ 



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2 Do not ask me why I hasten 
To each vessel that appears ; 
Why so anxious and so wildly 

I wait the cherished hope of years. 
No, no, no; 
Though my search prove unavailing, 
What have I to do with tears, 
What have I to do with tears. 



Do not blame me when I seek him 
With these worn and weary eyes; 

Can you tell me v/here he perished? 
Can you show me where he lies ? 
No, no, no ; 

Yet there surely is some record 
When a youthful sailor dies, 
When a youthful sailor dies. 



4 Had I watched him by his pillow, 
Had I seen him on his bier ; 
Had my grief been drowned in wecpirsg 
But I can not shed a tear. 
No, no, no ; 
Let me still think I shall see hirr >— 
Let me still think ho is near. 
Let mo still think ho is near. 



2o 



2JATI0NAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 155 

COME, COME AWAY. 

Tune — " Fourth of July J' 



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166 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 When sparkleth the wine, 
When reddeneth the color, 
Then lift not up the fatal cup, 

But turn, turn away. 
Look not upon it then, forsooth, 
It biteth like a serpent's tooth, 
Old age and blooming youth, 

O, come, come away. 

3 When sweet Temperance, 
AVife, husband, children blessing, 
With evening songs her notes prolongs, 

O, come, come away. 
For surer far is he to cure 
His ill, where drink is water pure, 
And life's toil well endure, 

Then, come, come away. 

4 Away to the polls, 

Old men and young advancing, 

With nerves of steel, and hearts that feel, 

O, come, come away ; 
Like freemen take a noble stand, 
A true and faithful temperance band, 
And vote Rum from the land, 

O come, come away. 

ODE FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY, 1846. 

Dedicated to the Morning Star Division, No. 6G, Sons of J'emperancet 

By R. M. Foust. 

Air — '' The Star Spangled Banner^ p. 103. 

1 Hail Liberty's birth-day ! approaching in light, 

Which soon will in beauty and splendor be gleaming ; 
Wiih banners and emblems of Temperance bright, 

And Pledge to the breeze all gloriously streaming, 
We come to your stars, and stripes red, white and blue, 

To Purity, Love, and Fidelity true ; 
And plant our proud banner beside it to wave, 

'• O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave." 

2 What are those who in thousands with badges of white, 

Come proclaiming to drunkards there's mercy still flowing ? 
Who are routing intemperance with o'erwhelming might. 

And the blessings of health in their pathway strewing ? 
Whose souls beat with ardor, whose arms nerved in truth, 

Bring days to the aged, and years to the youth 1 
'Tis the true Sons of Temperance, may their banner e'er wave 

'* O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.'* 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 167 

3 Yes, the TemperaDce banner of might rear on high ; 

Be the north, and the South, and the East and West claimed; 
Be our land for e'er free, free as clouds o'er the sky, 

Intemperance crushed, and his foul spirit tamed ! 
Be the orphan's wail hushed, the widow's tear dried, 

Be crime and want banished our land far and wide , 
By our proudly pledged banner, which floats but to save 

" The land of the free, and the home of the brave." 

4 Rouse, rouse ye, then, freemen, join this noble band. 

Aid to wipe out the stain which intemperance is making, 
Rouse up in your strength, and rescue our land 

From the demon whose blows its firm pillars are shaking. 
Come on, grasp the pledge, your manhood renew. 

Gather arourud our proud banner, with the red, white and blue, 
Then will liberty smile, you her nation will save, 

Blessed "land of the free, and home of the brave." 



MY MOTHER'S BIBLE. 



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This book is all that's left me now ! Tears -will uu - bidden 

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158 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



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All ! well do I remember those, 

Whose names these records bear; 
Who round the hearthstone used to ciosa 

After the evening prayer, 
And speak of what these pages said, 

In tones my heart would thrill ! 
Though they are with the silent dead, 

Here are they living still. 



3 My father read this holy book, 

To brothers, sisters, dear ; 
How calm was my poor mother's look. 

Who lean 'd God's word to hear. 
Her angel-face — I see it yet ? 

What thronging memories come ! 
Again that little group is met 

Within the halls of home. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. ^ o9 

4 Thou truest friend man ever Knew, 
Thy constancy I've tried; 
Where all were false, I found thee true,^ 

My counselor and guide. . 
The mines of earth no trsasures give 

That could this volume buy ; 
In teaching me the way to live, 

It taught me how to die. ^ -.^ ,^ 

^ Gen. G. p. Morris. 



THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER. Irish Melody. 

Expressively. ^ ^^^ rep. 'Id. timr. 

a 1 ^— V 



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'Tis the last rosti of summer, left bloom- jng a - Ion.., 

All her lovely com - panions are fad - ed apd gone, 

To reflect back her blushes, or give sigh Tor Bi„n. 



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160 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 I ^il not leave tliee, thou lone one, to pine on the stem, 
Since the lovely are sleeping, go ! sleep thou with them 
Thus kindly I scatter thy leaves o ^er the bed, 
Where thy mates of the garden lie scentless and dead. 



3 So soon may I follow, when friendships decay, 
And from love's shining circle, the gems drop away ! 
When true hearts lie withered, and fond ones are flowit. 
Oh ! who could inhabit this bleak world alone ? 



WILL YOU COME TO THE GROVE. 



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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 161 



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9 


9 




B 






I 1 


R 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 








1 1 II 



2q 



2 Will you come to the place, where the evergreens grow, 
Whose leaves drink the dew, and decay never know ? 
Will you, will you, will you, will you come to the place, 
Will you, will you come to the place ? 



3 We will sportively chat, and will merrily sing. 

While we drink of the water that flows from the spring ; 
Will you, will you, will you, will you come to the spring ? 
Will you, will you come to the spring ? 



THE CARRIER-DOVE. 



A 1 2 


3- 


2 3 


4 3 13 2 1 1 


1- 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


23c 99 99 

Fly a - 

7g 


9 

way 


99 9 

to my 


9 9 5 5 

99 99 

native land, sweet dove, Fly a 


9 

•way 


99 

to 


9 

my 


9 7 

9 

na - 


9 

tive 


C 


1 1- 


1 


2 111 1 








..-v 


1 


230 3 3 

99 99 

7g 


9 


7 ' 

99 


9 5 3 3 3 

9 99 99 


3- 

9 


3 

99 


3 

9 


3 5 

9 9 


6 

9 


B 1 1 


1 1- 


1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1- 


1 


1 




1 



23c 99 99 

11 



i62 l^^ATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



4. 2« 


R 


1 2 13-2 


3 4 3 3 13 2 


112 13-21 


2 3 2 1 


2:ic 
laud, 

7g 




99 99 9 99 9 99 99 9 

And bear these lines to my lady-love, 


99 99 9 99 9 

That I've traced with 


9 9 9 

a fee - hie 


C 


R 




1 1» 


12 1111 


1 1-= 


1 


23c T- 
7g 




3 5 

99 99 


9 T 
99 


9 99 99 5 
9 


3 3 5 9 T 6 

99 99 99 9 


5 4 

9 


B 


R 




1 


1 


1 


\ 


23c 3" 

7g 




1 1 
9? 99 


1» 1 
9 9? 


1111 11 

9 99 99 9 


111 5-55 

99 99 9 99 9 


5 5 

9 


A 1- 


R 


11 


^-^ 


1 -- 


1^11- 1 


2 1 1 


23c 

hand, 

7g 




5 

9 

She 


6-55 5-6556T 55 ^ 79990 

9 ?9 9 9 99 9 9 9 9 99 99 99 9 

marvels much at my long de - lay, A rumor of death she has 


C 


R 


II 


,^ 


1 ---s 


^-^ 1 


1 



23g3- 3 4-333-43345633 3-23564 

9 9 99 99 99 9 999 99 99 9 99 9999 

76 



1- 1 1-111-115551111-23222 

9 9 99 99 99 9 999 99 99 9 99 9999 



7g ^^ 


^-^ 


A R12| 3- 234 3 3132111 5- 31 


5- 1 1- R|l 


23c 5- 99 99 9 99 9 99 99 9 9 9 99 9 5 9 ^ 

9 9 

heard, Or she thinks, perhaps, I falsely stray. Then fly to her bower, sweet bird. 
7g ^-^ 


C R 11- 121111 13-1 


1 R|| 


23c 3- 3 5 9 T 9 99 99 5 3 3 9 99 6 5 

99 99 99 9 9 9 9 

7a 


3 3- 


B Rllll-lll,^i 111- 


1 Ril 


230 5- 99 95 9 99 9 3 3 5 5 19 9 5 3 2 


5 1- 



2 ! flj to her bower and say, the chain 

Of the tyrant is on me now ; 
That I never shall mount my steed again. 

With helmet on my brow ; 
No friend to my lattice a solace brings, 

Except when your voice is heard ; 
When you beat the bars with your snowy wings. 

Then fly to her bower, sweet bird. 



NATIOKAL TEMPERAKCE SONGSTER. 163 

8 I shall miss tliy visit at dawn, swe^t dove, 

I shall miss thy visit at eve ; 
But bring me a line from my lady-love, 

And then I shall cease to grieve ; 
I can bear in a dungeon to vraste away youth, 

I can fall by the conqueror's sword, 
But I can not endure she should doubt my truth, 

Then fly to her bower, sweet bird. 

THE SPIRIT-BIRD. 

1 Fly away to the promised land, sweet dove, 

My away to the promised land, 
And bear these sighs to the friends I love. 

The happy, the beautiful band. 
Deep gloom hath saddened my weary breast. 

With sorrow my heart is stirred, 
I long to hear from the land of the blest; 

! fly to their bowers, sweet bird ! 

2 ! fly to their bowers sweet dove, and say 

The light of hope's on me now; 
I long to list to a Seraph's lay. 

With bright glory upon my brow ; 
I feel that this world is not my home, 

An angel's sweet voice I have heard. 
It comes from beyond the dark, lone tomb — 

! fly to their bowers, sweet bird ! 

3 I will wait thy coming at dawn, sweet dove, 

I will vfait thy coming at eve ; 
But bear some news from the friends I love, 

And then I will cease to grieve ; 
I could spring from this prison on wings of love, 

I could fall by death's conquering sword ; 
But I can not stay from my friends above, 

! fly to their bowers, sweet bird ! J. N. Maffit. 

THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER. 



Ic 


Bold, Energetic. 


.13 2 1 


^,^^ 


A 


111 3 51 


' 9 1 3 4- 


1 .5 5 5 1 


3Q 

la 


0! say can you 
Whose stripes and bright 


sce from the dawn's ear - ly 
stars thro' the per - il - ous 
.1 .-V 1 


light, What so 
flight, 'er the 


B 


111 3 51 


5 5 1112 


.5 5 5 I 


3q 




9 t 


9 » 



164 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

iG 3» 2 1 11 



A 


9 




i T- 


6 


T 


5 1 


3 11! 


3q 
IG 


proud - ly 
ram - parts 


we 

we 


hailed, 
watched, 


9 

at 
were. 


the 
so 


twi - light's last 
gal - lant - ly 


gleaming ; 
streaming : 


B 


1- 1 


1 


1 5» 


5 


5 


13 5 1 


1 1 il 



3q 



iG 



3q 



.4 4 4 



A 


9 9 




1 


9 9 1 






9 9 1 


3q 
IG 


And the 
1 1 


rock 
1 


■ et's red glare, 
1 1 ,1 


the bombs bursting 


in 


air, 


Gave 


B 


9 ' 




1 


5 5(53 


5 


.4 


6 T 



IG 


3- 


2 


1 








1 








A 




9 




T= 


& 


T 




3 


s4 


o5 11 


3q 
iG 


proof 
1- 


thro' 


the 


night 


9 
that 


our 


flag 
1 


was 


still 


there. 


B 




5 


1 


5- 


5 


5 




1 


2 


1 .5 1) 


3q 




9 






9 













Chorus. 

IG 1 


1 


1 






2 3 


4^3 


2 1 


l-^ 




A 5 1 






6 


6 6 1 


9 9 


9 9 


9 9 


1 T 


5 5 1 


3q 

0! say, 

IG 


does that star - 


spangled 


ban 


- ner 


still 


wave. 


9 9 
'er the 


C 5 ,-1^,5 


5 


5 


4 


4 4 1 


4 


6 5 


4 


3 2 


5 5 • 


3(i 

IG 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


2 


9 9 






9 9 


D T 1 








1 




6 


6 


.5 


•7 '2' , 


3q 
IG 








^ 




_ 






9 9 


B 5 1 3 


3 


3 


4 


4 4 3 1 


2 


2 3 


4 


1 c5 


5 5 : 


3(i 








9 9 




9 9 






9 9 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 165 



[lo 1« 


2 


3 4 


• 5" 


5 


3 


1 


3» 


4 


2 


.1 


A 


9 


9 9 


1 








1 


9 




! 1 


3q 
land 


of 


the 


free 




and 


tlie 


home 


Of 


the 


brave I 






5- 


5 


5 


.5- 1 


5 


5 


3 


1 3- 


5 


4 


1 .3 11 


3q 

IG 1- 


f 


I'^S 






1 


1 


1- 


9 

2 






.3- 


3 


• 1 


D 


7 


' 9 


1 








1 


9 


T 


1 M 


3q 

iG 


? 


1 


.1- 


1 


1 


1 










B 3- 


5 




I 








r 5- 


5 


3 


.1 11 


3ci 


9 














9 







2 On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, 
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes ; 
What is that, which the breeze o 'er the towering steep, 

As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses ; 
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, 
In full glory reflected, now shines in the stream. 

Chorus. — 'Tis the star-spangled banner, long may it wave, &o. 



3 ! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand. 

Between their lov'd home, and the war's desolation. 

Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n rescued land. 
Praise the Pow'r that has made and preserv'd us a nation, 

Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just. 

And this be our motto — "In God be our trust! " 

Chorus. — And the star-spangled banner, in triumph shall wave, (fee. 



THE SEA! Neukomm. 

3^3 1 2- 1" 



A 


5 1 


9 R 5 1 


9 R 9 1 


5- 


1 


K 5 1 T 6 1 


230 
IG 


9 

The 


9 9 

sea I the 

.-V 1 


9 

sea! the o - 
1^1 


pen 


sea! 


9 9 » 

The blue, the freah, th« 


B 


1 i 


1- 1 R M 


9 R 1 ! 5- 


5- 


1- 


R 5 1 5 5 1 2 i 



166 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



la 






2 1 


,^-v 




A 


T 5 6 s4 


5 T 


9 9 6 15 5 5 6 


1 T T T e 


T 1 


23g 

iG 


9 9 

ev - er free ! the 


9 

ever, 


9 9 9 

ev - er free ! Without a 


9 9 9 

mark, without 


9 

a 


B 


5 5 2 2 


5 5 


2 2 1 5 R= R 


1 cR" 


1 


23o 


9 9 


9 


9 9 







flG 111 



A 9 9 6 


S4 


s2 2 3 ST* 5 


S4- R T 


1 7- T 6. T 1 


23g 9 9 9 9, ' 9 9 

bound, It runneth the earth's wide re - gions 

iG 


9 

round. It 


9 9* 

plays with the 


B ,Ro 




1 .R- 


1 R« R 5 


1 5= 5 5 5 1 


23c 






9 


9 9 5 


'iG 2- 2 1— 


1-12 1 


^v- 



A 


9 


9 1 


9 9 9 


1 T- R 5 


5 s4 


3 


s2 2 i 


230 

iG 


clouds, 


9 

it 


mocks the 


9 

skies, Or, 


9 9 

like 


9 

a 


9 

cradled 






B 


5- 5 


5 5 


2» 2 2 


1 5- R 5 


5 s4 


3 


p2 2 ' 


230 


9 


9 9 


9 


9 


9 9- 


9 


9 



IG 


,^-v 


Is 




^^ 




1-11 


A 


3 2 1 


T i 9 T 


6 


5 4 3 1 6» 7- 


1 3- R- 


1 ' i 


230 

iG 


9 9 9 

creature. 


T 9 9 

lies; Or, like 
1—. 


9 

a 


9 9 9 

cradled creature, 


lies. 


I'm on the 


B 


3 2 1 


T 1 9 t 


6 


5 4 3 1 6- t-" 


1 3= R- 


11- 1 11 


23c 


9 9 9 


T 9 9 


9 


9 9 9 




9 



IG 


1- 








I 1 1— ^ 


A 


Rn 


15-551 


5- R 


5 


1 9 976153345! 


230 

iG 


sea! 


9 

I'm on the 


sea! 


9 
I 


9 9 9 9 9 9 

am where I would ever be. With the 


B 


1- K« 


15-55 


5- R 


1 


111 1 Ijllllll 


23c 




9 




9 


9 9 9 9 9 9 



1G 


1- 


.-—-V 


^^^ 


A 6 6 6 


5 4 13 115 1 T- 


1 6- T 6 1 S3- 


s4 5 i 


23c 9 9 
blue above, 

iG 


9 9 9 9 

and the blue below, And si - lence 


9 

reigns where 'er 


9 
I 


B 111 


11111111 3- 


14-2213- 


3 3 1 



6- 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 167 



IG 






^ 1» 1 1 


2-2123- 1 


A 6- 


R 6 


5 


5« 5 6 T 1 9 T ' 1 


9 9 9 ( R 9 , 


23c 
go. 


99 
If 


99 

a 


9 9 9 9 

storm should come and 


wake the deep, What 
^ 1- 


s 


R 1 


1 1 


1-1 1 1 1» 1 2 1 I 


5-5 5 1 R 1 1 



23c 6- 



IG 


2 


2 


3 1 


1^1 


2 3 4 _-^ 


1- 1 


A 


9 5 


R- 9 1 


9 9 R- 


99 99 


9 9 5 5 6 T 


^— ' 11 


23c 
IG 


9 

matter ? 


what 


matte r ? 


for 


9 9 9 

I shall on - ]y 


sleep. 


B 


5 5 


R- 5 1 


1 1 R- 


1 1 


4 4 5 5 


1- 1 ii 


230 


9 9 


9 


9 9 


99 99 


9 9 





I love - - hovr I love to ride, 
On the fierce, foaming, bursting tide. 
When every mad wave drowns the moon. 
Or whistles aloft his tempest tune, 
And tells how goeth the world below, 
And why the south-west blast doth blow. 
I never was on the dull tame shore, 
But I lov 'd the great sea more and more, 
And backward flew to her billowj^ breast. 
Like a bird that seeketh its mother's nest; 
And a mother she was and is to me, 
For I was born on the open sea. 



3 The waves were white, and red the morn, 
In the noisy hour when I was born; 
And the whale, it whistled, the porpoise roll 'd, 
And the dolphins bared their backs of gold ; 
And never was heard such an out-cry wild 
As welcomed to life the ocean child. 
I have livM, since then, in calm and strife, 
Full fifty summers a rover's life, 
With wealth to spend, and a power to range; i 
But never have sought or sighed for change ; 
And death whenever ho comes to me, 
Shall como on the wide, imbounded sea. 



168 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



4g 
A 1 


OLD HODGE. 
1 1 


I 5 5 5 1 1 6 6 1 7 6 5 5 1 6 s4 5 li 


3g 
Old 

4q 


9 9 f > 9 9 9 9 

Ilodge one night, at Carlo's bar, Had got, in classic parlance, <' tight," 


B 1 


|llia|4<i44|3311|32 || 


3c 


9 > 9 9 9 9 9 9 5 



4o 



A 5 I 3 3 3 5 



4223 I 3s4 55 | 6 7 



When, as he homeward made his tracks, He heard the '• Voices of the Night." 



I 



I 



11 I 4 2 1 



i3c 5 



'4g 



A6|5 551|ll.l| 


.5 3 


.3 3 1 .1- II 


3c 9 9 9 9 

" Old Hodge got drunk ! Old Hodge got drunk I 
4« 


Drunk, 


drunk, drunk!-' 


B 1 i 1 1 1 .11 


.1 3 1 


1 .1- II 


3o 9 9 5 5 5 5 




.5 S 



2 As with a quite uncertain step, 

Unto a mill pond's brink he came, 
Where old king Bullfrog held liis court, 
He thought he heard one call his name : 

3 " Old Hodge, old Hodge ! " he stopped and gazed, 

Till goblins seemed to fill the dark; 
And Hodge, though brave, was rather scared, 
•' What's that? " he said. " what's that 1 O hark ! ' 
"Old Hodge got drunk! 
Old Hodge got drunk I 
Drunk, drunk, drunk! " 

4 " You lie, you lie ! " said Hodge, '*i/ou lie ! " 

A deep voice answered, " Never more ! " 
And Hodge thought Nick himself was near, 
Among the bushes on the shore. 

5 So thinking it was best to run. 

He started like a railroad car; 
I But horrid shapes now thronged his path, 
And voices shouted near and far. 

" Old Hodge got drunk ! 
Old Hodge got drunk ! 
Drunk, drank, drunk 1 " 



I WEEP, I MOURN, I PRAY. l. 169 

IIP 



A 


1- 


3 


3 


5 3 


3 12 113 3 5 


3 


I G^ II 


23s 
I? 


Oh, 


Je 


9 

sus, 


9 
I have 


9 9 9 

come to thee, My wanderings to 


9 

de 


- plorc; 


n 


1- 






1 


1 1 




1 W 



23s 66 6 555566 



Ip 












p 










A 1- 


13 3 


5 


3 


1 3 


1 


2 6 


3 


2 


1 


1 11 


23!, 

Wilt 
Ip 


9 

thou not 


set 


9 

my 


spir ■ 


9 
it 


9 

free? My 


fall 


9 

en 


9 

soul re 


6- 

• store? 


B 1- 


1 


1 










1 






1 (1 


23s 


6 6 




6 


5 


5 


5 6 




T 


6 S5 


6- 



Ip 






















A 




1 1 


1 


2 3 


1 5- 


6- 


3 


3 


1 


ll 


23s 
Ip 


6- 

I 


weep, 


9 
I 


9 

mourn, I 


pray, 


Oh, 


Je ■ 


9 

sus, 


9 

now for 


6- 

give. 


B 




I 






1 1- 


3- 


1 1 


1 




II 


23s 


6- 


5 


5 


5 5 








9 


6 s5 


6- 



2 My sins are more than I can bear, 

Oh. speak them all forgiven : 
My soul away from earth I tear, 
To seek a place in heaven. 
Chorus. — I weep, I mourn, I pray, <xc. 

3 Pity, Lord, my helpless grief; 

My soul's deep anguish see : 
And grant me now that sweet relief, 
"Which none can give but thee. 
Chorus. — I weep, I mourn, I pray, <%c, 

4 Didst thou not die, that I might live, 

Might live thy love to know ; 
Oh, let me now thy love receive, 
And in thy favor grow. 
Chorus. — I weep, I mourn, I pray, <tc. 



170 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

SUMMER MORN. , 

WORDS BY S. W. L. 



5 5 



I 3 5 5 5 I 



5 6 7 



The streamlet on the mountain side, how sweet its gushing spring. 



1- 1 



I 3 3 



[iG 


1 3- 


1 






1 


3- 1 






A 


9 1 9 


99 


7 6 


15 6 7 


' 1 


9 rj 7 e 


1 5- 


II 


2g 
lo 


Around 


it 


9 9 

sail gay 


9 9 9 

butterflies, 


of 


9 9 

every hue and 


wing ; 




B 


1 1 5- 


5 


5 4 


3 1 


1 


5-531 


1 


1! 


2c 


9 9 


99 


9 9 


9 > 5 


9 


9 99 9 9 


5- 





IG 



111 



1 3" 3 1 



3- 1 



A 5 I 



I '' 



99 7 



2c 9 
There 

iG 



honey-bees and humming-birds, their solos sweetly sing. 



ji 



I 5-535 



5 5-. 5 5 I 



5 5 5 



2c 9 



iG 


3 


3- 


3 3 3 


4: 


3 


1-111 


1 


A 


9 


1 ' 


99 9 9 


9 


9 7 5 


1 9 99 9 » 1 




2g 

iG 


Ac 


- com 


- panied by 


ti- 


9 9 

ny waves so 


Soft. 
softly murmur 


- ing- 


B 


5 


7- 


5 3 5 


6 


4 3 3 


11-1 1 


1 


2g 


9 


9 


99 9 9 


9 


9 9 9 


9 99 5 5 





iG 



A .1- 4 1 


5- 4 


3 3 1 


1 1 


II 


R 


1 5- 


"4 


3 


3 1 1 y 


2c 9 99 

There's mu 
iG ^ 


9 99 

- sic in 


9 9 

the wild - 


9 9 

wood, 






9 

Mu- 


99 

sic 


9 
on 


9 

the breeze. 


B 1- 2 1 


3- 3 


1 1 


1 1 


y 


R 


1 3- 


3 


1 


1 1 « 


2g 9 99 


9 99 


9 7 


9 9 






9 


99 


9 


7 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 171 



la 


Loud. 4 2 


1-111 


1« 


A R 5 


I 6- 6 CI 6 1 9 ' T 5 1 


9 99 9 9 


1 li 


2g 9 ' 
And 

iG 


shouts of joyous childhood. Ringing 


'mong the leafy 


trees. 


]5 R 1 


1 4- 4 4 4 1 2 1 


1" 1 


! 1- il 



2c ' 9 9 99 9 9 9 7 5 7 9 99 5 5 

9 9 9 9 9 

2 There's music in the waterfall, as singing on its way, 

In chorus with the mocking-bird, its sparkUng waters play, 
The black-bird on the hawlhorn bush, trills forth his notes so gay ; 
And mournfully the whippoorwill, chants out a solemn lay. 
Oh, there's music in the wildwood, &c. 

3 The hayings of the staunch bloodhound, among the golden corn; 
The deep and plaintive windings, of the mellow, mellow horn; 
The tollings of the distant bell, upon the soft winds borne ; 

Are blending with the echoes of the early summer morn. 
Oh, there's music in the wildwood, &c. 



TEMPERANCE HYMN. 



A .1 




1 .1 R 1 


1 1 R 


.1 


S 2 1 


43 

Stay, 
6g 


6 5 

father, 


Stay : the 


6 5 

night is wild; 


Oh! 


leave not 


B 




1 R 


1 R 




1 


43 ,1 

6o 


3 5 


5 5 


5 4 3 


• 3 


5 5 



A .5- 2 I 3 3 1 1 R I) .1 2 2 



43 



now your dy - ing child ; I feel the i - cy 



B .1- 


1 


/^ 


R 


ll 








1 


.1- 


1 


4a 
6a 


5 6 


6 

9 


5 

> 


3 




.3 


5 


5 






5 


A 3 


3 11 


R 


1 


1 1- 






1 


1 


3- 


2 


•1 11 


4s 

hand 

Gg 


9 > 

of death, 


9 


9 

And 


6 

9 

shorter, 


5- 9 

shorter, 




9 

grows my 


breath. 


B 


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R 




1 








I 






II 


4s 


6 5 3 


9 


3 


fi- 


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3- 


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5- 


5 


.1 ' 



172 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE BONGSTER. 

2 Stay, father, stay : ere morning's light 
My soul rnay wing her upward flight, 
And oh 1 I cannot, cannot die, 
While thou, my father, are not by. 

3 Stay, father, stay : my mother's gone, 
And thou and I are left alone ; 

And from her star-lit home on high 
She '11 weep that I alone should die. 

4 Stay, father, stay : oh ! leave this night 
The mad'ning bowl, whose withering blight 
Hath cast so dark a shade around 

The home where joy alone was found. 

5 Slay, father, stay: alone — alone — 
With none to cheer, and none to mourn ; 
How can 1 leave this world of woe. 
And to the land of spirits go ? 

6 Stay, father, stay ; once more I ask 
Oh ! count it not a heavy task 

To stay with me till life shall end, 
My last, my only earthly friend. 



MY MOTHER'S HOME. 



40 






A 5 1 6 5 3 


5 15 5 


3 5 1 5 5 3 1 i 3- It 


23s » 


9 9 


9 9 9 


The day was gone. 


the night was 


dark, The howling winds went by, 


4a 






B 1 1 3 1 1 


2 1 3 1 


12 13 1 1 (1 


23s 9 


9 9 


9 9 5 5 5- 



|4g 

[ A 5- I 5 53"5 I 55355 |-534S | T^i 

|23s 9 9 9 99 99 9 9 



The blinding sleet fell thick and fast. From a stern and stormy sky j 



B l«.|3112|3112a|31 I 1« II 

238 ' 9 9 9 99 99 9 6 5 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 173 



4q 1 1 


Ar55|66 6@|5535|666 6|5-j| 


23s 99 99 9 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 


And a mournful wail, through the rushing gale, 

Was heard at the cottage door ; 


4g 


Br11|44644|3112|33353|2-|| 


23s 99 99 9 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 



4a 1- 1 




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5 55356|655432|1-|[ 


23s 9 9 


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999 99 99 999999 


Oh ! carry me hack ! 


Oh 


carry me back, To my mother's home once more. 


4a 






B 5- j 5 4^. 3 2 


1 1 


2 2 2 12 2 1 /^-N 1 1- Ij 


23s ' 9 9 


9 


9 * > » » 5 5 5 6 7 



2 A youth had left his mountain home — 

Had wandered far and long — 
Had drained the goblet's liery tide, 

At the festal midnight throng, 
But a dream of home came o'er his heart, 

As he crept to the cottage door ; 
Oh ! carry me back ! &c. 

3 Like to the weary wandering bird, 

I '11 seek my mountain nest, 
And lay this aching head once more, 

On my gentle mother's breast ; 
Once more I '11 seek the household hearth, 

By the elm tree old and hoar; 
Oh ! carry me back ! &c. 



THE EUM PAUPER'S BURIAL, l. 




3a 




A34 5 5- 1 532 1- | 34565 s4 | 


• 5- II 


23o > > > y i > i t ) y y y 




Bury him there — No matter where ! Hustle him out of the 


way; 


3q 




B112 3-I 1-1 14321 


.1- II 


23c 9 ♦ ' 5 5 5 6 7 » ' » ' 

9 9 9 9 9 





174 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

3g 1" . ^ 

AS s4 5 6 5 I 6 6 7 \ 7 6 5 4 3 2 | :Tirij 

23c' 9 9 ""^ ^ ^^ ^ ^~~^ ^ ^ ^ ^* 

Trouble enough TVe have with such sUiff. Taxes and money to pay. 

3a 



B112 33 I 444 5-1 3s4 5 | .1' \ 

2371 9 5 i 9 9 5 9 9 9 6 6 7 

2 Bury him there — 
No matter where ! 

Off in some corner at best! 

Tliere 's no need of stones 

Above his bones, 
Nobody '11 ask where they rest 

3 Bury him there — 
No matter where ! 

None by his death are bereft; 

Stopping- to pray? 

Shovel away ! 
We still have enough of them left. 



MERRILY 0! 
Words by H. S. Farwell. 



2g <^^2 — 3 11 1 2 4 


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• 1 


A1113355I 979| 


7 6 7 


1 II 


8q$9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 

Merrily every bosom boundeth, Merrily 0! 
Whoever the song of Temp 'ranee soundeth, Merrily ! 

2g$ r~2—s 1 ^-2— V 


9 9 9 

merrily 
merrily 
^-2~. 


REP. 

0! 

0! 

RRP. 


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5 5 5 


1 .111 



3q 9 

Every joy the home surroundeth, Merrily ! Merrily '. 

"Gil 12 1- 1311 12 1- 13 

A 9 ? I 7 9 9 7 I 9 9 I 7 9 9 7 1 R |j 

B^ 9 99 9 99 REP. Is. 

I There the parents' smile hath more brightness, 

! There the youthful heart hath more lightness ; 

2o 1 1 

lil3|555 5 -5| llll|555 5"5 | 1 1 R H 
'3q 9 9 9 9 9 ~" 99 9 9 9 9 9 99 * 



NATJONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



175 



2g 



^-2— 



3 3 3 


3 3 3 


3 3 3 


1 


3 3 3 


7 


5 5 5 1 


.3- 11 


Sq 9 ' 9 


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9 9 9 




9 9 9 




9 9 9 




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Ill 


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3 5 


^-2~^ 
111 


2 4 


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7 7 7 


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Merrily, 


merrily, 


merrily 


. 0! 


merrily 


0! 


merrily 


01 


2g ^-2—^ 


^-2— s 


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1 


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Bill 


111 


Ill 


1 1 


Ill 


1 5 


5 5 5 


.1- II 



3(i 



2 Wearily every bosom pineth, 

Wearily O ! wearily O ! 
Where'er the weed Interap'rance twineth, 
Wearily O ! wearily O ! 
Here the parents* smile dies in sadness, 
Here the youthful heart hath no gladness ; 
Every flower of life declineth. 

Wearily O ! wearily O ! 
Wearily, wearily, wearily O ! 

Wearily O ! wearily O ! 

3 Cheerily then awake the chorus, 

Cheerily O ! cheerily O ! 
All our v/ay is light before us, 

Cheerily O ! cheerily O ! 
If a virtuous life hath more pleasure 
Than where care and strife fill each measure, 
Why not join the temp 'ranee chorus ? 

Cheerily O ! cheerily O ! 
Cheerily, cheerily, cheerily O ! 

Cheerily O ! cheerily O ! 



MAINE LAW FLAG.'^ 
By R. E. H. Levering. 

Tune — " Temperance Flag.'' p. 50. 
1 Our Flag is true! Our Flag is true ! 

The Maine Law Flag of bright renown ! 
Our Flag is true ! Our Flag is true ! 

The Standard Flag the work to crown! 
That glorious Banneret is waved 

By patriot hands with patriot aim, 
And shall be till our race is saved 
Of every land and every name! 

'^ From the " TempC7ance. Mn^wiarJ' 



176 NAIIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 Our Flag is bright ! Our Flag is briglit ! 

Its radiance is the heavenly flame ! 
Our Flag is bright ! Our Flag is bright ! 

And shows the source from wheuce it came ! 
It waves in mercy o'er the world, 

To save from sin and s^ave from crime, 
And never shall its charms be furled. 

'Till comes the heaven-appointed time ! 

3 Our Flag is pure ! Our Flag is pure ! 

No party stain obscures its v^hite ! 
Our Flag is pure ! Our Flag is pure ! 

No lucre shall its glories blight ! 
'T is waved by men of every name, 

For general bliss and general good ; 
And not for earthly gold or fame. 

But for the higher praise of God ! 

4 Our Flag is strong! Our Flag is strong! 

The RIGHT and truth shairncvcr fail! 
Our Flag is strong ! Our Flag is strong! 

Its heavenly mission must prevail I 
'T is blest by ijeaven and blest by earth, 

And doubly blest shall bless again , 
And God shall help its goincs forth 

To triumph over hill and plain ! 

5 Our Flag is free ! Our Flag is free ! 

The Sons of Freedom wave it high ! 
Our Flag is free I Our Flag is free I 

And Freedom is its destiny ! 
To free the body, soul, and mind. 

From alcohol's black sin and death ; 
To raise the free to joys refined, 

And grace them with the conqueror's wreath! 

6 Oar Flag shall spread ! Our Flag shall spread! 

'Till EVEiiY State the Maine Law own ! 
Our Flag shall spread ! Our Flag shall spread ! 

'Till Alcohol is dead and gone I 
'Till all the Union, happier sllll, 

Completely freed from Rum's cursod power, 
Shall every glorious trait reveal 

To glory rise to sin no more I 



THE SUNSET TREE. 177 



2a g 


3 


.1 














A 5 


1 




3- 3 


3 1 


5 5 3« 


3 1 2 3 


4 


5 i 


2c 
Love 

2a g 


love! 


love! 


99 

Love for 


99 

the 


9 9 9 

fallen weak! 


99 9 9 

From realms of 


9 

joy 


9 

he 


B 1 


1 1 


.1 


1- 1 


1 ! 


111 = 


1 1 




1 


2c 






99 


99 


9 9 9 


'9 3 5 


5 


5 



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3 


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lo 


1 


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99 1 


1 i^ ' 


' T 


11 


2c 

2tJ 


9 

fled, The 


9 
lost 


in 


sin 


to 


seek, 


99 

And to 


9 

hring to 


9 

life the 


dead ; 


B 


1- 1 1 


3 


5 


5 


4 


1 3- 


3 3 


1 1 




1" 11 



2g 












,-^ 


A 


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2 


5 5 s4 1 5 


5 5 1 


T 6 5 s4 


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2c 

2g 


9 

He 


9 
left 


9 9 9 

his glorious throne 


9 9 

And his 


9 9 9 9 

angel hosts a - 


9 9 

bove, And 


B 


1 


1 


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4 3 2 1 


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9 9 9 9 


5 



REP. Is. 

2g ' 2 1 el 



2g 9 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 

claimed "us for his own, It was love, un - hounded love. 
2g rep. Is. 



B_ ^ I 1 1 1 I I «i _n 

2€'^ 6- 6 6 6 9 9 3 5 5 3 



2 Love ! love ! love ! 

Love for the sick and faint! — 

'T was love his footsteps moved : 
Where sorrow dwelt he went, 

And the poor his friendship proved ; 
The haunts of grief he sought, 

And the dungeons of despair; 
And oh ! what deeds he wrought 

Por the sick and dying there. 



178 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

3 Love ! love ! love ! 

Love on the cross displayed ! 

The Prince of Life to bleed ! 
In death's damp prison laid ! — 

It was love, pure love indeed ! 
For us from death arose ! — 

He arose and went on high — 
He triumphed o'er our foes, 

And he lives no more to die. 

4 Love! love! love I 

Love on the throne of heaven ! 

He changes not his name ; 
All power to him is given. ^ 

And his love is still the same ; 
And we shall share his throne, 

For he died and lived for this ; 
Bright heaven shall be our own — 

An eternity of bliss ! vv. H. 



THE TEMPERANCE STATE. 



6a 



Oil 


1111 1 


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9 


, 7 T 7 7 

9 9 




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A I 2 


( 3 3 3 2 3 


4" 3 3 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 


3- 1 11 


23q" '9 


9 9 9 9 


9 9 9 9 9 




We have 


come from hiU and 


yalley. We've come from hill and 


valley, 


6g 








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9 

6g $ /-^ 




9 5 5 5 3 4 

9999 


3- 


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23q99 99 9 9 9 9 

For a glorious Temp'rance 
Ani we'll swell the mighty 
6g $ 


rally, 
chorus, 


9 9 9 9 9 

From the old Temp'rance State ; 
Throughout the Temp'rance State. 


15 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


1 ! 


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23(J99 99 9 9 


7- 


5 5 5 5 5 





NATIONAL TEMrERANCE SONGSTER. 179 



f6o 






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REP. 2s. 


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4 


i 3- 


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6g 


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99 99 


9 


9 


REP. 23. 


A 3 4 1 5 5 6 


6 


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23q'9 99 9 

Oh, the Maine Law is 

6o 


9 

be 


■ fore 


99 99 

US, The 


9 

Maine Law is 


9 

be . 


fore us. 

REP. 23 


B 1 1 1 11 




1 1- 


1 1 


1 1 1 




• 1- 1 II 


23q 99 99 9 4 


4 




9 


9 4 


4 





2 We will see our sisters, brothers, 
Our fathers, and our mothers, 
Wilh our neis^hbors and all others, 

In the old Temp'rance State. 

Ob, the Maine Law, &c, 

3 We will stop the curse of stilling 
All kinds of drink for killing, 
And all fermented swilling, 

In the old Temp'rance State. 

Oh, the Maine Law, &c. 

4 Now come, ye jolly tillers, 
Ye lawyers, doctors, stillers. 
Come, ye jug and bottle fillers, 

In the old Temp'rance State 

Oh, the Maina Law, kc. 

5 Then hurrah for reformation, 
By all in every station, 
Throughout ihe whole creation. 

And the old Temp'rance State. 

Oh, the Maine Law, &c. 

6 See the Maine Law banner floating. 
Where the Temp'rance boys are voting, 
And the cause of peaco promoting 

Throughout the Temp'rance State. 

Oh, the Maine Law, «Stc. 

7 May no evil e'er betide ns, 
To sever or divide us, 

But the God of mercy guide us, 
In this our happy State. 

Oh* the Maine Law, &c. 



IHO NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

SONG OF THE HOPELESS. 

Tune — " Old Folks at Home.'" 

1 Long time before my pledge was broken, 

Long, long ago, 
1 went where love and truth were spoken/ 

And where the warm hearts glow. 
Oh ! sadly, sadly now we wander, 

All, all alone, 
With none to please and none to pander. 

For now thy memory's gone. 
All the world is sad and dreary, 

Everywhere I roam, 
Oh ! hark ye, how my heart grows weary, 

Fai* from my temperance home. 

2 Naught in the wor'd to give me pleasure, 

Life is a waste, 
No soft repose nor mental leisure, 

Kind death I bid you haste. 
Here, where the flowers I used to gather, 

Round mother's grave, 
The gray hairs of my poor old fath«r, 

My heart hard would not save, 
All the world, &c. 

3 The joys of earth, the hopes of heaveii, 

Are never mine; 
My brain's on fire, my heart is riven, 

All with the use of wine. 
Oh, why should I strive any longer, 

Pbather let me die, 
The lust of liquor's only stronger, 

The oftener I cry. 

All the world, &c. 



A BAND OF FREEMEN. 



2g 1 












1 


A 9 7 


16 6 6 


6 


1 6 5 3 3 1 5 5 5 


5 


1 5 3 


9 7 1 


2q 9 
The tee 

2g 


9 9 9 

- totallers 


9 

are 


9 9 9 9 9 9 9 

coming, The tee - totallers 


9 

are 


9 9 

coming, 


9 

The toe- 
p 


A 6 


6 6 6 


1 


6 5 3 3 1 5 


5 


5 1 


5 II 



2(i 

to - tal - lers are coming. With the cold water pledge 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. \t}l 



2a cHouus. 
A 1 2 












3- 3 


1 5 3 


2 1 


1 2- 2 


1 3 2 1 2 i 


2q 9 9 
We're a 

2q 


9 
band of 


9 9 

freemen, 


9 9 

We're a 


9 

band of 


9 5 9 9 

freemen, We're a 


B 1 


1- 1 


1 1 1 






i 1 1 


2q 9 5 


9 


9 9 


7 6 


5- 5 


5595 



2a 










P 




A 


3- 


3 


1 5 3 2 11 


6- 6 6- 6 


6 


IJ 


2q 
2a 


band 


9 
Of 


9999 
freemen, And well 


9 99 9 99 

sound it through the 


land. 
p 




B 


1- 


1 


111 1 


1 1 1 




II 


2q 




9 


9 9 7 6 


&m 99 6- 99 


6 





2 We have alcohol forsaken, 
We will all the land awaken, 
Standing firmly and unshaken, 

To the cold water pledge. 
We 're a band, &c. 

3 We will save our sisters, brothers, 
Our fathers., sons, and mothers, 
Our neighbors and all others, 

With our cold water pledge. 
We 're a band, &c. 

4 We will stop the curse of 'stilling 
Alcoholic drink for killing, 

And all fermented swilling, 
With the cold water pledge. 
We 're a band, &c. 

5 Then come, ye jolly tillers, 
Preachers, doctors, lawyers, 'stillers, 
Come, ye jug and bottle fillers, 

Take the cold water pledge. 
We 're a band, Sec. 

6 Then hurrah for reformation, 
Yes, by all in every station, 
Through all the wide creation. 

With the cold water pledge. 
V^c 're a baiid, &.c. 



NATIONAL TEMPER A -\C£ SONGSTER. 

7 Now the caase of peace promoting, 
Where the people all are voting, 

With the " iMahie Law " banners floating 
And the cold water pledge. 
We 're a band, &c. 

8 May no evil e'er betide us, 
Which can sever or divide us, 
But the God of mercy guide us, 

With the cold water pledge. 
We re a band, &c. 



SIGNING THE PLEDGE. 
Br Phcebe Carey. 

Tune — ^' New Home^ p. 33. 

. Nay. come not to me with your pledges, before 
You have pledged yourself never to drink any more ; 
For 1 care not what else you may think or may do, 
Yoa must turn from the wine-cup, or I will from you. 

2 You can " love me as well and as truly," you say : 
If you can, I can 't *' honor, resp^et t and obey : " 

I mi,i?ht think all your words and your wishes a joke. 
If in sober earnest not always you spoke. 

3 If my eyes are not brighter to you than the foam 
Of the wine cup, I never can gladden your home ; 
And the lip that to me its devotion would prove 
Must only be sweet with the red wine of love. 

4 And you smile, do you, Harry? You '11 come to repent, 
For I tell you it is n't like me to relent; 

I never will like you, I '11 never forgive, 
And 1 never will have you so long as I live ! 

5 You may do almost anything else that you please ; 
You may even get angry, may scold, or may tease ; 

You may smoke till you 're lost in the clouds, if you won't; 
You may chew if you choose, and 1 '11 never say don't. 

6 You may go out and spend pleasant evenings from home, 
And 1 11 never look sullen nor cross when j'ou come; 
Only always remember I 'm waiting — and then 

I 'd rather you 'd be back as early as ten. 

7 And you won't sign the pledge, Harry ! what shall I do? 
For I think you love me, and I know I love you. 

" You are right, but, dear Mary, you uj*ge me in vain ; 

For 1 signed fhe pl<?dg^ last oi|-hlJ, anri phnrt't, df> it agaia ! " 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



183 



WHO 

Gg $ 


'D 


'A THOUGHT 


OF 


SEEING YOU? 

REP. 


Is. 




A 5 


i 3 


3 


3 2 1 1 i 1 Jl 


1 1 




12 1 






ll 


236 

Sup 
6g 


9 9 f 

- pose a man makes up his mind, 
like to know which way he'd go, 


9 G 

To take 


9 9 

a walk out 


7 6 5 

9 

on the street 

REP. Is. 


> 


n 1 


1 I 


1 


111 II 


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1! 


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111 II 5i3535|4: 3 -1 2 5 j 3 5 3 5 I 4 3 4 2 || 



2Ss9 15979 9 9 9 9999 9 9» »99 

And not with drunken loafers meet. They are so common everywhere ; 

Up street, down street, across and through, 
6g 



B 1 I 



Ijlllllllj.^ Ijlllll 



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6g 



4 6 5 5 55 



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9 9 » 



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They meet you with an idiot stare, " 
G of seeing 3 ou 



9 9 9799507 9 

9 9 9 9 

Why who'd 'a thought 

I W'liy who'd 'a thought of seeing you I " 



3i I 



1 1 1 



6667 959 446' 5555 4s4 56 * 

99 9 9 9 9 9 

The devil's tea for black and blue ; 
You answer with a sneering flout, 
" Why, who'd 'a thought of seeing 

you? 
Why who'd 'a thought of seeing 

you?" 

4 While on my rounds, sirs, not 
long .since, 
I met a politician brave ; 
Said I, good sir, now do not wince, 

But let us try the laud to save. 
Let's have a pro liibi lion law, 

The only tlung, sir, that will do; 
So bring the nnnaiies up to law ; 
Said he, " VV^hy^ neiglibor, is that 

you ! 
Why, who'd 'a thought of seeing 
'you ? " 



'2 In old **Kentuck " the other day, 

Wiiile traveling over dale and hill, 
I fjuiid a l.'hriotian elder, gray, 

Who made and sold by jug and gill. 
I took him rallier unawares, 

Is this the way that Christians do ? 
He answered, (savage as a bear,) 

*' Wljy, Mister, what is that to 
3 ou — 

Why, who'd 'a thought of seeing 
you ? " 

C The devil's tea-kettle you boil, 

Six-seveuths of each blessed week 
And then in sanctimonious style, 
Yo'i tfill poor souls the Lord to 
seek. 
And wiien you 're charged with 
pQurisag- out 



184 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

THE DRmK OF THE FREE. 

1 Give sparkling cold water, the drink of the free, 
Give sparkling cold water — cold water to me ; 
The waters that gush from the steep mountain side, 
Dash onward with music a silvery tide, 

The roe of the forest oft comes to the brink 
Of the smooth gliding rill, its waters to drink. 

2 There is health in the drops as they fall froa. the skies, 
And life in the springs, in the valleys that rise ; 

And the pure sparkling water was graciously given, 
For life and for health, by our Father in heaven : 
Then come, ye intemperate, leave brandy and wine ,* 
Drink only the beverage that is all divine. 

3 The broad noble river, gliding on to the sea, 
Bears health on its bosom — and ever is free ; 
It sings, as it hastens through valleys along, 
A charming, a beautiful, soul-stirring song; 
And this is its lay as it glides to the sea, 

" Cold water, cold water's the drink of the free." 

4 How welcome, reviving to bad and to flov/er, 
Is the health-imparting, warm April shower; 

And glitters the rain-drop, like some sea-washed gem, 
On floweret expanding, on bud and on stem ; 
And night-dews that fall at the still hour of even. 
Are welcome to earth-land as rain drops from heaven. 

5 Give sparkling cold water, cold water to me, 
'Twas made by the Maker as drink for the free ; 
" The floweret drinks with its neat little cup, 

The warm shower falleth — the fields drink it up ; " 
Then huzza ! for cold water, the drink of the free — 
Give sparkling cold water, cold water to me. 

SONG OF JOY. 

Tune — " Beacon Light.'' 

1 From morning's golden portals, 

To evening's setting sun, 
Columbia's erring mortals, 

Have bowed the knee to rum ; 
From the Atlantic ocean. 

Across the western plain, 
There's been a great devotion 

To hi!g the drunkard's chain. 



NATIONAL TEMPEr^ANCE SONGSTER. 



185 



2 What though the summer breezes 

Blow soft o'er soalhern lands, 
Though northern prospect pleases, 

And cheers the heart of man; 
In vain with lavish kindness. 

The gifts of God are strovi^n, 
So long as men, in blindness, 

Bovt^ dovi^n to Demon Hum. 

3 Can we who 've seen the evil 

Of drinking wine and beer, 
Can we, for drunkards fearful, 

Restrain the falling tear ? 
Cold v/ater, Oh, cold water ! 

The joyful words proclaim, 
Till tipplers all have sought her. 

And washed away their shame. 

4 Waft, waft, ye winds, the story 

And you proclaimers go ; 
Let none be left abiding 

The drunkard's deeper woe. 
Oh, make the soul now joyful, 

That has been sad so long ; 
Till drunkard's break the bottle, 

And join the Temp'rance song. 



4s 



CITY LOAFER. 



1 11 11 



111 



^ 



I 2- 



I 'U sing you a modern ballad, made by a 



7 9 

modern 



pat€, 



AG 



2 2 » 



2 2 



"*"T 



|2Ci 99 '9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 99 9 9 

Of a ragged, ru\a-nosed vagabond, Whose clothes were his es- 



4o 










A 3- 


II 3 


3 3 3 3 


3 3 3 3 3 


4- 3 2 3 T 


2(4 


9 


> 9 » > 


f 9 9 » '» 


f >> J > 



tate ; He sv/aggereJ through the market house at an iu - dependent 



186 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



4g 






A 4- 4 ! 


4 4 4 4 1 


4 4 4 4 4 1 5- 4 » 4 1 6- !! 


2q 

rate. And 

4g 


> » > > 

often asked for 

1 


charity, at the -R-eaithy merchant's gate, 


|A 1 1 I 


1 ' 7 6 1 


e- 5 5 i 5 3 4 3 S 1 I" il 



Like a ragged, rum-iiosed vagabond, all of the modern time. 

2 His rags so tliick, hung all around, like ribbons from a pole ; 
His hat it lacked a rim and crown, his shoes they lacked a sole. 

He lingered round the butchers' stalls, with tattered vest and hose, 
Or al a kitchen door he stood, and snulied liis rum-red nose, 
Like a hungry, loafer vagabond, ail of the modern time. 

3 When winter cold brought Christmas old, he left the butcher's stall; 
He liked the smell of beef — but cold he could not bear at all. 

At night he was a wanderer, and joined the midnight brawl 
Of restless spirits, black and white, who graced the watch-house hall-^ 
Like a homeless, shivering vagabond, all of the modern time. 

GOME, COME, COME. 

1 Come, come, come, 
Come to the Temp'rance Hali, 

The pledge of freedom sign ; 
Come, banisli alcohol. 

Rum, brandy, beer and wine, 
From the dens of drunken mirth. 

The dark abodes of rum 
Where sorrow has its birth, 

Come forth, ye rummies, come. 

2 Ye that the brandy red 

Are mighty to consume. 
Come, let it ne'er be said, 

Ye fear the temp'rance room. 
Ye topers, leave your beer, 

Brightly although it foam ; 
To the water cold and clear, 

Ye red nosed drinkers, come 
Come, come, &.c. 

3 Ye boys that quaff the wine, 

With faces ail in bloom^ 
March up in goodly line — 

Room for the wine-boys, room. 
Come one, conie all, and iiee 

The drunkard's awful doom ; 
Awake, arise, be free! 

To health, wealth, honor come-. 



NATIONAL TEMPERAls^CE SONGSTER. 187 

BEACON LIGHT. a. d. filmore. 



t 1 


1 


1 


3 


i* 


i»" 


1 


3 


i 3 


a 


1 




s- 


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4o $ 




J 




9 


1- 




9 




9 




7 


REP. 




A 1 


3 


3 


5 


5 




s 


5 1 


5 


4 


3 


2 


t 1- 


R 11 



23q' 9 r ? 9 9 

A beacon has been lighted, Bright as the noon-day sun ; 

On worlds of mind be - nighted, Ics rays are pouring down. 

4g 



B 1 I 



23q' '9 9 4 5 5 

9 9 

Dismayed has shrunk in terror, Be - fore the lighted flame ^ 



4g 



1 


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1 12 3 3 1 


1 R 


i« 


2m ' 
40 


9 9 9 
/-N 1- 


9 9 9 9 


7- 

REP. Is. 




A 5 


17 7 5 6 7 1 3 5 


13 4 5 9 5 3 


1 2- R 


II 


23q » 

Full 
40 


9 9 9 9 9 

many a shrine of error, And 


9 9 9 9 9 

many a deed of 


shame, 
REP. Is. 




B 


i 11-11 


i 1 1 1 1 


1 R 


II 



2S(^ 5 



5 5 5 5 



2 Intemperance has foundered, 

The demon gasps for breath ; 
His rapid march is downward. 

To everiastiuL' death. 
Old age and youth united. 

His works have prostrate hurled, 
And soon himself, aitVighted, 

Shall hurrv from this world. 



3 Bold temperance, untiring-, 

strikes at tlie monster's heart; 
Beneatlj her blows expiring, 

He dreads her well-aiaied dart. 
Her blows, we '11 pray, " God speeJ ihem,' 

The (larktiess to dispel; 
And how we tougiit for IVcedora, 

Let future '^.gea tell. 



BEN BOLT. L, 



A. 


3 415556 6- 515542 s5 5(66523 4-1 •5-1 


4c 

2g 


99 99 9? 9 99 9999 99 

Oh don't you remember sweet Alice, Ben Bolt ? Sweet Alicej with hair so brown, 


C 


1213334 4-31331 33(4 42 12|.3»l! 


40 


99 99 99 9 99 •2'9999 ^'9 



2o 



i^ 3415234121365 5 9 6(5 5 123321. l-li 


4c 99 99 99 99 99 9999 99 

She wept with delight when you gaye her a smile, And she trembled with fear at 

your frown. 
2g ^-^ P 


012(3 121 11423 5-4133. 11 'l. 1-11 



14C 9 9 19 9 Y 9 9 9 99 9 9 5 9 7 



2a ^^111 



A 


3 


4 


5 


6 t 


9 


'IT 


T 


6 


5 


5 


5 14 4 


4 


6 5 


5 


3 1 


.2-11 


4o 

i2o 


9 9 9 9 

In the old church-yard, 


9 9 

in the yalley, 


9999 9999 

Ben Bolt, In a corner obscure and alone, 


ic 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 5 


5 I 5 


5 


4 


3 


1 


112 2 


2 


4 3 


3 


1 1 


!! 



2g 










^-^ 










>- 


1- 


^_>, 






A 


3 


2 


1 1 


1 


3 4 


5 


5 


5 1 T 


T 


6 


5 5 9 6 15 5 


12 3 3 2 1 


• 1- 


il 


4g 9 
They 

2g 


9 9 9 

tiave fitted 


9 9 9 9 9 

a slab of granite so 


9 9 

gray, 


9 99 9999 99 

And sweet Alice lies under the stone, 
p 







1 




1 






1 


3 


3 1 5 


5 


4 


3 5-4133 


1 1 1 


.1- 


li 


4c 


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7 


6 


6 


6 




9 


9 9 


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9 9 9 9 9 


5 9 T 







2 Oh don't you remember the wood, Ben Bolt^ 

Near the green, sunny slope of the hill; 
Where oft we have played, 'neath its wide spreading shade, 

And kept time to the click of the mill ? 
The mill has gone to decay, Ben Bolt, 

And a quiet now reigns all around; 
And the old rustic porch y/ith its roses so sweet, 

Lies scattered, and fallen on the ground. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANClT SONGSTER. 



189 



Oh don't you remember the school, Ben Bolt, 

And the master so kind and so true ; 
And the little nook, by the clear running brook. 

Where we gathered the flowers as they grew ? 
On the master's grave grows the grass, Ben Bolt. 

And the running little brook is now dry -, 
And of all the friends who were schoolmates then, 

There remains, Ben, but you and I. 



3g . . 




BEN BOLT^S REPLY. 

112 


L. 

3- 


2 


1 1 


A 1 3 


1 5 


6 


5 6 '1 




9 


M 


4c 9 9 

Oh 
3g 


yes, 


9 
I 


9 9 

re - mem - ber the mas 


■ ter 


SO 


true. His 


C 1 


1 1 


3 


3 4 6 5)5 


5- 


4 


3 II 3 1 


4c 




9 


9 9 9 




9 





3g 



-111 



A 6 6 



4 I ,3- 



1 3 



3 6 5 6 



3g 



kindness I ne'er shall for - get ; And the clear running brook and the 

Yet, the spot where in childhood we 



C 4 4 6 2 2- 2 I .3» || 1 1 j 1 3 3 4 6 5 



'4c 



3g 


2 3» 2 1 


1—. 






A 


9 11 


9 6 


1 5 5 4 3 3 2 1 .1- 1! 3 


5 1 


4c 
3g 


vi - - lets blue, 
mer - ri - ly play'd, 


9 

Are 
I 


9 9 9 9 9 

fresh in my memory yet. Tho' 
can trace thro' the vista of years. 


9 

the 





5 5- 4 3 II 


3 3 


13 1 I .1- II 1 


3 1 


140 


9 


9 9 


9 t 6 5 5 9 


9 



3g 1 


1 








1 


2 


2 


1 






1 


1 








REP 


. 3 & 4g. 


A 


9 


7' 


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T 


9 


1 


9 


9 


t 


11 5 1 




9 


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6 


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.5- 11 


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fond hopes and wishes of youth have decayed, A 
3g 


9 9 9 
id smiles are less frequent than 
tonrs, 
REP. 3 Sc 4s. 


5 


5 


5 


4 


3 


s5 


6 


6 


5 


5 


II 3 1 


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.3- 1" 


4c 


9 


9 




9 


9 




9 


9 








9 


9 




9 


9 





190 NATIONAlf TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 Ah, yes, I remember the wood and the hill, 

And the SOUL'S wliicli we sani^ witli such glee, 
Tlie fVirmer's old homestead, the porch and the mill, 

And the silvery sycamore tree. 
You say that " a quiet now reii<ns all around," 

1 wish it would reii^ni in rny breast, 
Where sorrow and troubles and trials abound 

With anij'uish, and grief, and unrest. 

3 Ah, yes, I remember the lovely and pure 

"Sweet Alice, with hair so brown : " 
It is well she lies 'neath the granite, secure 

From sin and the cold world's frown. 
She is happier far than the few who remain 

On this sin-stained and cruel shore ; 
Then let us hope on till we meet her again, 

Where sighing and tears are no more. L. 



THE ORPHAN^S APPEAL. 
Words by F. A. B. Simkins. 

Tune — '' JeanneUe and Jeannot." p. 32. 

1 My father once was bold and strong, 

And braved life's voyage well; 
How much he loved, how much beloved, 

No human tongue can tell. 
They came, kind friends, though strangers. 

To win my father o'er 
To temprance, and he promised 

He would touch the bowl no more. 
Then my mother w^as so happy, 

And my own heart leaped for joy ; 
My own dear father smiled again. 

Upon his darling boy. 
But evil hands held to his lips 

The blasting " curse of soul ; " 
And, templed over- much, he fell 

A victim to the bowl. 

% Our cup of happiness was full — 

Alas ! too full to last: 
Those blissful hours of beaming joy 

Like visions flitted past. 
Wliere'er my father traced his steps, 

The guileful cup was ihere: 
Temptation overcame — 

He drank " the chalice of despair." 



NA'nONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 191 

Oh. to see liim reeling come, 

Once so loving, now so (iamb! 
It broke my own <iear molhcrs heart: 

Tlie bli-liting, damning nun ! 
And he who once was kind and true. 

Whose presence once would cheer; 
Now made our home a demon's haunt, 

And filled our hearts with fear. 



3 Then she whom he h^d sworn to love, 

His partner and his pride, 
In meekness and in grief unspoken, 

Bowed low her head and died ! 
My father is in prison, while 

The WM-etcbes who prepared 
The potion that has placed him there, 

Hy Christian laws are spared ! 
Oh, ye men of feeling hearts, 

And of motives good and pure, 
How can ye wink at crime so long ? 

Nay, how so much endure? 
In God s own name, why seek ye not 

To hold and puntsh those 
Who deal tl/e damning liijuid out, 

And crime's great fountain close ? 



WHAT CAN THE MATTER BE ? 

5g $ CHORUS. 



OU $ __1_ ; 

A 5- 5- I 5 3 > 5 3 1 I 4« 1- | > 2 3 I i '^ ■■' 

23q » 9 » > 1 "' - - ^ ^ , , , , 

Oh, dear, what, can t!io matter bu '' Dt'.ir de:ir, v.h.it i-:in tl»« tuHrrrr h.-. Oi, 



^^ >* 1- I i i t 1 111 [__ _. I 

I23q « 9 9 9 9 9 ft« 5« 5 5 5 5 <l ft 



1" 



192 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

5a ^^_________ 



C 3- 


3 


13 3 1 1 








1 




1 




R 1! 


2Sci 


9 


9 9 9 9 
9 

1 


6 

9 


9 


9 


5 

9 


9 


5 

9 


3- 




A 5« 


1 ^ 


3 9 5 3 1 




1 


4 


3 


4 


2 


1- 


^ 11 



23a '9 9 9 9 6 

dear, what can the matter he, What shall I do with my rum ? 



B 4- 


111111 1 




! 1- It il 


23q 

2a 


9 9 9 9 9 9 4 

9 


4 
9 


4 5 5 5 1- 

9 9 9 9 
1 


A 5 


1 5 3 4 6 3 4 


1 


5395311 


23ci 9 
Oh, 

.5a 


9 9 9 9 9 9 

see the Maine Law hoys are 




9 9 9 9 9 

playing the dickens, The 


JA 4 2 


3423 1 4234 


3 


2 1 5 3 4 5 3 4 1 


23q 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 

night of confusion a - round us now thickens ; Unless the rum husiness with 
5q 1 REP. 1 & 2s. 


A 5 


395311 1 




4 3 4 2 ! 1- R !I 



(23Q 9 9 9 9 9 6 

some of us quickens, "We 'II all have to cut with our rum 

2 I used to get rich through the toiling mechanic. 
Who spent all his earnings in pleasures Satanic; 
But now I confess I am in a great panic, 

Because I can sell no more rum. 

Oh, dear, &c. 

3 My customers once to my bar-room were flocking — 
Yes, some without coat, or a shoe, or a slocking — 
But now, I declare it is really quite shocking," 

I cannot dispose of my rum. 

Oh, dear, &c. 

4 I once clothed in satin my wife and my daughter, 
But now they wear calico ; what is the matter ? 
They give up my rum for the sake of cold water ! 

Oh, what shall I do with my rum ? 

Oh, dear, &c. 

5 I '11 quit this hard business, for t' is of no use to me, 
All a continual source of abuse to me ; 

Good friends of Temp'rance I know will stick close to me, 
Soon as I give up my rum. 

Oh, dear, what can the matter be ? 
Dear, dear, what can the matter be ? 
Good by, rum-drinking customers, 
Now I will sell no more rum. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



193 



THE STAR OF TEMPERAISTCE. l. 



3a 


$ 


1 




1 REP. 




A 


R 3- 4 


15 5 6 9 I 


7 6 


R 1 5 6 7 1 R 


li 


2c 


9 99 


9 9 9 


9 9 


9 9 






Shine thou 
O'er cor 


forth in matchless 
- ruption old and 


glory, 
hoary, 


Bright Temp'rance Star ; 
33right Temp'rance Star. 




3q 








REP 




B 


R 1- 1 


1 1 3 s4 1 


5 5 


R 1 5 4 2 1 1 R 


!l 


2c 


9 99 


9 9 9 9 


9 9 


9 9 





Banish death, disease and madness, Bright Temp'rance Star 



i3g 1 


S 12 3133 3121 REP. Is. 


(A R 7- 9» 


1 9 5 9 9 1 ' 9 9 9 1 9 9 9 9 1 7 5 R II 


2c 9 

Shed a - 

3g 


9 > 9 

broad thy rays of gladness, O'er the haunts of woe and sadness, 

RE? Is. 


li R 3- 4 


|5564|3555|5365|53r|| 



2 Shine upon the captive's prison, 

Bright Temp'rance Star ; 
Tell him of the power new risen, 

Bright Temp'rance Star; 
And the realms that sit in sorrow, 
From tby rays a charm shall borrow, 
Telling of a glorious morrow, 

Bright Temp'rance Star. 

3 Shine upon the cleaving billow, 

Bright Temp'rance Star ; 
O'er the sailor's lonely pillow, 

Bright Temp'rance Star; 
Brighten every distant nation, 
Banish care and tribulation, 
Preach the tidings of salvation, 

Bright Temp'rance Star. 



4 And the mists that hover o'er thee, 

Bright Temperance Star ; 
Trembling, soon shall fly before thee. 

Bright Temperance Star; 
Hail ! all hail ! thy lustre flowing-, 
From the founts of glory glowing,^ 
Life, and health, and beauty showing, 

Blight Temp'rance Star. 



13 



194 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



5o 










EYENING 


BELLS. 


w. 


H. 


BUNTIN. 


A 




1 


1 1 


1- 


1 2 


3 1 2- 


3 3 


a 1 


1" 




1 


i 


3q 5 9 5 

Those evening 
5a 


bella 


9 9 

, those 


9 9 9 

evening "bells, How 


9 

many 


5 

9 9 

a tale their 


3 

9 

music 


5- 

tells, 


B 


1 


1 


m 


1- 


1 


1 




1 


1- 




1 


1 


k 


9 


9 


f 




9 6 


5 5- 


5 6 


6 


4 


6 


5 


1- 



5g 



11 I 1-12 3 I 2- S 3 1 I 5- a 3 2 I 1- It 



3q69» 999 999 »99 

9 

Of youth and home, and that sweet time,When last I hearcEitteir,«oo thing chime, 
5a 



B 11111-1 I i 1^ I II 



5 6 5 6 5^ 

9 9 9 9 9 9 

2 Those joyous hours have passed away ; 
And many a heart that then was gay, 
Within the tomb now darkly dwells, 
And hears no more those evening bells. 

3 And so 't will be when I am gone, 
Those tuneful peals will still ring on ; 
When other bards shall walk these dells, 
And sing thy praise, sweet evening bells. 

SOME LOVE STRONG BEER. 

Tune — " Some Love to Roam." p. 55. 

1 Some love strong drink, and the maniac's cheer, 

And the bacchanalian's glee; 
But the gurgling rill, from the rock-bound hill, 

And a peaceful home for me. 
The sot may laugh, and the poison quaff, 

And boast he's chainless, free ; 
But a healthy brain, free from mania's pain, 

Is the liberty for me. 

2 No more disgrace, with a rum-blotch face. 

The bright image of your God ! 
But look behind, with a sober mind. 

Closely scan the ground you've trod ; 
Then count the cost of pleasure's lost 

In drunken revelry ; 
And say to the world, with your pledge unfarled 

Give no more strong d fink to me. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 195 

THE DRINK FOR ME. 



4g 



1 


1 i 


1 






J 


1 


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1- 1 


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4a 


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7 7 7 6 7 

9 9 9 9 


/"^ 


9 



D 5 i 5554 I 4«33|35555| 5-5g 



23c 9 9 9, 99999 9 

The drink that's in the drunkard's bowl, Is not the drink for me ; It 

4a /^\ /"^ 



A 3 


1 


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9 






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9 9 


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9 


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9 


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4a 


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9 9 


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3- 3 


5 


23c 

kills 
4g 


9 9 

his body 


and his soul, 


9 

How 




9 

sad a 


sight 


9 

is 




he! 


9 

But 


A 3 


3 


3 


2 




2- 


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J4« 


7 7 7 

9 » 


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> 

p 


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5 5 5 j 


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15 5 5 5 


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there 

4g 


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s a drink which God has given. 


* f t t 
Distilling in the showers of heaven, In 


A 2 


2 2 2 1 


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1 3 3 3 4 5 


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23c 

40 


f f 


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P 


B 




1111 


11111 


1 I 


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:» ft 5 


f f 


> 9 


ft 6 5 5 



ly- 



196 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



40 








/'-N 






/-^ 




C 1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


! /-^ 1 


1- 3 


1 1 


23o 

4g 


9 


7 
9 




7- 


9 


7 7 7 6 7 

» > » > 


1 


9 


D 5 


5 


5 4 


1 


4- 3 


3 


15 5 5 5 1 


5- 


5 1 


23c 9 
measures 

4g 


9 

large 


and 


fre*^, 


Oh, 


> > 

that's the driuk for 


me ; 


Oh, 



A3332i2-ll|22 2 12 



5 3 I 



23g 
4g 



1 1 



1 1 



23c 



4g 








/^^P 




/^^ 








/-^ 




C 3 


1 


3 


1 1 


3- 3 


3 


3 1 


1 


/-^ 




1 1- 1 


1 


23o 
4g 1 


> 


1 


9 


/^v 


1 


> » 
1 


9 


7 6 

9 9 


7 

9 


/^N 




D 


5 




5 1 


6- 6 


' 




5 


5 


5 


3- 3 


II 


23g 9 9 
that's the drink for 

4o 


me; 
, — 1 


Oh, 


that's 


9 

the 


drink 


9 

for 


me. 




A 5 


3 


5 


3 i 


5- P 


5 


5 3 


1 


3 1 


2 


1- 1 


II 


23c 
4b 


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f 


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9 9 


9 


9 9 


9 


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1- 1 


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11 


230 


9 




9 




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9 




5 







2 The stream that many prize so high, 

Is not the stream for me ; 
For he who drinks it still is dry, 

Forever dry he '11 be : 
But there 's a stream so cold and clear, 
The thirsty traveler lingers near. 

Refreshed and glad is he. 

Oh, that's the stream for me, &c. 

3 The wine-cup that so many prize, 

Is not the cup for me : 
The aching head, the bloated face, 

In its sad train I see. 
But there 's a cup of water pure, 
And he who drinks it may be sure 

Of health, and length of days. 

Oh, that 's the oiM|^r me, &c. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

DESCRIPTION OF EUM'S DOINGS. 



197 



" Oh, thou inyisible spirit of Rum ! if thou had'st not name by which to know 
thee, we would call thee Devil."— Shakspeaee. 



1 Let thy devotee extol thee, 
And thy wond'rous virtues sum ; 

But the worst of names I'll call thee, 
Oh ! thou hydra-monster RUM ! 

2 Pimple maker — visage bloater, 
Health corrupter — idler's mate ; 

Mischief breeder — vice promoter, 
Credit spoiler — devil's bait. 

3 Alms house builder — pauper 

maker. 
Trust betrayer — sorrow's source ; 
Pocket-emptier ■ — Sabbath-breaker, 
Conscience stifler — guilt's re- 
course. 

4 Nerve-enfeebler — system shat- 

terer, 
Thirst-increaser — vagrant thief; 
Cough producer — treacherous jQat- 
terer, 
Mud-bedauber — mock relief. 

5 Business-hinderer^ — spleen dis- 

tiller, 
Woe-begetter— friendship's bane ; 
Anger-heater — Bridewell filler, 
Debt involver — toper's chain. 

6 Memory-drowner— honor wrecker, 
Judgment-warper — blue faced 

quack ; 
Feud beginner — rags bedecker, 
Strife enkindler — fortune's wreck. 

7 Summer's heater — winter's cooler, 
Blood polluter — specious snare: 

Mob collector — man's transformer, 
Bond undoer — gambler's fare. 

8 Speech bewrangler — headlong 

brill ger, 
Vitals burner — deadly fire ; 
Riot mover — firebrand flinger, .;/ 
Discord kindler — misery's sire. 



9 Sinew's robber — worth depriver, 
Strength subduer — hideous foe, 

Reason thwarter — -fraud contriver, 
Money waster — nation's woe. 

10 Vile seducer — joy dispeller, 
Peace disturber — blackguard's 

guest; 
Sloth implanter — liver sweller, 
Brain disturber — hateful pest. 

11 Utterance boggier — stench 

emitter, 
Strongmen's sprawler — fatal drop ; 
Tumult raiser — venom spitter, 
Wrath inspirer — coward's prop. 

12 Pain inflicter — eyes inflamer, 
Heart corrupter — folly's nurse ; 

Secret babbler — body maimer, 
Thirst defeater — loathsome curse. 

13 Wit destroyer — joy irapairer, 
Scandal dealer — foul-mouthed 

scourge ; 
Senses blunter — youth ensnarer, 
Crime inventer — ruin's verge. 

14 Virtue blaster — base deceiver, 
Rage displayer — sot's delight ; 

Noise exciter — stomach heaver, 
Falsehood spreader — scorpion's 
bite. 

15 Quarrel plotter — rage discharger, 
Giant conqueror — wasteful sway ; 

Chin carbuncler — tongue enlarger, 
Malice venter — Death's broad 
icay. 

16 Tempest scatterer — window 

smasher, 
Death's forerunner — hell's dire 

drink; 
Ravenous murderer — wind* pipe 

slasher, 
1^ Drunkard's lodgings meat, and 

drink. 



198 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

THE TEMPERANCE BRIDE. 

BY CHARLES M. MEE. 
Tune — " The Soldier's Tem\' 

1 From the haunts of sin he turned, 

With a glad and Ughtsome bound, 
His soul with fearful horrors spurned 

Its dark unhallowed ground. 
His heart with sorrow bled, 

To hear the drunkard's cries, 
And prayed that time might quickly shed 

Reform before their eyes. 

2 O'er a temperance fireside, 

A female pensive stood, 
A blooming, blushing bride, 

But shortly won and wooed. 
Oh ! who would wish to spurn 

The look of joy and pride, 
That greets a husband's safe return 

To his temperance fireside. 

3 Sure, none could leave a spot 

Where temperance loves to dwell, 
To drink, carouse and sot 

Within some drunkard's hell. 
The most misguided man, 

Whose life must quickly end, 
By drink shorn to a span, 

Says woman's his best friend. 

IDA. L. 

WORDS BY C. A. S. 



2a 


• 1 


311 1311123 .4 


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1 1 5 1 tt 5 i 6 1 1. 1 j K 


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high the cup, and let it flow. With purest drink that earth can yield ; 
1 1 


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NATIOl.AL TEMPKUANCE SOxN'&STEK. 199 

IDA. Continued, 



2a 


.13 11 13 2 13 1 13 


.1 


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1 15 1 1 i 1 6 5 j 


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2o 

2a 


To beauty's cheek it gives a glow, And decks the lilies of the 
1 1 1 


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2 In its pure wave no poison sleeps, 

To steal the reason, fire the brain 
It never makes the orphan weep, 
Nor soils the hero's wreath of fame. 

3 From bubbling brook and mountain free. 

It brightly flows, 'tis freely given ; 
Fill high the cup, I'll drink to thee, 
A precious gift to man from heaven. 

4 The ruby wine may richly flow 

From luscious grape to tempt the eye; 
It has a false deceitful glow, 
Then touch it not — from danger fly. 

5 Then once again that nectar bring, 

Which heaven's goodness gives to man 
The bright drops of the sparkling spring, 
That I may drink to thee again. 



AMANDA. S, M. l. 

i I 12 3-3-5363 



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Did Christ o'er s 


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200 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

AMANDA. Continued, 

LOUD 



p /^ 

1PF5 531 12 34 5-32 


1 




A » » 1 7 6 9 1 9 1 9 


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6- 8 


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tential grief Burst forth from every eye— Burst forth from 


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2 The Son of God in tears 

The wondering angels see ; 
Be thou astonished, O my soul 

He shed those tears for thee — He shed, i&c. 



3 He wept that we might weep; 
Each sin demands a tear; 
In heaven alone no sin is found, 
And there's no weeping there — And there's, k,c. 



SING TO ME OF HEAVEN. 



IP 1 1 3-5332123- 



6-1^7 9 6 s5 I 6- I 9 9 9 > 9 9 I jj 

sing to me of heaven, TTheu I am called to die ; 

IP ^ 1 1 

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233 "" 9 9 9 9 ' '~~y 

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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 201 

SINU TO ME OF HEAVEN. Continued, 



Ip 3- 5 3 3 2 1 



I » » ^ » 9 7 I g 5 3 s5 I 6 9 3 s5 I 6« a 



23s 9 9 9 9 

Sing songs of ho - ly ec - sta - cj', To waft my soul on high. 
Ip 11 



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6- 





2 When cold and sluggish drops, 
Roll off my dying brow ; 
Break forth in songs of joy fulness, 
Let Heaven begin below. 



3 When my last moments come, 
Oh ! smooth my dying face ; 
And catch the bright seraphic gleam 
That on my features plays. 



4 Assembled round my bed, — 
Let one loud song be given, 
Let music cheer me last on earth 
And greet me first in Heaven. 



5 Then close my sightless eyes, 
And lay me down to rest, 
And clasp my cold and clammy hands 
Upon my lifeless breast. 



6 Around my lifeless clay 
Assemble those I love, 
And sing of Heaven — delightful Heaven, 
My glorious home above. 



202 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

AFFECTION. 



A 


1 


1 3 


4 


5 


2 


1 3 


4 


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that 


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the 


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gift were mine, 


to 


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pour in 


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song, 




E 


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tribute, 


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■wife, 


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thy worth and truth he 


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But tho' I strike a tuneless harp, and sing a simple strain, 

4a /^ 

B 2 I 1 1 4 4 } 2 2 2 3 I 1 1 | 1 

3c ' ' ' ' 9 9 7 7 5 ' 



6 5 4 315 4 2 2|345132 



40 



y 9 9 9 99 99 9 9 9 

'Tis love's own hand that sweeps the chord, and sweeps it not in 
4o ^ 



B r~|_4 2A1I215 |1 1 |«l |i 

3^ 9 9 9 9 ' 7 99 7 9 5 5 

2 O let us both, while life shall last, be to each other kind, 
Pursuing still our onward course, the same in heart and mind ; 

Tho' thorns around our pathway spring, yet slill the flowers will bloom, 
And mutual love shall light us through our darkest hour of gloom. 

3 And when our task on earth is done, and we are called to die, 
May we be found prepared to meat the summons from on higli. 
To be rejoined in realms above, and dwell on that blest shore, 
Where pain and sorrow never come, and death is felt no more. 

1). J S. 



THE CHRISTIAN VOCALIST. 203 

LA^J) OF REST. Austin Lane. 
2a 1-321 1- 



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20 






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dwell in peace at 


homo — And 


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SOFT. 






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dwell in peace 


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B 


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23c 



2 No tranquil joys on earth I know, 
No peaceful sheltering dome ; 
This world's a wilderness of woe, 
This world is not my homa. 



904 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER 



3 To Jesus Christ I fled for rest ; 

He bade me cease to roam, 
And lean for succor on bis breast, 
And he'd conduct me home. 

4 I should at once have quit this field, 

Where foes with fury foam ; 
But, ah! my passport was not sealed— 
I could not yet go home. 

5 When by affliction sharply tried, 

I view the gaping tomb, 
Although I dread death's chilling tide, 
Yet still I sigh for home. 

6 Weary of wand'ring round and round 

This vale of sin and gloom, 
1 long to quit th* unhallowed ground, 
And dwell with Christ at home 



THE BEOKEN PLEDGE. 



i. 



3p $ 


112 3- 


3- 


2 1- s5 6 6 s5 ©- 3 


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99 9 99 1 9 9 99 9 ^ || 


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With 
The 

3f $ 


smiles of beauty 
maiden, soft in 


on 
her 


her face. With heart that lightly tb^'^l^b'd, 
retreat, Where bloomed the fragrant Qow?^r ; 
11 1- 


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And 
Her 

3p 


decked in many a 

love to meet, in 

11 1- 


pleasing grace, In 

converse sweet, To 

1 P P 


many a 
pass the 


9 

virtue robed — 
twilight hour. 
KEP. 1 & 2s. 


C 7 


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came, the worthy cherished one — Dear to the maiden 
11 11 


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he had won ; 
p 




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99 9999 9 9 


9 9 9 





NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 205 



rSpp 1S36 5553 635 3 1 p 


A 6 I 9 9 9 9 ( 9 9 9 9 1 9 9 9 , j , -y g II 


2S 9 9 ~ 


And there he pledge! unceasing love, While pulse shall beat or passion moye. 


3p P 11 11 P 


C 6 1 (S69» 1 77761 96»6|3s5 6|( 


2s 9 9 9 9 9 9 ,,,,,- 



2 A care shade gloomed the mother's brow — 

Her heart beat heavily, 
With plaintive tone, like sorrow's moan, 

She sang^ her lullaby ; 
At midnight, when the storm was wild, 

While anxious deep concern 
Her bosom filled, and coldness chilled, 

She waited his return. 
He came, was yet the cherished one, 
Though wkom his fellow man would shun, 
A drunkard, and his lips now move 
To curse the one he pledged to love. 

3 She lay upon her dying bed. 

And felt upon her heart 
The hand of death, while struggling breath 

Told her she must soon depart; 
Yet he, to whom affections clung, 

Came not, nor stood beside ; 
Her heart, though young, with woe was wrung, 

When she 'mong strangers died. 
Rum drove the poisoned barbed dart, 
That pierced that warm devoted heart: 
Rum made the man a demon prove — 
'Twas this that broke the pledge of love. 



WHAT WE HATE. 

Air — " Old Arm Chair." 

1 We hate it, we hate it, and who shall dare, 
To chide us for hating the whisky and beer; 
We 've hated it long — we 've hated it well, 
And the reasons we hate it, we freely can tell. 
We hate it, because it has injured our health ; 
We hate it, because it has stolen our wealth; 
We hate it, because it has stolen our peace, 
Has marred all our friendship, and robbed us of eaie. 



206 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 We hate it, we hate it. and hope you may join 
Us ill hating the brandy, in hating the wine ; 
In hating it as an unprincipled thief, 

The cause of our losses, our sorrow, and grief. 
We hate it, because 'twas our father's foe ; 
We hate it, because 't was our mother's woe ; 
Because it has left on our relative's face, 
The deep burning lines of eternal disgrace. 

3 We hate it, because many fond hearts it breaks ; 
We hate it, because many orphans it makes ; 
We hate it, because it makes rich men to fail; 
We hate it, because it sends poor men to jail. 
Because 't is the curse of our free happy land ; 
We do hate it, therefore, and here take our stand, 
Not to use it, nor drink it, nor buy it, nor sell, 
While there's water in river, or cistern, or welL 



WHAT WE LOVE. 

Air — " Rockaioayy 

1 We love the clear cold water spring, 

We love the bright and sparkling wave; 
It is a healthy blessed thing, 

The drink our great Creator gave. 
No ! give us not the wine or beer. 
The ,rhisky, brandy, or the gin ; 
But give to us the water clear. 
In drinking it there is no sin. 
Oh ! we love, &c. 



2 Oh! how delightful 'tis to stroll 
Upon the golden sanded shore ; 
To mark the billows as they roil, 

To hear the dashing waters roar. 
It is a soul-inspiring sight, 

A token of our Father's love, 
And brings to our remembrance, bright, 
Sweet thoughts of that glad stream above. 
Oh! we love, &c. 



NATIONAL TEMPEEANCE SONGSTER. 207 

STRONG RUM. 

Tune — " Some Love to Roam,'^ p. 55. 

1 Some love strong rum, or ale's white foam. 

As it rises to be free ; 
And for right good cheer, some whistle beer. 

But the limpid stream for me. 
To the forest shade, or the mountain glade, 

So cheerily forth I go, 
To drink my fill at the gurgling rill, 

When the sun is shining low. 

2 In the stream I dip my burning lip, 

And the cooling draught pour in ; 
I ask no spring of brandy sling, 

Or of toddy made of gin. 
For what nature gave 1 only crave. 

The fount that gurgles free ; 
The greenwood trees, a cooling breeze, 

And a limpid stream for me. 



CHARLESTOWN. l. 

4(? 


A 132(123 s4|5iJ5|6531|4:-}*2 


2s 99 9999 9999 99 

We praise thee. Lord, if but one soul, While the past year prolonged its flight. 
4g 


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2s 99 9999 9999 99 

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Turn shudd'ring from the poisonous bowl. To health , and liberty, and lii:;h t. 

4a 

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23 9999 99 999999 

4a . 

B l|2211|2 s2 3 ITTT 1 I _ _ I" l~ii 

28 9 9 9 9 9 9 " '9 9 6 ~Y^!i. 5 



208 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 "We praise thee if one clouded home, 

Where broken hearts despairing pined, 
Behold the sire and husband come, 
Erect, and in his perfect mind. 

3 No more a weeping wife to mock, 

Till all her hopes in anguish end ; 

No more the trembling mind to shock, 

And sink the father in the fiend. 

4 Still give us grace, Almighty King, 

Unwavering at our posts to stand ; 
Till grateful at thy shrine we bring 
The tribute of a ransomed land. 



THE STAKS SINK ONE BY ONE FROM SIGHT, l 

|ip_ 

I A .6 1 1 2 I 3 s4 5 s5 I 6 6 5 s4 | .3 || .6 | 1 2\ 

|4s 6 7 6 7 

The stars sink one by one from sight, No trace of them we find. They vanish 

from the 



c 


.6 1 3 3 3 s5 1 6 


6 3 


314 4 2 s2| .3 II .6 1 3 3 3 s5 j 


43 

Ip 


B 


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Ip 


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brow of night J And none is left behind Mom, And none is left be - hind. 
Is P P 



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B 1 


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6 7 6 s5 6 7 85 .6 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 The sun goes to bis ocean bed, 

In all his rays enshrined; 

He wraps tbem round his crimson heafl^ 

And leaveth none behind 

To mourn, — 

And leaveth none behind. 

3 The beautified and gifted dead, 

The noblest of our kind, 
Have cast their works aside, aiid iied, 
And we are left behind, 

Alone, 
And we are left behind. 

4 The dear old friends of early times, 

Hearts round our hearts entwined, 
Have faded from us in their prime. 
And we are left behind 
To mourn, 
And we are left behind. 

5 O ! dear ones, teach us so to run 

Our race in sun and wind, 
That we may win when ye have woo. 
Though we be left behind 

Awhile, 
Though we be left behind. 



THE lYY GEEEN. 



209 



4G 


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A 


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old, 


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dainty plant is the 


9 9 

ivy green, That 


9 9 

creepeth o'er ruins 
1111 




D 


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9 9 


9 9 









4o /^ ^ 

^ ^■" i i 1 1 1 1|222 1 21335 5 21 >3"" || 

I4c" 9 ^ '79 9 9 > > 

14 



210 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

4a /-N 1 P 

A 5» 3 I 1 1 1 2 3 I 4 4 4 3 s4 I 5 3 - 2 | ,!■ 



Of right choice food are his meals, I ween, In his cell so lone and cold, 
4o /^ 1 1 P 



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A 1 I 1 1 3 I 5 5 5 1 I 1 2 3 I .4- 



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The walls must he crumbled, the stones decayed, To pleasure his dainty whim. 
4g 111 /^ 



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And the mouldering dust that years hare made, Is a merry meal for him ; 
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9 9 9 9 9 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 211 

4g .^^ 1 1 3 3- 2 .1 



Creepingj Creeping, Creeping where no life is seen, A rare old plant is the ivy 

green. 



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2 Fast he stealeth, though he wears no wings, 

And a staunch old heart has he , 
How closely he twineth, how tight he clings 

To his friend, the huge oak tree ! 
And slily he traileth along the ground, 

And his leaves he gently weaves, 
As he joyously hugs and Ci'awleth around 

The mould of dead men's graves: 
Creeping where grim death has been, 
A curious plant is the ivy green. 



3 Ages have fled, and their works decayed, 

And nations have scattered been ; 
But the stout old ivy shall never fade, 

From his hale and hearty green. 
The brave old plant, in his lonely days, 

Shall fatten upon the past ; 
For the stateliest building man can raise. 

Is the ivy's food at last: 
Creeping on where time hath been, 
A very- strange plant is the ivy greenu 



212 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

MAMANNA IN THE WEST. 

j2q $ iT^ 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 3 2 



A 5 I yy i 6" 7 I I 5 5 I i 9 ? I 



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With turrets flanked against the sky, And windows shining in the day, 
The braye old homestead rises high, A - boye the broad and shaded way. 



2a $ 
























REP. 


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9 
















REP. 


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A_ 3 4 I 5 5 s4 I 5 I 5 5 j j g ^|4 42|4 s4 5|6s4|5 34| 
The rippling brooklet sings along,'Mong mossy banks thickset with flowers, Aif .' 

26,^111 111 /^12 1/--N 



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arch • ing yines and shady bowers, Are vocal with the wild bird's sonj 



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NATIONAL TEMPERANCK SONGSTER. 



213 



2o 


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And joyously she tuned her lay 
2g 


9 9 

, " The dark dark night has passed 


away 


9 9 
,The 


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2c 9 
glorious 
2g 


> 
day 


9 9 

of hope 


9 9 

has come, I hail again 


? 5 

the light of home. 


D 5 


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7 7 

2 The wild sweet briars on either side, 

Like old familiar friends appear ; 
The old farm gate is swinging wide, 

A welcome to the traveler. 
The queenly rose, the lily white, 

The clematis and eglantine, 

And thousand sights and sounds combine, 
To fill her bosom with delight; 

Then merrily she tuned her lay. 

'• The gloomy night has passed away, 

I hail again the light of home, 

When I no more shall live forlorn." 

3 She heard the lark at heaven's gate, 

Her matin song devoutly sing, 
And chattering to his dark-eyed mate, 

She heard the swallow on the wing. 
Zephyr was redolent of sweet, 

And music dwelt in every sound : 

All things on earth, in air, ai'ound, 
Conspired to make her bliss complete. 

(). merrily she tuned her lay, 

'• The night is pass'd, and comes the day, 

A ad I shall cease to be alone, 

To walk forgotten, and live forlorn,' 



2l4 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE S0NG?5TER. 

4 The day had rounded to the west ; 
She heeded not the passing thne: 

By very happiness oppressed, 
She sank in revery sublime : — 

And musing on sweet nature's charms, 
She slept, and dreamed of him once more, 
And that he loved her as of yore : 

She woke, and found her in his arms. 
And then they sang a merry lay, 
" All doubt and fear has pass'd away, 
"We revel in the light of home, 
No more, no more abroad to roam." 



THE ANGELS' WHISPER. 

7q ^ rN_ 

I t 1 j .^ 1231it3|4 3 2345 31 

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A baby was sleeping, its mother was weeping, For her husband was far on the 
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wild 


raging 


sea, 


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tempest 


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swelling 


'round 


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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 215 



70 



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fisherman's dwelling. When she cried, " Dermofc, darling, come back to me." 
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2 Her prayers while she marmured, her baby still slumbered, 

And smiled in her face as she bended her knee : 
" O, blessed be that warning, my child, thy sleep adorning, 
Now I know that the angels are v/hispering to thee. 

3 " And while they are keeping bright watch o'er thy sleeping, 

O, pray dearest baby, pray softly with me, 
And say thoa wouldst rather they'd watch o'er thy father, 
For 1 know that the angels are whispering to thee." 

4 The dawn of the morning saw Dermot returning, 

The wife brought with joy her babe forth to see , 
And closely caressing her child, with a blessing 

Said, " I knew that the angels were whispering to thee. 



THE MOUNTAIN SPRING. 



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230 5 9 9 9 9 9 9 7 

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The spring on the mountiia side, And a streamlet running free, 



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216 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



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And 
But 


the fresh brook's murm'ring tide. Shall fill the cup for me. 
a sweeter cup is mine, Which is fill'd from nature's store. 


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Some sing 


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the praise of wine, As drank by 


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the gods 


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Of 


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2 A draught from the sparkling spring, 

That runs through the vales below, 
Where the v/ild lark loves to sing, 

And the purest w^aters flow 
Through the banks of choicest flowers, 

Where the rills, like childhood's dream, 
In infancy's young hours, 

Mingle with sweets, its stream. 

3 How clear is the cooling stream ; 

And fresh as the breath of morn; 
And its shining crystals gleam, 

Like dew-drops on the thorn. 
By the summer winds are borne 

Its evening mists, that rise 
To Heaven, but to return 

With fragrance from the skies. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

COTTAGE HOME. 



217 



•4g 



1|3 5 5- 6|5 3 !■ 2|3 3 2« 1|2- 1|3 5 5- 6j 



2c 



I had a dream the other night, When all around was still, I thought I saw my 
The grass plot green before the door, The porch with vines o'ergrown, Were 

loTely as they were 



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cottage white, Upon yon flowery hill. Oh ! rumseller, that home, 
before, When all was yet my own. 


that home of 


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That pleasant heme, that happy home, That cottage 


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home was mine. 


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218 NATIONAL TEMPEEANCS SOKGSTER. 

3 The gravel walk, so white and straight. 

With flowery banks beside, 
That led down to the wicket gate 

Where Willie used to ride. 
The locusts o'er the path that grew, 

The willow boughs that swayed, 
All told me with a tale most true, 

That there my Mary played. 

3 The silver lake, so calm and clear, 

Along whose bank I've straj^ed 
So often with my Lucy dear, 

To watch the sunlight fade. 
The murmuring streams that sweetly ran 

The garden's foot along, 
And sparkling fount as bright as then, 

All sang the mournful song- 

4 Now, that loved wife has gone to rest, 

In death her heart is bound 
Her babes are sleeping on her breast, 

Beneath yon grassy mound : 
And I am wandering lone and strange — 

No master of my will ; 
My home, my happy home is changed, 

To a hut behind the still. 

Oh ! rumseller, &c. 



THE CAPTIVE KOTGHT. 



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Twas a trumpet's pealing sound, And the knight looked do^n from the Paynim'8 

tower, And a 
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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 219 

THE CAPTIVE KNIGHT. Continued, 



6g 



A I 2 4 I 1 1 1 I .1 .R I 5» 3 >3 I 

43 5 5 5 5- 5 5 5-5 7 9 

9 9> 9 99 

Christian host, in its pride and power, Through the pass beneath him wound. 

Cease awhile, 

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clarion, clarion wild and shrill, Cease, let them hear the captive's voice, he 

still, be still ! 


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2 I knew 'twas a trumpet's note, 
And I see my brethren's lances gleam, 

And their pennons wave by the mountain stream, 

And their plumes to the glad wind float. 

Cease awhile, &c. 

3 I am here with my heavy chain ! 
And I see a torrent sweeping by, 
And an eagle rushing to the sky, 

And a host to its battle plain. 
Cease awhile, &lc. 

4 Must I pine in my fetters hero, 

With the wild wave's foam, and the free bird's flight, 
And the tall spears glancing on my sight, 
And the trumpet in my ear? 
Cease awlrile, <Sc.c. 



220 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGBTEB. 

THE CAPTIVE KNIGHT. Continued, 

IP 11-11 1111 1 2-22 33343 2 1 

' A 6- 7 I » ^> 7 I .6 .R I ^ ^ 7 ? I ^ R I 9 9 9 ? > 9 I 

4s » '» ' 

i They are gone, they have all passed by, They in whose wars 

I I had borne my part , They that I loved with a 

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brother's heart, They have left me here to die ! Sound again, clarion I 
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clarion pour thy blast ! Sound, for the captive's dream of hope is past. 

1? .^s 1 /-N 



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REMEMBRANCE. 



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Oh, no, I'll 


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never 


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drink a 


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The 


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cup I'll never take ; 

REP. 


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That poison 
6g $ 


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I will 


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never 


taste, 


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for old friendship's sake ; 

REP. 


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NATIONAL TEJklPERANCE SONGSTER. 



6a 








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From shop to shop they beckon 

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They hope they'll get me 


yet; 


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And 

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brandy 


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freely 


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offer 


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me, They think that I'll for 
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2 With shame I blush to view the scene, 

That I so oft did see ; 
As with the tippler I have been — • 

But they '11 find a change in me. 
'Tis time that I have drunk ray last — 

My cheeks with tears are wet ; 
To think of follies of the past, 

Oh, how can I forget ! 



3 They tell me I 'm unhappy now — 

I never was so gay ; 
And hint that I '11 forget my vow, 

But I heed not what they say. 
Through life I now will press my course, 

Until my sun is set, 
And bless the hour I took the pledge — 

Oh, how can I forget ! 



222 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

THE POISONOUS BOWL. 



4o 






A 3- 4 1 5 5 i 5 


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Oh, the ruby wine 
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All in vain shall shine, As it offc has shone before 


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And the rum display, 

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Its sparkling ray, But I '11 drink of it no more. 




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No, I'll neyer drink again, For to me 'tis very plain, 

That the drinker nothing gains, But a ruined soul ; 



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Then a - way ! a - way ! Then away I a - way I 

Then away with the madd'ning bowl ' 

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2 Come avv^ay ! away ! 

And no longer stray, 
'Mid ihe riot and rum and strife ; 

And no longer roam, 

From your once loved home, 
And the joys of a peaceful life. 
Then come and sign the pledge, 
In the temperance cause engage ; 
And eternal warfare wage 

V^^'ith the poisonous bowl. 
And away! away! O away ! away! 

Away with the madd'ning bowl. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

FLOW GENTLY SWEET CROTOK 

BY MRS. V. R. A. 
Am— *' Indianapolis y p. 102. 

1 Flow g-ently, sweet Croton, among thy green trees, 
Flow gently, we '11 sing thee a song in th}' praise ; 
We love thy pure water, thy sweet silver stream, 
And here we would linger by moonlight's soft beam, 
The tide of intemp'rance has had its full sway, 
The wine cup we banish away, far away, 

Then come to old Gotham, our city of fame, 
We '11 sing of thy praises, sweet Croton, again. 

2 Thy crystal stream, Croton, how lovely it glides. 
And winds by the cot where contentment resides ; 
At evening we fain by thy green banks would stray, 
And lose in thy murmurs the toils of the day. 
Flow gently, sweet Croton, among thy green trees, 
Flow gently, sweet river, the theme of our lays ; 
O'er hills and o'er valleys thy bright water comes, 
To cheer and enliven our own happy homes. 



BRIGHT ROSY MORNING. 



6o $ 




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The meadows and fields ; 


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We "wake from sweet slumbers, And hail the new day. 



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224 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

2 Intemperance before us 

Is ready to fly, 
And quails at the chorus 

We raise to the sky ! 
Then follow, then follow, 

The cold water chase, 
Where pleasure and vigor 

And health all embrace. 

3 The day's work when over, 

Makes the blood circle right — 
The cold water lover 

Sweet rest finds at night — 
Then let us all life enjoy, 

In this cold water way, 
And peace crown our nights, boys, 

As joy crowns our days. 



OUR FATHER. 

Air — " Columbia^' p. 113. 

Our Father— God above! 
Spirit of Truth and Lovo 

Whom all adore! 
On us thy Spirit send, 
Prove each a faithful friend, 
And may this cause extend 

From shore to shore ! 



THE SONG OF FREEDOM. 



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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 225 

THE SONG OF FEEEDOM. Continued. 



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225 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

THE SONG OF FEEEDOM. Continued. 

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2 The stars are free : 'tis freedom's light 

They poar upon the sod : 
'Tis falsely said that by golden chains 

They're bound to the throne of God. 
Heav'n will not, and earth cannot check 

Their march of liberty : 
So they shine and gleam forever on : 

O, the glorious stars are free. 

3 Free are the clouds: they frown in wrath, 

And thunder as in ire, 
"When for one moment round them gleami 

The lightning's chain of fire. 
And free the wind : it'speedeth on 

With none to stay or bind : 
The very soul of liberty 

Thou art, O cheering wind ! 

4 And free the trees — the forest trees i 

They tower in freedom high, 
And stretch their long, unfettered arms, 

In free(fom to the sky. 
And freely spring and freely bloom 

The sisterhood of tiowers : 
They print the name of liberty 

All o'er this world of ours. 

5 They freely send their perfumed praise 

To Him who formed them thus : 
They meekly bow their heads to heaves* 
Bet never bow to us. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 227 

O, tbey would shrink, and gasp, and die, 

As at the breath of storms, 
Should we throw the shadow of a chain 

Around their fragile forms. 



6 Forever free, in calm and storms, 
Is ocean, strong and wild: 

Should all the fetters — all the chains 
Of the world be on him piled, 

One single throb of his mighty breast- 
One toss of his snowy main, 

They'd break like threads of goss&,mer, 
And he is free again. 



And free the stream — the silver stream. 

That laugheth in the sun: 
It foams, it sparkles, then it gleams, 

As it rolls in freedom on. 
And free the birds : on freedom's wing 

They speed the wide world o'er, 
And joyfully on freedom's air 

Their songs of freedom pour. 

' The soul is free — the heaven-formed soali 

All triumph as 'tis heard ! 
The soul ! life, God, eternity. 

Are in that fearful word! 
The soul, unto whose winged thoughts, 

O wonderful ! 'tis given 
To roam through nature's vast domains, 

And upward mount to heaven. 

' And free the heart — the human heart: 

Let its throbbing pulse be heard, 
How it beateth, beateth, beateth free, 

Like to a mountain bird. 
And free are all its hopes and fears, 

Its faith that points above, 
And free its holy gratitude. 

And. freer than all, its love. 



228 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

HAPPY AND FREE. 



/^-N 



A 12|312333|43 2 11| 3151 1|322| 

23s 99 99 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 7 9 9 

9 

A - way, a - way with the sparkling wine. 

And burnished cup from the golden mine ; 



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slake my thirst at the clear cool spring, 

And bless the fount as I drink and sing : 


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Oh, water I pure water ! Gire water to me, And I will be merry 
6o And happy and free. 


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NATIONAL TEMPJERANCE SONGSTEK. 2^^ 

2 I oft have been where the wine flowed high, 
And laughing mirth and the song passed by ; 
Where men grew wild, and their bosoms beat 
With angry thoughts from the red wine's heat- 
Oh, water! cool water! 

Drink water all ye, 
And then you '11 be merry 
And happy like me. 



3 My brow is cool and my limbs are strong, 
And all is well as it erst was wrong ; 
My wife now smiles, and my babes will run 
To greet me back, whom they once would aivan 
Oh, water! pure water! 

Give water to me, 
For now I am merry 
And happy and free. 



4 How bright is home since the change came o'er. 
Where grief had dwelt in its weeds before 
The spell is broke and the tempter fled, 
And sorrow gone in the way he sped. 
Oh, water! blest water! 

The fountain for me, 
That I may be merry 
And happy and free. 



5 A sweeter joy is around me there, 
Than can be here, though wine is fair ; 
Their tones are swift, and the winning sniilo 
Of love at ease will each care beguile. 
Oh, water ! pure water! 

Give water to me. 
And I will be merry. 
And happy and free. 



6 Oh, pledge no more with the foaming wine, 
Nor bow again at old Bacchus's shrine ; 
For serpents lurk in that golden bowl. 
Whose sting is death to the heart and houI : 
But water! pure water! 
Pledge water with me, 
And let us be merry, 
And happy and free. 



230 



^^ATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



TRUTH. 

So7ig of the Despoiled 



6a$ ,^^ 



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Now, Nancy dear, look down my throat, And tell me if you see 
My wagons and my teams, my love, And my plantations three. 



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! I hope you will not ask Me 


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to look there a - gain. 




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No, no, dear John, I nothing see, But a red, scorched, seething lane ; 



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2 Why, Nancy love, my cattle, hogs, 
And sheep have all gone down 

That same red lane, and I believe 

1 could drink up a town. 
But as I've nothing more to drink, 

Of course I'll drink no more ; 
Better stop now than never, love, 

I wish I'd stopped before. 

3 The Maine Law men have come 

to town, 
And asked of me to sign 
The prohibition law pledge, love, 
'Gainst brandy, beer, and wine. 



And as I love my darling babes, 
And wife, and neighbors too : 

I've joined this moral army, love, 
Of faithful men, and true. 

4 Oh, John, dear John, you give ine 

You've done a noble deed ; 
I have no fears of misery, 

Of violence and need. 
May choicest blessings ever rest 

On you, and on the men 
Who framed a law to give poor wives 

Their husbands back again. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 231 

LOYE. 



5o $ 








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GOOD NIGHT. 

1 Good night, good night to every one, 

Be each heart free from care , 
May every brother seek his liome, 

And find contentment there. 
May joy beam vi^ith to-morrow's sun, 

And every prospect shine — 
While vi'ife and friends laugh merrily, 

Without the aid of wine. 

2 May heaven defend the righteous cviose 

In which we are engaged, 
And give us strength, against the foe 

Unceasing war to wage. 
Let ''Prohibition" be the word, 

From Georgia unto Maine, 
And ''y^erserf /e" our motto bo, 

'Till we the law obtain. 



3 Part we in friend.<;hip ; as we meet, 

Each hour cements our baud; 
Soon pleased, again we here will greet, 

And grasp fraternal hand. 
As through life's treach'rous sea we sail, 

May fortune's smiles increase; 
In honor's bark, love swells the gale 

And wafts to ports of peaco. 



23^ 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



INVITATION, 



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\Ve are scattered, we are scattered 

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On mountains high and in the glens. And 
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Are speaking in all sounds we hear, " We meet on earth no more." 
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by the green hill side, Where'er we wander o'er the earth, 

The saddened tones of yoro, 
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2 We are scattered, from the school 

house, 
Wheie we romped in boyish play, 
And from the old brown homestead 

We have wandered far away; 
And through the wide, wide world 
we roam, 
And on the sea or shore, 
Tlie voices como to us agairi, 
•' We meet on earth no more." 

3 We meet no more, we meet no 

more — 
How sadly tolls the bell. 
How mournfully its cadences 
Upon the soft winds swell — 



6 5 4 3 

A sadness falls upon the heart 

We never felt before, 
As that still voice forever says, 

"We meet on earth no more." 

4 Hope beams upon the lonely 
heart, 
The word of God is qiven 
To win us from the path of sin. 

And turn our steps toward heaven. 
Where we shall meet the loved and 
lost 
Upon that golden shore, 
Where tears and sighing- never 
come. 
Whore parting is no ibovg. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



233 



FREEDOM. 



1 We come with holy gladness, 
To breathe oar songs of praise, 

Nor let one note of sadness 
Be mhigled with our lays ; 

For 'tis a hallowed story, 

This tiieme of freedom's birth : 

Our fathers' deeds of glory 
Are echoed roand the earth. 

2 The sound is waxing stronger, 
And thrones- and nations hear ; 

Proud man shall ru^e no longer, 
For God, the Lord, is near; 



And he will crash oppression, 

And raise the humble mind, 
And give the earth's possession 

Among the good and kind. 
3 And then shall sink the mountainSi 
. Where pride and power are 

crowned, 
And peace, like gentle fountains. 

Shall shed its pareness round. 
Oh God! we would adore thee, 

And in thy shadow rest : 
Our fathers bowed before thee, 

And trusted, and were bU\st. 



ONE GLASS MORE. 



/^^ 



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Stay, mortal stay, nor heedless thus Thy sure destruction seal. 

Within that cup there lurks a curse, 

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Which all who drink shall feel, Disease and death forever nigh, 

Stand ready at the door ; 



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And eager M'aifc to hear the cry, give me oue glass more I 

give me one ghiss more ! 

7g 

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£34 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



' 4-~3¥-ri IT" I 1 a 1 /^ i 1 3 i-. i r-N 1- -1 a 3 ! 



ig O 9 9 ,5- 6~6 9 9 76 5 '7 67 9 67 '' 

*^ ** 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 

give me one glass more ! And eager wait to hear the cry, 

give me one glass m ore I 



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' ^ 9 9 9 9 » 9 9 

2 Go view that prison's gloomy cells — 

Their pallid tenants scan ; 
Gaze — gaze upon those earthly hells, 

And ask when they began : 
Had these a tongue — Oh, man ! thy cheek 

Would burn with crimson o'er — 
Had these a tongue they 'd to thee speak. 

Oh, take not " 07ie p^lass more.'' 

3 Behold that wretched female form, 

An outcast from her home; ^ 

Crushed by aittiction's blighting storm, 

And doomed in want to roam ; 
Behold her ! ask that prattler dear, 

Why mother is so poor, 
He '11 whisper in thy startled ear, 

'Twas father's '' one glass more.' 

4 Stay, mortal, stay, repent, return ! 

Reflect upon thy fate; 
The poisonous draught indignant spurn, 

Spurn — spurn it, ere too late ; 
Oh, fly the alehouse's horrid din, 

Nor linger at the door, 
Lest thou perchance should sip again, 

The treacherous " one glass more.'' 



(la 








WALLACE. 








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beneath whose genial sun 


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Deeds of valor have been done — 

Slavery crushed andtreedom won - 
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NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 235 

WALLACE. Continued. 
la 1 1 1 1 S 3- 



6 4 4 3 I 3- E- II f 7 I 9 17 7 7 



i Q 1 3 3 3 2 3 4 5- 2 2 2 1 

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All that's glorious gained : Holy men for thee have prayed, Truth with thee her 

la lit 111- 

B 4 4 4 2 I 1- R- !1 9 5 I 9 I 5 6 5 5 1 



230 



lo 1 2- 3 1 1 


D 7 9 I 9 7 9 j 3 4 5- 1 6 4 4 3 1 3- R- )j 


23c 9 5 9 
1g23 4- 5323 12 3- 1 


A 9 1 9 9 1 9 1 6 6 5 1 5- R- 11 


230 9 9 

home has made, Peace her charms has wide displayed, Right has proudly reigned, 
la 11 


B 5 5 6-1 9 5 5 1 G 6 3- 1 4 4 4 1 1 1- R- IJ 


23c 9 9 9 9 9 



2 Crownless Judah mourns in t,'loom — 
Greece lies slumbering- in the toiiib— 
Rome hath shorn her eagle piume, 

Lost her conquering name : 
Youthful Nation of the West, 
Rise ! with truer greatness bi^;.->i. 
Sainted bands from realms of ro;st, 

Watch thy brightening fame. 



3 Empire of the brave and freei ! 
Stretch thy sway from sea to sua : 
Who shall bid thee bend the kneo 

To a tyrant's throne ? 
Knowledge is thine armor bright. 
Liberty thy beacon light, 
God himself thy shield of miyht, 
Bqw to Him aiono. 



236 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



DOMESTIC BLISS. 



4s 


/-^ 


/-^ 


/^\ 


/^-N 




D 

23ci 


12|3334|3-1 


3 13 2 2 


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3 4|555 96|5-3 


5 1 5 4 4 


2 3 4 


6- 5 


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99 99 9 9 9 


9 9 9 


9 9 9 








Where "burns the fireside brightest, 


Cheer - ing the 


SO - cial 


breast ? 




4g 








/^\ 




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1 ; 1 1 1 1 1 ]- 1 


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9 9 9 


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23(i 99 99 



4g 



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2 I !■ B II 



23q 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 

Where beats the fond heart lightest, Its humble hopes possessed ? 

4a 



B 



1111 



1 1 



28a 



6a /^\ 


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D 1 1 12 


12 13-11 


1 1 2 


1 2 1 3- E II 


23q 9 7 9 9 
9 


7 9 9 9 
9 


7 9 9 

9 


7 9 9 

9 


4o ,^^ 


/-N 


/^N 


/^ 


A 3 1 2 3 4 


2 3 4 1 5- 3 3 


12 3 4 


2 3 4 I 5- R jl 


23q 9 9 9 9 


9 9 9 9 


9 9 9 


9 9 9 


Where is the 


hour of sadness. With 


meek-eyed 


patience borne, 


4«5 








B 1 1 


i 1- 1 1 


1 


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23q 9 5 5 


5 5 9 


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5 5 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 237 

DOMESTIC BLISS. Continued. 



4a /^ 












D 1»|3 3 3 4|3-11| 


2 


2 






|1- K 1 


23Q 99 »> 9 9 9 

4g /^ 1 




9 


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A 34|5 5 5 9 6i 5-331 


4 


4 


2 


2 


|1- R !i 


23(i 99 99 9 9 9 9 9 

Worth more than those of gladness. Which mirth's 

4a 


gay 


9 

cheeks adorn ? 


B l|llll{l-lli 










11- R jj 


l23Q 9 9 9 9 


5 


5 


5 


5 





4a 




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/^ 


/^^ 


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1 


1 1 


2 12 13-1: 


1| 1 2 


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4a 


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7 9 

9 


9799 

9 


9799 

9 


7 9 9 

9 


A 


3 


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3|2 3 4 


2 3 4 1 5- R Ij 


23q 

4a 


9 

Plea 


9 9 

- sure 


9999 
is marked by fleetness, 


9999 
To those who 


999 

ev - er roam, 


B 


1 


1 


|1- 1 


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2Sq 


9 


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5 5 5 


9 5 5 


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4a 


/^ 


















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1 2 


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4o 


99 99 




9 9 
1 




1 


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1 2 


9 
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1- 


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23q" 

4a 


3 4 

' 99 99 

While 


1 5 


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1 5- 




'1 


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7 


7 1 R U 


9 
grief it - self has 


sweetness, 


At home 


9 
, at home, sweet homo. 


B 


1 


1 1 


111 


1 1- 


1 


1 1 






11- E II 



23(i" 9 9 9 955 

9 

2 There blend the ties that strengthen 
Oar hearts in hours of grief — 
The silver links that lengthen 
Joy's visits when most briei< 



238 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 

There eyes, in all their splendor, 

Are vocal to the heart; 
And glances, bright and tender, 

Fresh eloquence impart : 
Then, dost thou sigh for pleasure ? 

O, do not widely roam; 
But seek that hidden treasure 

At home, at home, sweet home. 



3 Does pure religion charm thee 

Far more than aught below ? 
Would St thou that she should arm the© 

Against the hour of woe ? 
Her dwelling is not only 

In temples built for prayer; 
For home itself is lonely 

Unless her smiles be there : 
Wherever we may wander, 

'Tis all in vain we roam, 
If worshipless, her altar. 

At home, at home, sweet home* 



Tune on page 159. 

1 WHEN the heart is dejected. 

And pleasure is flown, 
And passed the bright moments 

So fondly our ov/n, 
And stilled is the music 

or nature and birds. 
How sweet to the bosom 

Are smiles and kind words. 



8 The fond heart is breaking 

In burniiig despair. 
While clothed in broad sackcloth 

Are skies that are fair, 
O, save ere it perish. 

The sorrowful mind, 
By smiles that are pleavSant, 

And v/nrds that are kind. 



KATTONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 239 

3 I've been to the palace 

Of the rich and the gay,— 
Where the syrens of pleasure 

Chase sorrow away — 
But never, O never. 

Such joys have I seen, 
As gush from the bosom, 

Where kind words have been. 

VENICE. 

REP. REP Is & '2a. , 

8a /^ /-N /-N 

1 I I " / -N /--. I II I i 113 3 2 2 111 "l! 



3(^3 354 40565432 .3 3 357 75 9959 7 

9 9 9 9 

Be firm and be faithful, desert not the right : 



A_l_ i l32|S4 3|43 21 |.1||1|135|5 13|55443J32 
3q 9997 7999999 

9 

The brave becomes bolder, the darker the night : Then up and be doing, though 

cowards may fail 

%(i REP. R EP . i & 2.S. 

b'^iTj 1 I ii ' I mill I I i i( 

3q 555 455 .1 5551 111 .5 

Thy duty pursuing, dare all, and prevail. 

2 If scorn be thy portion, if hatred and loss, 
If stripes and if prison, remember the cross ! 
God watches above thee, and he will requite : 
Desert those that love thee, but never the right. 



LOYE AT HOME. 



2o 



1 I !■ 1 3 I 3-r~ 4 3 1 I 3- 1 3- 



T~\ 3« 2 1 I 6 5 3 15-3 3 I .2* 



4Q » 

The earth has treasures fair and bright, Deep buried in her cayen, 

B FTi- 1 1 1 I 1- i"'i~"T~QEiriZE3IlLZZriJ 

_ — I ^ , , , .5, 



240 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

LOYE AT HOME. ContinuecL 



-23 


1 










/^N 




B 


1- 13 


1 3- 


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1 


1 


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1 


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And 


9 

ocean hideth 


many 


9 

a gem. With his 


? 9 

blue 


99 99 

curl - ing 


waves ; 


B 


1 1 


1-111 


1 1- 


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5- 5 





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Yet 


not 


within her 


bo - som dark, Or 'neath the dashing 


foam, 




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1 1 


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Lies there a treasure 


e - qual - ing A world of love at 


home. 




2a 
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1 1 


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2g 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCK SONGSTER. 241 

2 True sterling happiness and joy- 

Are not with gold allied ; 
Nor can it yield a pleasare like 

A cheerful, bright fireside. 
I envy not the man who dwells 

In stately hull or dome, 
If 'mid his splendor he hath not 

A world of love at home. 

3 The friends whom time has proved sincere, 

'Tis they alone can bring 
A sure relief to hearts that droop 

'Neath sorrow's heavy wing. 
Though care and sorrow may be mine, 

As down life's path I roam, 
I'll heed them not while still I have 

A world of love at home. 



THE COUNTRY. 



D 


1 1111 1 


1 1 1 


3 1 3 1 2 1 


1 i 1 




!I 


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> 7 7 ' 




1 /-^ 


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1213 3 3 2 1 


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4q99 99 9999 

O let the country be my home ! let me there in freedom roam ! 

2a 

B 1|1111|1111|1 1 _|_ !( 

4q 5 5 5 5 5 

2g ^^^ /"N /"^ /^ /'^v /-^ /"^ 



D 1 11 12 1 I jl 3 3" 4|5 432432 4j3 1 1 

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9 9 

/-N /^-S /-~N 

2g ^-^ /^N z*-^ 1-2321 2 1 .^-N 



A 1 2|3 3 4 321| 3 5 9 j 9 9 9 7 9 97 6 | 5 3 3_|| 

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There let me live— there let me die—There let my ash - es tranquil lie. 

2g ____^ 

\""T'"r~i T" I i 1 \« I 1 1 I_ [ili~0 

^^■r' ' " 55 5"" " '4 5 " 



242 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER, 

THE COUNTRY, Continued. 



2o 


/--N ^-N 


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"l 2r3131!S3 34j31 3a3i4 | 


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The country is my heart's delight, So calm and iftill, so clear and bright 


2o 




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There life is pure, there life is sweet, There honest hearts in friendship meet 


2g 


p 


B 


-XT 11 1111-111 lillfi 


4q 


5 5 5 4 5 



2 There birds of summer chant their lays, 
There happy flocks on meadows graze : 
Thore silvery streams and rippling rills, 
In beauty flow amidst the hills. 

The country is, &c, 

3 There flowerets bloom of every hue, 
And smile beneath the morning dew; 
There verdure crowns the mountain height, 
And twinkling stars are clear by night. 

The country is, &c. 

4 'Tis there amidst the silent grove, 
I love in summer days to rove, 

And seek the cave, and seek the glea. 
Afar from every human keu. 
The country is, &c. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 243 

»5 There stiff constraint and custom's round, 
And heartless smiles are never found : 
There life from vicious arts kept free. 
Is fraught with vs^orth I love to see 
The country Is, &c. 



TRUE BLISS. 



9l9 
























I) 


1 
















1- 


1 


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4q 
f7g 


3 

9 


5- 


6 5- 

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4 

9 


3- 


4 4- 

9 


4 

9 


3- 


3 

9 


9 


•7 



3- 4 3- g I 1- I 3- 1 I ,2 B* ll 



4q 5 9 9 6 6-65-5 » 

9 9 9 9 

A blooming rose in summer time. Is beautiful to me, 

f7q ^ 

?I__i i 1- 1 i" I I L-.__R^Zfi 

4q ^ ' 5 6- 4 4- 4 1- 1 1- 1 .5 



f7q 












p 






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3 

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P 


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3- 4 


3- 2 


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j?lorious 


9 

are the 


6 6-7 

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many stars That 


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glitter 


9 

on the 
p 


sea, 




B 


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1- 1 


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244 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

TEUE BLISS. Continued. ♦ 

via 

4(i 9 7. 6 7- 9 4 4-43-3 ? 



j A 3 I 2- 1 2- 3 I 4- I 1 3- 1 I .2 R- ii 

4q ? 9 9 6 6-65-9 9 



But gentle -words and lov - ing hearts, And hands to clasp my own, 



;p7c» 



B__j I I i R- y 

|4q i 5-5 5-5 4- 4 4- 4 1-11-1 ,5 



3- 2 1- 



4a 9 9 5 3-44-43-37-5 .3 

9 9 9 9 9 

f7g P P 



3 I 5- 4 3- 2 I 1- 4- I 



4a 9 9 9 6 6 5-5 9 

9 9 9 

Are better than the brightest flowers. Or stars that ever shone. 



ifiG 



B 1 I 1- 1- I ! 



Ug 9" 7 5 5-4 4-4 1-15-5 

9 9 9 9 9 9 

2 The sun may warm the grass to life, 

The dew the drooping Hower, 
The eyes grow bright, and watch the light. 

Of Autumn's opening hour. 
But words that breathe of tenderness 

And smiles we know are true, 
Are warmer than the summer time, 

And brighter than the dew. 

S It is not much the world can give, 

With all its subtle art, 
And gold and gems are not the things 

To satisfy the heart ; 
B'dt, O, if those who cluster reund 

The altar and the hearth. 
Have gentle words and loving smiles, 

How beautiful is earth! 



NATION' AL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

A DIRGE. 

BT ELIZABETH M. ROBERTS. 



245- 



4<3 


























A 5 


3 


1 


1 


1 


3 3 3 


3 


1 4 


4 4 3 


6 


5 


5 5 1 3 1 


6 5 1 


3s ' ' » 9 

Sweetly unbroken be thy rest, 

4q 


9 9 9 9 9 9 

No troubled dreams disturb thy breast ; No sha. 
dowy thought ma 


G 3 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 i 




1 


3 


3 3 


3 


3 


3 3 111 


4 5 



7 7 7 



4g 



B 1 i 1 1 1 1 I IJ I 1111 111 

83 99 555 666569 69 

9 9 9 9 9 ? 



4a 




1 1 






p p 




A 


6 7 


1 


7 6 5 5 


6 


s4 5 5 i 3 


1 J. II 


Ss 


9 9 




9 9 


9 


9 ? 


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darken 


now, The 


marble stillness 


Of 


thy brow,— Sweet be thy rest 


4g 










p p 




C 


4 s4 


5 6 1 


5 4 3 3 


4 


3 3 3 j 1 


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9 9 




9 9 


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B 


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2 Soft be thy sleep ! — the evening air, 
Plaj'^s not amid thy sunny hair — 

Thy pale hands, litte a moonlight-cloua — 
Folded amid thy snowy shroud — 
So pale and fair. 

3 No sound of grief is round thy bed, 
But when at eve, with gentle tread, 
A pensive step thy pillow nears, 
The little mound is bathed in tears 

Above thy head. 

4 And oft the wind harps on the bough, 
In troubled murmurs sad and low, 
Steals oat o'er midnight's shadows deep, 
'Plaining above thy lonely sleep, 

A r«quiera low. 



246 KA.TIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

5 Peace to thy slumbers, gentle one, 
And ti!l life's wearied course is run. 
Thy voice shall guide me, when I pray, 
Teaching my burthened heart to say, 
"Thy will be done! '' 



THE TEE-TOTALLER'S WAR WHOOP. 

Air — '* Wallace." p. 234. 

1 Tee-tot'lers now make a stand, 
Be united hand in hand, 

Form your ranks, and do demand 
The grog-sellers should flee. 

2 Let them know 'twas made to kill, 
Let them know 'twill cure no ill. 
Let them know the murdering still 

Shall pay the debt it owes, 

3 Hear the orphan children cry, 

Fight on, fight on, through them we die 
Weeping mothers screaming high, 
Save! Oh save ! Oh save! 

4 Now we '11 take them in their might, 
Let us one and all unite, 

And sign the deed this very night, 
To put the rum-shops down. 

5 From the boose the demon turn, 
They sink, they fire, destroy and burn, 

' Fight on, my boys, 'tis now our turn 

To give them back their change. 

6 Who has not laid within the grave 
Some kind relation, good and brave, 
Murdered by a poisonous knave, 

Who kept a rummery ? 

7 Two masters ever we despise, 
The devil's one before your eyes , 
Friends of temperance, all, arise, 

God and the temperance cause. 

8 Every strife and every woe. 
From intemperance mostly flow ; 
And tt? the d^use the world do owe, 

The sbui'ce of ev^ery cfime. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



247 



'TIS BUT A DROP„ 

'Tis but a drop, the father said. 

And .^ave it to his son ; 
But little did he think a work 

Of deatli was thus begun. 
The drop that lured when the babe 

Scarce lisped his fathers name, 
Planted a fatal appetite 

Deep in his infant frame. 
! 'Tis bat a drop, the comrades cried, 

In truant school-boy tone ; 
It did noi hurt us in our robes, 

It will not now we 're grown. 
And so they drank the mixture up. 

That reeling, youthful band ; 
For each had learned to love the taste 

From his own father's hand. 
I 'Tis but a drop, the luisband said. 

While his poor wife stood by, 
In famine, grief, and loneliness, 

And raised the piercing cry. 
'Tis but a drop — [ '11 drink it still — 

'Twill never injure me ; 
1 always drank — so madam, hush, 

We never can agree. 
'Tis but a drop — I need it now. 

The staggering drunkard said ; 
It was my food in infancy, 

My meat — my drink — and bread. 
A drop — a drop ! oh ! let me have ! 

'Twill so refresh my soul! 
He took it — trembled — drank — and died, 

Grasping the fatal bowl. 

THANKFULNESS. D. L, M. 



Ca 


















\D 


R 


/-^ 


1 


1 


1 1 


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1 1 


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3" 4 

There 


6 5 

seems a 


4 3 

voice in 


4: 4: 

every 


5 4 

gale, 


3 4 

A 


5 5 

tongue iu 


A 


K 


1- Z 


1 3 » 


1 it I 


1 » 2 1 


3 2 


1 2 


1 3 3 1 


50 


^ 


9 ?9 

Which 


tells, 


Lord, the 


wondrous 


9 9 

tale, 


9 J 

Of 


thy in- 


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1 


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iJ<i 



5 O 5 5 

An<i ?»11 tho mi;igli)ig Ft>unds of spring, To 



thc^e' 



248 NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

THANKFULNESS. Continued, 



6g 








P REP 


• /^ 




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A' 


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dul - 


gence, 


love. 


and power, 


The 


birds 


that 


rise 


on 


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9 9 9 9 
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REP. I & 2s. 


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quivering wing, Ap - pear 


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to hymn 


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their Ma - 


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ker's praise, 

REP. 1 & 23. 


B 


1 1 1 1 111 


1 i 1 


1 1 


1 !1 


12(4 






4 


4 .5 



2 And shall my voice, Great God, alone, 

Be mute 'midst nature's loud acclaim? 
No, let my heart with answering tone, 

Breathe forth in praise thy holy name. 
And nature's debt is small to miue, 

Thou bad'st her being bounded be, 
But — matchless proof of love divine- - 

Thou gav'st immortal life to me. 

3 The Saviour left his heavenly throne, 

A ransom for my soul to give ; 
Man's suffering state he made his own, 

And deigned to die that I might live. 
But thanks and praise for love so great, 

No mortal tongue can e'er express ; 
Then let me, bow-ed before thy feet, 

In silence love thee, Lord, and bless. 



NATIOiS^AL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 249 

THE UNION. 

flo_/2N ^ .0__ *_ 12 3 2 1 

|p_ 33|3 3 »333 3 1 5 5» 5 5 5 5 | 9 y 9 9 9 9 | 

|4q " 9 9 ~ 9 99 9 9' 9 99 9 9 9 

I 

iG /^ 1 1-11 /^ 2 %■ 2 2/^^ 323 4543 

'^ 5 5 I > ^» "5 5 I » 9^ 5 5 I 9 » » > ^ M 

'4q' 9 9 9 9 9 9 

I rrom the norf:h to the south , we are linked in each part, Whatsyer our faith 
! or our 

Ig /-^ ^ /^ /-> 

^ A i 1 i 1 1^ 1 1 1 1 I 5 5- 5 5 5 5 i 1 111 1 1 { 

4q99 9 99 99 9 99 99 99 99 



,lG /^ 


/-^ .^ 


;D 7 7- 7 7 II 5 5 1 3 3- 3 3 


3 3 1 5 5- 5 5 5 5 1 


i4Q 9 99 9 9 9 99 


9 9 9 99 9 9 


llG 2 2- 2 2 /-N 11-11 


,^ 2 2- 2 2 /-^ 


|A 9 " II 5 5 1 » " 


5 5 1 ' " 5 5 i 


iiQ ' 9 


99 99 


1 interest may be ; And our S3-mpathies chord like the throb of one heart, Dis- 


jla .-^ 


^^ /^^, 



jB 5 5- 5 5 i! 5 5 jll- 1 1 lt|5 5 - 5555 

i4(i "» '' ' ' 9 99 9 9 9 99 9 9 



ilo -13 2 



ij) 9 " 9~ "9 5 3 2 1 I 3 3- 3 3 II 5 5 I 5 5 6 7 7 ^ ( 

;4q 9 99 9 99 99 99'9 

i .-^ ' ^ 

.'^'L ^__^J* _^ 1 /^ 11 -11 /^ 1 2 2_3_ 

•\ '» 9 9' 9 " 7 7 I 9 99 II 5 6 j 7 7 » > » 

:4q "■ 9 ' " "9 9 " > 

tinct as the billows, but one as the sea. We are firm in our cause we are 

Il6_^ ^ '^^ , ^ 

! b l" 4 4 5 5 5 I 1 1 -__ t 1 II 5 5 I 5 5 5 5 5~ 5_ | 

(4q 9 9 9 9" ~r 99 ' "99' 99 9 "> 



250 ITATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 

THE UNION. Continued. 

Iq 8 2* 2 2 .^ li t 

Id 9 " 5 5 3 3 5 > > I 7 y« 7 7 II ft 5 



Iq 4 4" 4 4 /-N 112 3 3 4 5 5 -55 

X - V~ 99 5 5 I ^ '> ^ M "9 ^> ~ II 5 5"! 



4q ' ^ ' ' 

true to our land, A cause and a land all glorious and free ! We're 

lO ,--N 1 1 1 1 1 



5 5- 5 5 7 7 1 > 9 9 fi I 5 5- 5 5 |i 5 5 I 



4<i 



lo 






/-N 


13 2 /-N 


D 


3 3-33 


3 


3 15 5-5555 


9 9 9 5 3 2 2 13 3-331! 


4q 
1g 


9 99 
11-11 


9 


9 9 99 9 9 

2 2-22/^ 


9 9 9 9 99 

3 5 4 2 1/^ 11-11 


A 

4o 


9 99 


5 


5 1 » " 5 5 


1 9 9 9 9 7 7 1 9 99 •{ 




9 


9 9 9 


9 9 



united in heart and united in hand, Distinct as the billows, but one as the sea. 

ilo /^ ^^21- 

1^ 11°1 1J^1|^^"^5^^I^^^ 5 5 5|li - i M 

4q 9 "99 9 9 9 99 99 99 99 9 99 

2 We honor the good, and we favor the just, 

We scoff at a despot, and scorn his decree ; 
In our union of states all firmly we trust, 

Distinct as the billows, but one as the sea. 
The poor and oppressed of each land and each isle, 

Clin here find a refuge from tyrants to flee ; 
The sunbeams of joy on our states ever smile, 

Distiiw^t as the billows but one as the sea. 

3 May famine and want never visit our land, 

But plenty our portion perpetually be ; 
May our states be upheld by industry's hand. 

Distinct as the billows, but one as the sea. 
O thou who canst glance from the east to the west. 

Ere a thought can conceive it, we pray unto thee — 
Preserve us in peace^ and keep us still bles% 

Distinct as the billows, but one as tlie sea» 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 251 

WEEP FOR THE FALLEN. 



6g 






1^1 1 II 




1 


1 1 


2q » 3 3 

6a 9 9 


5 5 5 5 5 5- si 

9 9 9 9 9 


4 54 

9 9 


5 s4 5 5 5 s4- 5 

9999 9 »» 


5- 


I> 1 1 1 


*2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 II 2 


222 


1 2 2 5 1 2 1- 


1 1 


2q 9 9 


799 9999 7 9 


9 9 


9 9 97 


7- 



6q ^-^ 



A 1 1 I 2 /^ I 3 2 3 4 I 3 2 || 1 | 1 j 1 2 3 | /^ | [ 



2q 59 55 9999 9 9 70 7999 76-55- 

999 999 9 99 

"Weep for the fallen, hang j'our heads iu sorrow, 
6g And mournfully sing the requiem sad and glow. 



I /^ |i 1 I II I I 112 I i 



2q113 557 9794550 05 2 5079 2-2 5- 

99 99 99 99 99 999 9 99 



,60 



!G R I 1 1 I 



2q9 79 555 550 5- 

9 9 9 9 9 

6g /^ . 



)D R 


5 5 5 


3 


1 1 


1 13 2 


2-1 li 


3 


3 


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3 


4 1 


I2Q 9- 

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9 9 




9 9 


79 9 9 

9 


9 997 

9 


9 


9 


9 


» 


9 


lA It 


5 4 3 


i * 


3 3 


12 3 12 


|. II 


1 


1 




1 


2 1 


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9 9 




9 9 


9 » » 9 


7-0 5 

9 99 9 


9 


9 


7 

9 


9 


» 



I Thousands have perished by the fell destroyer. weep for youth and 

I6g r~N SOFT. 



|B R I 3 2 1 I 111 



,__^ 9 9 -y-7 9 5 » 3 4 

9 99 

60 



2q 5 7 9 5 84 5 56 6 S 4- S S« 

i » » » 9 » 99 99 t »» 

iCo LOUD. /^*S 



D321|l 1 2 I 1 1|5|55 5 2 j 2 I I 1 i 1 1 I lyj 

2a 9 9 9799 7 99999 9 99 »9 7. 9» 

Go 9 9^ ^^ 

A"'i 3T^2 3 4 I 3 2 || 3 | 4_3 '2_IJ \ 2"T| 33* I jjfjl 

24 5^ ^9'9~9"*9 9 9 » 9 '♦ 9' 7 9 99 99 9 9» 

9 

boautv, weep for youth and beauty, weep for youth am! ho.iur>\ 
(>> " L0UI>. iu th<»j;rftT«» Inl.l l«> 

ij ""'.r"~" I >R r -R ri i'2~i T'^ I >^ I 

, ^ , , , 7 jj 513 11 i ft- « •• 

^ a • • • • •• It « 



262 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SONGSTER. 



2 Voices of wailing tell of hopeless anguish, 

While sorrowing mothers bid us on onward go ; 
Hark to their accents — they, the hroken hearted ; 
Who weep for youth and heauty, in the t^rave laid bw 



3 Hear how they bid us sound the timely warning, 
While yet there's hope to shun the cup of woe; 
For is it nothing, ye who see no danger, 
To weep for youth and beauty, in the grave laid low. 



4 Weep for the fallen ! but. in all your sorrow. 
Point to the Law that freedom can bestow; 
Rescue the nation from the fell destroyer, 
Oh, why should youth and beauty in the grave lie low ? 

MRS. DAn/L. 



COME, TO THE SUNSET TREE. 



7'u7ie on j^^^g^ 1'7, 



1 COME, to the sunset tree, 
The day is past; and gone, 

The woodman's ax lies low, 
And the reaper's work is done. 

The twilight star to heaven, 

- And the summer dew to flowers. 

And rest to us is given 

By the cool soft evening hours. 
Come, come, &c. 



2 Sweet is the hour of rest! 

Pleasant the heart's low sigh, 
And the gleaming of tlie west, 

And the turf whereon we lie. 
When the hurdea and the heat 

Of labor's task are o'er, 
And kindly voices greet 

The tired one at his door. 
Come, come, &c. 



.3 Yes: tuneful is the sound 

That dwells in whispering boughs, 
Welcome the freshness round, 

And the gale that fans our brows. 
But rest more sweet and still 

Than ever night-fall gave, 
Our longing hearts shall fill 

In the world beyond the grave. 
Come, come, &c. 



4 There shall no tempest blow, 

No scorching noon tide heat; 
There shall be no more snow, 

No weary wandering feet. 
And w^e lift our trusting eyes. 

From the hills our fathers trod, 
To the quiet of the skies, 

To the Sabbath of our God. 
Come, come, &c. 



INDEX TO FIRST LINES. 



A baby was sleeping, its motber, . 214 



A beiicon has been lighted, 
A child lay on her little couch, 
A dainty plant is the ivy green, 
America! my native clime, . 
Among the mountain trees, 
Are there tidings in yon vessel, 
Away, away with the sparkling, 
A way-worn inebriate, an exile, 

Be firm and be faithful, 
Before the altar stood, . 
Bird of the greenwood, 
Bury him there. 



187 
145 
209 
98 
66 
228 
153 
37 

239 
40 
151 
173 



Clime ! beneath whose genial sun, 234 

Come all ye friends of temperance, 36 

Come join the gallant, . . 135 

Come to the sunset tree, . . 252 

Come to the temperance hall, , 186 

Delay not, delay not, drunkard, 88 

Did Christ o'er sinner's weep, . 199 

Farewell mother,tears are streaming,152 

Farewell to the cup. we have, . 33 

Fill high the cup, and let it flow, 198 

Fly away to my native land, . 161 

Fly away to the promised landj . 163 

Flow gently, sweet Croton, . . 223 

Flow gently, thou tear drop, . 102 

For full five hundred years, . . 69 

Friends of freedom swnll the song, 132 

Friends of sweet and social glee, 35 

From morning's golden porrals, 184 

From scenes of confusion, . 35 

From the mountain-top and valley, 151 

From the haunts of sin he turned, 198 

From the north to the south, . 249 

Give sparkling cold water, . 183 j 

Go, go, thou that enslaves t me, . 125 

Good night, good night to every onO; 231 | 



Hail Columbia, happy land, . 142 

Hail liberty's birth- day, . . 156 

Hail the temperance reformation, 87 

Hurrah for the pledge, . . 107 

I'm all alone in my chamber now, 42 

I'm at home, I'm at home, . 76 

Idler! why lie down to die, . . 48 

I had a dream the other night, 217 
] love it, I love it. and who shall dare, 73 

I love to sing when I am glad, . 83 

In the tempest of life, . . 97 

I saw a youth in his lather's hall, 53 
I think when I read that sweet story, 78 

I've been a slave full long enough, 86 

I was to.'^sed by the winds, . . 54 

I wear not the purple, . . 133 

I'll sing you a modern ballad, . 185 

Land of Columbia, awake! . 90 

Let thy devotee extol thee, . . 197 

Life let us cherish. . . . 116 

Long may the temperance banner, 52 

Long time before my pledge, . 180 

Lord, from thy glorious throne, 113 

Love for the fallen weak, . . 177 

Merrily every bosom boundeth, . 174 
'Mid pleasures and palaces, . 121 
Mine is the fame most blazoned, 55 
My father once was bold and strong, 190 
My rest is in heaven my home, . 92 

Nay, come not to me, . . 182 
Nigh to a grave that was newly made, 90 

come, come away, . . . 155 

dear, what can the matter be, 191 

<ion't you remember, sweet Alice, 188 

do not drink again, papa, . 132 
0, it is not while riches and splendor, 120 

.Jesus, [ h.ave come to thee, . 169 

land of rest, for the* I jsi5;h, . 203 



254 



IKBEX TO TUNES. 



The bird at sea, 


. . 151 


The 


Tlie brav« old oak, 


. 107 


The 


The bride's farewell, 


. . 152 


The 


The broken pledge, . 


. 204 


The 


The call. 


. . 185 


The 


'i'he captlTe Kniglit, . 


218 




The carrier dove, . 


.- . 161 


The 


The country, 


. 241 




The crooked-necked gourd, 


. 80 


The 


The deep blue sea, . 


65 


The 


The departed, 


. 107 




The drink for me, 


195 




The drink of the free, . ■ 


. 183 


The 


The drunkard's grave. 


53 


The 


The ivy green , . . 


209 


The 


The last link is broken, 


85 


The 


The last rose of summer, 


169 


The 


The little boy that died, 


42 





I Mistletoe bough, . 
i mother's appeal, 
i mountain spring, . 
i night wind, 
} old arm chair. No. 1, 
" '' •' No. 2, 
5 old church bell, No. 1, 
" " •' No. 2, 

} old house at home,. 
J old Sexton, No 1, 

^' No. 2, . 

" No. 3, 
) poisonous bowl, 
i rum pauper's burial, 
} sea, 

i silver cord, , 
i soldier's tear, 



Dec 



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